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1.
Frontiers in immunology ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1958174

ABSTRACT

Background Because the major event in COVID-19 is the release of pre- and inflammatory cytokines, finding a reliable therapeutic strategy to inhibit this release, help patients manage organ damage and avoid ICU admission or severe disease progression is of paramount importance. Photobiomodulation (PBM), based on numerous studies, may help in this regard, and the present study sought to evaluate the effects of said technology on cytokine reduction. Methods This study was conducted in the 2nd half of 2021. The current study included 52 mild-to-moderately ill COVID-19, hospitalized patients. They were divided in two groups: a Placebo group and a PBM group, treated with PBM (620-635 nm light via 8 LEDs that provide an energy density of 45.40 J/cm2 and a power density of 0.12 W/cm2), twice daily for three days, along with classical approved treatment. 28 patients were in Placebo group and 24 in PBM group. In both groups, blood samples were taken four times in three days and serum IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α levels were determined. Results During the study period, in PBM group, there was a significant decrease in serum levels of IL-6 (-82.5% +/- 4, P<0.001), IL-8 (-54.4% ± 8, P<0.001), and TNF-α (-82.4% ± 8, P<0.001), although we did not detect a significant change in IL-10 during the study. The IL-6/IL-10 Ratio also improved in PBM group. The Placebo group showed no decrease or even an increase in these parameters. There were no reported complications or sequelae due to PBM therapy throughout the study. Conclusion The major cytokines in COVID-19 pathophysiology, including IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α, responded positively to PBM therapy and opened a new window for inhibiting and managing a cytokine storm within only 3-10 days.

2.
Tanaffos ; 19(4): 291-299, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1801409

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Inflammatory mediators are an important component in the pathophysiology of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This study aimed to assess the effects of reducing inflammatory mediators using hemoperfusion (HP) and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) on the mortality of patients with COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twelve patients with confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 were included. All patients had acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Patients were divided into three groups, namely, HP, CRRT and HP+CRRT. The primary outcome was mortality and the secondary outcomes were oxygenation and reduction in inflammatory mediators at the end of the study. RESULTS: Patients were not different at baseline in demographics, inflammatory cytokine levels, and the level of acute phase reactants. Half of the patients (3 out of 6) in the HP+CRRT group survived along with the survival of one patient (1 out of 2) in the HP group. All four patients in the CRRT group died. Serum creatinine (SCr), Interleukin-1 (IL1), Interleukin-6 (IL6), Interleukin-8 (IL8), partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2), O2 saturation (O2 sat), and hemodynamic parameters improved over time in HP+CRRT and CRRT groups, but no significant difference was observed in the HP group (All Ps > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Combined HP and CRRT demonstrated the best result in terms of mortality, reduction of inflammatory mediators and oxygenation. Further investigations are needed to explore the role of HP+CRRT in COVID-19 patients.

3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-322366

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) first emerged in Wuhan, China in December 2019, and since then the frequency of bacterial and fungal coinfections has been continuously rising. While invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is increasingly being recognized in association with COVID-19, there is limited information with regards to COVID-19 associated mucormycosis. Here, we describe a 50-year-old woman with uncontrolled diabetes who received systemic corticosteroids and remdesevir during her admission for COVID-19. Few days after discharge, the patient was readmitted due to facial swelling and numbness, and a diagnosis of COVID-19 associated rhinosinusitis mucormycosis due to Rhizopus arrhizus (formerly Rhizopus oryzae ) was confirmed with sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal DNA. This report aims to address the importance of short-term follow-up in COVID-19 patients who have received systemic corticosteroids, particularly those with predisposing conditions, as early detection and prompt, aggressive treatment is essential for the management of invasive fungal infections.

4.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 105(2): 449-453, 2021 Jul 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371040

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 first emerged in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. Since that time, the frequency of bacterial and fungal coinfections has been continuously increasing. Although invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is being increasingly recognized in association with COVID-19, there is limited information regarding COVID-19-associated mucormycosis. We describe a 50-year-old woman with uncontrolled diabetes who received systemic corticosteroids and remdesevir during her admission for COVID-19. A few days after discharge, the patient was readmitted because of facial swelling and numbness, and a diagnosis of COVID-19-associated rhinosinusitis mucormycosis caused by Rhizopus arrhizus (formerly called Rhizopus oryzae) was confirmed with sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal DNA. This report aimed to address the importance of short-term follow-up for COVID-19 patients who have received systemic corticosteroids, particularly those with predisposing conditions, because early detection and prompt, aggressive treatment are essential for the management of invasive fungal infections.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Rhinitis/etiology , Rhizopus oryzae/pathogenicity , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Sinusitis/etiology , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/adverse effects , DNA, Fungal/genetics , DNA, Ribosomal Spacer/genetics , Diabetes Mellitus , Fatal Outcome , Female , Humans , Invasive Fungal Infections/etiology , Middle Aged , Mucormycosis , Rhinitis/diagnosis , Rhinitis/microbiology , Sinusitis/diagnosis , Sinusitis/microbiology
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