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1.
Front Neurol ; 11: 613719, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006010

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We explored the impact of the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) emergency on the health of people with epilepsy (PwE). We also investigated their attitude toward telemedicine. Methods: The PubMed database up to September 10, 2020 was searched for questionnaire-based studies conducted in PwE during the COVID-19 emergency, and the literature retrieved was reviewed. In addition, all patients who had a telephone consultation with our center between May 7 and July 31, 2020 were invited to fill in a 57-item online questionnaire focusing on epilepsy and comorbidities, any changes in lifestyle or clinical conditions and any emergency-related problems arising during the COVID-19 emergency, and their views on telemedicine. Associations between variables were detected through X 2 test and Fisher's exact test. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to evaluate the effects of different factors on clinical conditions. Results: Twelve studies met the literature search criteria. They showed that the rate of seizure worsening during the emergency ranged from 4 to 35% and was mainly correlated with epilepsy severity, sleep disturbances and COVID-19-related issues. Our questionnaire was filled in by 222 PwE or caregivers. One hundred (76.6%) reported unchanged clinical conditions, 25 (11.3%) an improvement, and 27 (12%) a deterioration. Reported clinical worsening was associated with a psychiatric condition and/or medication (OR = 12.59, p < 0.001), sleep disorders (OR = 8.41, p = 0.001), limited access to healthcare (OR = 4.71, p = 0.016), and experiencing seizures during the emergency (OR = 4.51, p = 0.007). Telemedicine was considered acceptable by 116 subjects (52.3%). Conclusions: Most PwE did not experience a significant change in their clinical conditions during the COVID-19 emergency. However, severity of epilepsy, concomitant disability, comorbid psychiatric conditions, sleep disorders and limited access to healthcare may affect their health.

2.
Sleep Med ; 77: 45-50, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-912629

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic required a thorough re-organization of every sector of the healthcare system. Sleep laboratories need to renew protocols in order to guarantee the safety of patients and healthcare staff while providing exams. Polysomnography (PSG) examinations are essential for the diagnosis and treatment management of several sleep disorders, which may constitute a public or personal safety issue such as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Here we provide some practical advice on how to perform sleep studies after the COVID-19 outbreak based on our experience, the review of the existing literature and current national and international recommendations by Health Authorities. We believe that with appropriate precautions it is possible to guarantee a safe restart of PSG and other sleep studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Decision-Making , Polysomnography/standards , Sleep Apnea, Obstructive/diagnosis , Humans , Positive-Pressure Respiration/standards , Societies, Medical , Telemedicine/organization & administration
3.
J Neuroimmunol ; 349: 577400, 2020 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-792960

ABSTRACT

Encephalopathy is emerging as a recurrent complication of COVID-19 yet remains poorly characterized. We report the case of a middle-aged woman with COVID-19-related encephalopathy presenting as expressive aphasia and inattentiveness, subsequently progressing to agitation and marked confusion. Brain MRI and CSF analysis were unremarkable, while EEG showed slowing with frontal sharp waves. Neuropsychiatric symptoms resolved following treatment with tocilizumab. CNS involvement in COVID-19 may present as a subacute encephalopathy characterized by prominent frontal lobe dysfunction, with language disturbances as first neurological manifestation. Future studies should further investigate the role of tocilizumab in treating COVID-19-related encephalopathy.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Aphasia/etiology , Brain Diseases/virology , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Brain Diseases/drug therapy , Brain Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Clin Auton Res ; 30(4): 325-330, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641275

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has changed the way most medical procedures are performed. Autonomic units, as well as other healthcare sectors, are required to undergo a thorough reorganization of the protocols in order to guarantee the safety of patients and healthcare staff. Cardiovascular autonomic function testing (CAFT) is necessary in certain situations; however, it poses several concerns which need to be addressed. Here, we provide some practical advice based on current national and international health authorities' recommendations and our experience about how to perform CAFT during the COVID-19 emergency. We examine aspects regarding patients, healthcare staff, laboratory preparation, and test performance.


Subject(s)
Autonomic Nervous System/physiology , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diagnostic Techniques, Cardiovascular/standards , Health Personnel/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2
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