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1.
Bastard, Paul, Vazquez, Sara, Liu, Jamin, Laurie, Matthew T.; Wang, Chung Yu, Gervais, Adrian, Le Voyer, Tom, Bizien, Lucy, Zamecnik, Colin, Philippot, Quentin, Rosain, Jérémie, Catherinot, Emilie, Willmore, Andrew, Mitchell, Anthea M.; Bair, Rebecca, Garçon, Pierre, Kenney, Heather, Fekkar, Arnaud, Salagianni, Maria, Poulakou, Garyphallia, Siouti, Eleni, Sahanic, Sabina, Tancevski, Ivan, Weiss, Günter, Nagl, Laurenz, Manry, Jérémy, Duvlis, Sotirija, Arroyo-Sánchez, Daniel, Paz Artal, Estela, Rubio, Luis, Perani, Cristiano, Bezzi, Michela, Sottini, Alessandra, Quaresima, Virginia, Roussel, Lucie, Vinh, Donald C.; Reyes, Luis Felipe, Garzaro, Margaux, Hatipoglu, Nevin, Boutboul, David, Tandjaoui-Lambiotte, Yacine, Borghesi, Alessandro, Aliberti, Anna, Cassaniti, Irene, Venet, Fabienne, Monneret, Guillaume, Halwani, Rabih, Sharif-Askari, Narjes Saheb, Danielson, Jeffrey, Burrel, Sonia, Morbieu, Caroline, Stepanovskyy, Yurii, Bondarenko, Anastasia, Volokha, Alla, Boyarchuk, Oksana, Gagro, Alenka, Neuville, Mathilde, Neven, Bénédicte, Keles, Sevgi, Hernu, Romain, Bal, Antonin, Novelli, Antonio, Novelli, Giuseppe, Saker, Kahina, Ailioaie, Oana, Antolí, Arnau, Jeziorski, Eric, Rocamora-Blanch, Gemma, Teixeira, Carla, Delaunay, Clarisse, Lhuillier, Marine, Le Turnier, Paul, Zhang, Yu, Mahevas, Matthieu, Pan-Hammarström, Qiang, Abolhassani, Hassan, Bompoil, Thierry, Dorgham, Karim, consortium, Covid Hge, French, Covid study group, consortium, Comet, Gorochov, Guy, Laouenan, Cédric, Rodríguez-Gallego, Carlos, Ng, Lisa F. P.; Renia, Laurent, Pujol, Aurora, Belot, Alexandre, Raffi, François, Allende, Luis M.; Martinez-Picado, Javier, Ozcelik, Tayfun, Keles, Sevgi, Imberti, Luisa, Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Troya, Jesus, Solanich, Xavier, Zhang, Shen-Ying, Puel, Anne, Wilson, Michael R.; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie, Abel, Laurent, Jouanguy, Emmanuelle, Ye, Chun Jimmie, Cobat, Aurélie, Thompson, Leslie M.; Andreakos, Evangelos, Zhang, Qian, Anderson, Mark S.; Casanova, Jean-Laurent, DeRisi, Joseph L..
Science immunology ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1918542

ABSTRACT

Life-threatening ‘breakthrough’ cases of critical COVID-19 are attributed to poor or waning antibody response to the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in individuals already at risk. Pre-existing autoantibodies (auto-Abs) neutralizing type I IFNs underlie at least 15% of critical COVID-19 pneumonia cases in unvaccinated individuals;however, their contribution to hypoxemic breakthrough cases in vaccinated people remains unknown. Here, we studied a cohort of 48 individuals (age 20-86 years) who received 2 doses of an mRNA vaccine and developed a breakthrough infection with hypoxemic COVID-19 pneumonia 2 weeks to 4 months later. Antibody levels to the vaccine, neutralization of the virus, and auto-Abs to type I IFNs were measured in the plasma. Forty-two individuals had no known deficiency of B cell immunity and a normal antibody response to the vaccine. Among them, ten (24%) had auto-Abs neutralizing type I IFNs (aged 43-86 years). Eight of these ten patients had auto-Abs neutralizing both IFN-α2 and IFN-ω, while two neutralized IFN-ω only. No patient neutralized IFN-β. Seven neutralized 10 ng/mL of type I IFNs, and three 100 pg/mL only. Seven patients neutralized SARS-CoV-2 D614G and the Delta variant (B.1.617.2) efficiently, while one patient neutralized Delta slightly less efficiently. Two of the three patients neutralizing only 100 pg/mL of type I IFNs neutralized both D61G and Delta less efficiently. Despite two mRNA vaccine inoculations and the presence of circulating antibodies capable of neutralizing SARS-CoV-2, auto-Abs neutralizing type I IFNs may underlie a significant proportion of hypoxemic COVID-19 pneumonia cases, highlighting the importance of this particularly vulnerable population. Type I IFN auto-Abs are found in 20% of hypoxemic, mRNA vaccinated COVID-19 patients despite SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies. Description

2.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-334201

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Pre-mRNA splicing is initiated with the recognition of a single-nucleotide intronic branchpoint (BP) within a BP motif by spliceosome elements. Fifty-six rare variants in 44 human genes have been reported to alter splicing and cause disease by disrupting BP. However, until now, no computational approach has been available to efficiently detect such variants in next-generation sequencing (NGS) data. We established a comprehensive human genome-wide BP database by integrating existing BP data, and by generating new BP data from RNA-seq of lariat debranching enzyme DBR1-mutated patients and from machine-learning predictions. We in-depth characterize multiple features of BP in major and minor introns, and find that BP and BP-2 (two-nucleotides upstream of BP) positions exhibit a lower rate of variation in human populations and higher evolutionary conservation than the intronic background, whilst being comparable to the exonic background. We develop BPHunter as a genome-wide computational approach to systematically and efficiently detect intronic variants that may disrupt BP recognition in NGS data. BPHunter retrospectively identifies 48 of the 56 known pathogenic BP mutations in which we summarize a strategy for prioritizing BP mutation candidates, and the remaining 8 all create AG dinucleotides between BP and acceptor site which is probably the reason for mis-splicing. We demonstrate the utility of BPHunter prospectively by using it to identify a novel germline heterozygous BP variant of STAT2 in a patient with critical COVID-19 pneumonia, and a novel somatic intronic 59-nucleotide deletion of ITPKB in a lymphoma patient, both of which we validate experimentally. BPHunter is publicly available from https://hgidsoft.rockefeller.edu/BPHunter and https://github.com/casanova-lab/BPHunter .

3.
J Exp Med ; 219(4)2022 04 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1758591

ABSTRACT

The vast interindividual clinical variability observed in any microbial infection-ranging from silent infection to lethal disease-is increasingly being explained by human genetic and immunological determinants. Autoantibodies neutralizing specific cytokines underlie the same infectious diseases as inborn errors of the corresponding cytokine or response pathway. Autoantibodies against type I IFNs underlie COVID-19 pneumonia and adverse reactions to the live attenuated yellow fever virus vaccine. Autoantibodies against type II IFN underlie severe disease caused by environmental or tuberculous mycobacteria, and other intra-macrophagic microbes. Autoantibodies against IL-17A/F and IL-6 are less common and underlie mucocutaneous candidiasis and staphylococcal diseases, respectively. Inborn errors of and autoantibodies against GM-CSF underlie pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; associated infections are less well characterized. In individual patients, autoantibodies against cytokines preexist infection with the pathogen concerned and underlie the infectious disease. Human antibody-driven autoimmunity can interfere with cytokines that are essential for protective immunity to specific infectious agents but that are otherwise redundant, thereby underlying specific infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Candidiasis, Chronic Mucocutaneous , Communicable Diseases , Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis , Autoantibodies , Candidiasis, Chronic Mucocutaneous/genetics , Humans
4.
Transfusion Clinique et Biologique ; 28(4):S24-S24, 2021.
Article in French | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1492671

ABSTRACT

L'infection à SARS-CoV-2 conduit à une variabilité inter-individuelle importante. Nous avons identifié que des défauts génétiques de l'immunité lié aux interférons de type 1, TLR3 et IRF7-dépendants, peuvent être la cause de formes sévères de pneumopathie à COVID-19. Les patients déficients en AIRE, souffrent d'APS-1 et produisent de nombreux autoanticorps (auto-Ac), notamment les anti-IFNs de type I. Étonnamment, chez les patients avec des formes sévères de pneumopathie à COVID-19, nous avons trouvé qu'au moins 10 % d'entre eux avaient des auto-Ac IgG neutralisants 10 ng/mL d'IFN-w, d'IFN-a2. Ces auto-Ac neutralisent la capacité des IFNs de type I de bloquer l'infection à SARS-CoV-2 in vitro, et ont été retrouvé dans des plasmas de donneurs convalescents. Nous avons également trouvé des auto-Ac neutralisants des doses 100 fois moindres, donc plus physiologiques chez au moins 15 % des patients avec des formes sévères de pneumopathie à COVID-19, notamment chez 21 % des patients de plus de 80 ans. Enfin, dans un échantillon de 33 352 individus non infectés de la population générale, notamment des donneurs de sang de l'EFS, la prévalence des auto-Ac neutralisants les doses fortes d'IFNs de type I augmente avec l'âge. La proportion d'individus porteurs d'auto-Ac neutralisants des concentrations d'IFN 100 fois plus faibles étaient encore plus élevée. Le dépistage des donneurs de sang et de plasma convalescent pourrait avoir un impact thérapeutique. Les auto-Ac anti-IFNs de type I précèdent l'infection à SARS-CoV-2, augmentent de façon importante après 70 ans, et expliquent au moins 20 % des formes fatales et des formes sévères de COVID-19 chez les individus de plus de 80 ans. (French) [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Transfusion Clinique et Biologique is the property of Elsevier B.V. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

5.
J Exp Med ; 218(4)2021 04 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066211

ABSTRACT

Yellow fever virus (YFV) live attenuated vaccine can, in rare cases, cause life-threatening disease, typically in patients with no previous history of severe viral illness. Autosomal recessive (AR) complete IFNAR1 deficiency was reported in one 12-yr-old patient. Here, we studied seven other previously healthy patients aged 13 to 80 yr with unexplained life-threatening YFV vaccine-associated disease. One 13-yr-old patient had AR complete IFNAR2 deficiency. Three other patients vaccinated at the ages of 47, 57, and 64 yr had high titers of circulating auto-Abs against at least 14 of the 17 individual type I IFNs. These antibodies were recently shown to underlie at least 10% of cases of life-threatening COVID-19 pneumonia. The auto-Abs were neutralizing in vitro, blocking the protective effect of IFN-α2 against YFV vaccine strains. AR IFNAR1 or IFNAR2 deficiency and neutralizing auto-Abs against type I IFNs thus accounted for more than half the cases of life-threatening YFV vaccine-associated disease studied here. Previously healthy subjects could be tested for both predispositions before anti-YFV vaccination.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Autoantibodies/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases , COVID-19 , Genetic Diseases, Inborn , Interferon-alpha , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta , SARS-CoV-2 , Yellow Fever Vaccine , Yellow fever virus , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Autoimmune Diseases/genetics , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/genetics , Genetic Diseases, Inborn/immunology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Interferon-alpha/genetics , Interferon-alpha/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/deficiency , Receptor, Interferon alpha-beta/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Vaccines, Attenuated/genetics , Vaccines, Attenuated/immunology , Yellow Fever Vaccine/adverse effects , Yellow Fever Vaccine/genetics , Yellow Fever Vaccine/immunology , Yellow fever virus/genetics , Yellow fever virus/immunology
6.
J Exp Med ; 218(4)2021 04 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1061104

ABSTRACT

Several studies have analyzed antiviral immune pathways in late-stage severe COVID-19. However, the initial steps of SARS-CoV-2 antiviral immunity are poorly understood. Here we have isolated primary SARS-CoV-2 viral strains and studied their interaction with human plasmacytoid predendritic cells (pDCs), a key player in antiviral immunity. We show that pDCs are not productively infected by SARS-CoV-2. However, they efficiently diversified into activated P1-, P2-, and P3-pDC effector subsets in response to viral stimulation. They expressed CD80, CD86, CCR7, and OX40 ligand at levels similar to influenza virus-induced activation. They rapidly produced high levels of interferon-α, interferon-λ1, IL-6, IP-10, and IL-8. All major aspects of SARS-CoV-2-induced pDC activation were inhibited by hydroxychloroquine. Mechanistically, SARS-CoV-2-induced pDC activation critically depended on IRAK4 and UNC93B1, as established using pDC from genetically deficient patients. Overall, our data indicate that human pDC are efficiently activated by SARS-CoV-2 particles and may thus contribute to type I IFN-dependent immunity against SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/metabolism , Cell Plasticity/immunology , Dendritic Cells/immunology , Dendritic Cells/metabolism , Interleukin-1 Receptor-Associated Kinases/metabolism , Membrane Transport Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Biomarkers , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cytokines/metabolism , Dendritic Cells/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunomodulation , Immunophenotyping , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Interferons/metabolism
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