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1.
Psychiatr Prax ; 2021 Aug 05.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343490

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic represents an exceptional challenge for the medical fraternity. We examined the differences in experiencing anxiety of general practitioners (GP), psychiatrists (PS) and surgeons (SU) during the COVID-19 pandemic in Germany. METHODS: E-mail-based survey (April-May 2020) of 608 physicians (GP n = 162, PS n = 299, SU n = 147) on anxiety experience in relation to COVID-19 and potential determinants. RESULTS: High levels of COVID-19-related anxiety were reported by 31.1 % of GP, 19.2 % of PS, and 11.6 % of SU. The frequency of contact with COVID-19 patients was highest in SU (68.5 %), followed by GP (51.0 %) and PS (8.1 %). The experience of COVID-19-related distress was overall highest among GP. SU felt best informed and rated their resilience most highly. A high level of anxiety was positively associated with the perceived risk of infection. CONCLUSION: Studies on the distress of physicians provide important information to optimize pandemic management.

2.
PLoS One ; 16(2): e0246956, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085151

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic led to the implementation of drastic shutdown measures worldwide. While quarantine, self-isolation and shutdown laws helped to effectively contain and control the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the impact of COVID-19 shutdowns on trauma care in emergency departments (EDs) remains elusive. METHODS: All ED patient records from the 35-day COVID-19 shutdown (SHUTDOWN) period were retrospectively compared to a calendar-matched control period in 2019 (CTRL) as well as to a pre (PRE)- and post (POST)-shutdown period in an academic Level I Trauma Center in Berlin, Germany. Total patient and orthopedic trauma cases and contacts as well as trauma causes and injury patterns were evaluated during respective periods regarding absolute numbers, incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and risk ratios (RRs). FINDINGS: Daily total patient cases (SHUTDOWN vs. CTRL, 106.94 vs. 167.54) and orthopedic trauma cases (SHUTDOWN vs. CTRL, 30.91 vs. 52.06) decreased during the SHUTDOWN compared to the CTRL period with IRRs of 0.64 and 0.59. While absolute numbers decreased for most trauma causes during the SHUTDOWN period, we observed increased incidence proportions of household injuries and bicycle accidents with RRs of 1.31 and 1.68 respectively. An RR of 2.41 was observed for injuries due to domestic violence. We further recorded increased incidence proportions of acute and regular substance abuse during the SHUTDOWN period with RRs of 1.63 and 3.22, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: While we observed a relevant decrease in total patient cases, relative proportions of specific trauma causes and injury patterns increased during the COVID-19 shutdown in Berlin, Germany. As government programs offered prompt financial aid during the pandemic to individuals and businesses, additional social support may be considered for vulnerable domestic environments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Fractures, Bone/epidemiology , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Trauma Centers/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , Fractures, Bone/classification , Fractures, Bone/etiology , Germany , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Humans
4.
Z Orthop Unfall ; 159(1): 32-38, 2021 02.
Article in English, German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-837549

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Far-reaching political steps to contain the COVID-19 pandemic have been undertaken in recent weeks. These also impact on surgical specialties not directly involved in the management of patients infected with the coronavirus. The Spine Section, the interdisciplinary professional political arm of the German Spine Society (DWG), the Professional Association for Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery (BVOU), and the Federal Association of German Neurosurgeons (BDNC) conducted a survey on the collateral effects of the pandemic on spine surgery in Germany. METHOD: This cross-sectional study included outpatient, day-patient and inpatient facilities caring for patients with spinal disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey was designed to analyse the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the management of inpatients and outpatients with spinal disorders and to assess the economic ramifications in the various settings. RESULTS: All members of the Spine Section (n = 134) were invited to participate in the questionnaire consented by BVOU and BDNC. The questions were answered anonymously, and the personal data entered did not permit any de-anonymisation. All in all, 68% (n = 91) of the respondents completed the survey in full. Based on the type of employment (practice 30%, practice/staff: 45% and staff: 25%) and range of activities (conservative: 5%, conservative/operative: 75%, operative: 20%) the survey by the Spine Section can be regarded as representative. 95% of the practices/outpatient clinics reported a decline in their number of patients. In addition, the number of operations performed fell by 36% (SD 17%). The percentage of elective procedures declined from approximately 78% to 6%. As a result, more than half of the physicians anticipated moderate (20 - 40%) economic challenges and 25% major (> 50%) financial problems. CONCLUSION: In order to cushion collateral damage in the wake of future pandemic management, any implications in the interdisciplinary management of patients with spinal disorders should be based on these results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Spinal Diseases/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Germany , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0238759, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-748976

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on orthopedic and trauma surgery in private practices and hospitals in Germany. DESIGN: In this cross-sectional study, an online-based anonymous survey was conducted from April 2th to April 16th 2020. SETTING: The survey was conducted among 15.0000 of 18.000 orthopedic and trauma surgeons in Germany, both in private practices and hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: All members of the German Society of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery (DGOU) and the Professional Association for Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery (BVOU). were invited by e-mail to participate in the survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Out of 50 questions 42 were designed to enquire a certain dimension of the pandemic impact and contribute to one of six indices, namely "Preparedness", "Resources", "Reduction", "Informedness", "Concern", and "Depletion". Data was analyzed in multiple stepwise regression, aiming to identify those factors that independently influenced the indices. RESULTS: 858 orthopedic and trauma surgeons participated in the survey throughout Germany. In the multiple regression analysis, being employed at a hospital was identified as an independent positive predictor in the indices for "Preparedness", "Resources", and "Informedness" and an independent negative predictor regarding "Depletion". Self-employment was found to be an independent positive predictor of the financial index "Depletion". Female surgeons were identified as an independent variable for a higher level of "Concern". CONCLUSIONS: The study confirms a distinct impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on orthopedic and trauma surgery in Germany. The containment measures are largely considered appropriate despite severe financial constraints. A substantial lack of personal protective equipment (PPE) is reported. The multiple regression analysis shows that self-employed surgeons are more affected by this shortage as well as by the financial consequences than surgeons working in hospitals. WHAT ARE THE NEW FINDINGS: The COVID-19 pandemic has a profound impact on orthopedic and trauma surgery as an unrelated specialty. Self-employed surgeons are affected especially by a shortage of PPE and financial consequences. HOW MIGHT IT IMPACT ON CLINICAL PRACTICE IN THE NEAR FUTURE: Political and financial support can now be applied more focused to subgroups in the field of orthopedics and trauma surgery with an increased demand for support. A special emphasis should be set on the support of self-employed surgeons which are a more affected by the shortage of PPE and financial consequences than surgeons working in hospitals.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Surgeons/psychology , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Germany , Hospitals , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Orthopedic Procedures , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 102(14): e78, 2020 Jul 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-325181

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The purpose of the present study was to assess the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on orthopaedic and trauma surgery departments in university hospitals in Germany in order to clarify current challenges. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, an online-based anonymous survey was conducted within the Convention of University Professors of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery in Germany from April 3 to April 11, 2020. A bipolar 5-point Likert scale (with possible responses of "totally disagree," "rather disagree," "neutral," "rather agree," and "totally agree") was applied. Fifty-two (69.3%) of 75 clinic directors participated. RESULTS: Communication and cooperation with the government, hospital administration, and other departments during the COVID-19 pandemic were mainly perceived as appropriate. However, only 7 respondents (13.7%) totally agreed or rather agreed with the statement that the authorities are supporters of orthopaedic and trauma surgery departments. Substantial financial and personnel changes in orthopaedic and trauma surgery departments of university hospitals were reported, resulting in an average reduction of 49.4% in operating room capacity and an expected 29.3% loss of revenue. In addition, 14.7% of physicians were reallocated from orthopaedic and trauma surgery to other care-delivery environments. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated that the COVID-19 pandemic has had a substantial impact on orthopaedic and trauma surgery departments in German university hospitals. Distinct structural and financial effects were noted. Nevertheless, the present study demonstrates the commitment of our specialty to overcome the pandemic by providing competent personnel as well as close cooperation with the hospital administration and other departments. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: To our knowledge, this is the first Germany-wide survey among the heads of orthopaedic and trauma surgery departments in university hospitals on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. The survey results may help to inform system-wide decision-making in Germany, in Europe, and beyond.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hospitals, University/organization & administration , Orthopedics/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Trauma Centers/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Germany/epidemiology , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Orthopedic Procedures , Orthopedic Surgeons , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Psychiatr Prax ; 47(4): 190-197, 2020 May.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-134184

ABSTRACT

AIM: Review of studies on the psychological stress of healthcare workers caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A literature search of PubMed was performed using the terms "COVID-19", "stress", "mental health", "healthcare worker", "staff", "psychiatry". Quantitative studies (including letters to the editor) published from January to March 2020 were included. RESULTS: 14 studies on healthcare workers in departments of infectiology, internal medicine, and fever wards including intensive care wards as well as surgery and psychiatry, were included. The Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ9), Self-rating-Anxiety Scale (SAS) and Impact of Event Scale (IES-R) were the most often used test instruments. The sample size ranged between 37 and 1257 participants consisting of mostly nursing and medical personnel. The fraction of COVID-19-associated activities varied from 7.5 % to 100 %. An extensive strain was reported due to stress experience as well as depression and anxiety symptoms. Severe degrees of those symptoms were found in 2.2 % to 14.5 % of all participants. The severity of mental symptoms was influenced by age, gender, occupation, specialization, type of activities performed and proximity to COVID-19 patients. As mediator variables selection of personnel, preventive interventions, resilience, and social support were reported. CONCLUSION: Considering the frequency of mental symptoms occurring in healthcare workers, accompanying mental health informed interventions to facilitate coping are necessary. Further research in this field is needed.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Stress, Psychological , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Germany , Humans , Mental Health , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
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