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1.
Non-conventional in English | MEDLINE, Grey literature | ID: grc-750509

ABSTRACT

Limited data are available for pregnant women affected by SARS-CoV-2. Serological tests are critically important to determine exposure and immunity to SARS-CoV-2 within both individuals and populations. We completed SARS-CoV-2 serological testing of 1,293 parturient women at two centers in Philadelphia from April 4 to June 3, 2020. We tested 834 pre-pandemic samples collected in 2019 and 15 samples from COVID-19 recovered donors to validate our assay, which has a ~1% false positive rate. We found 80/1,293 (6.2%) of parturient women possessed IgG and/or IgM SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies. We found race/ethnicity differences in seroprevalence rates, with higher rates in Black/non-Hispanic and Hispanic/Latino women. Of the 72 seropositive women who also received nasopharyngeal polymerase chain reaction testing during pregnancy, 46 (64%) were positive. Continued serologic surveillance among pregnant women may inform perinatal clinical practices and can potentially be used to estimate seroprevalence within the community.

2.
Clin Infect Dis ; 72(1): 131-132, 2021 01 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244878
3.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 40(7): e266-e267, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238262
4.
Curr Opin Pediatr ; 33(2): 188-194, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060967

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim of this review was to describe the process of and challenges in developing national guidance for management of infants born to mothers with COVID-19. RECENT FINDINGS: Beginning in January 2020, infection with the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 spread across the USA, causing the illness COVID-19. As pregnant women began to present for delivery while sick with COVID-19, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) convened a writing group in March 2020 to develop guidance for the management of their newborns. The initial guidance was developed emergently and was forced to rely on extremely limited data from China. The initial guidance advocated for a conservative approach that included temporary physical separation of infected mother and newborn. To address the knowledge deficit, the AAP sponsored a volunteer registry to collect data on perinatal infection and management. As data have emerged informing the natural history of COVID-19, the performance of PCR-based diagnostics, the value of infection control measures and the risk of infant disease, AAP has issued serial updates to newborn guidance. SUMMARY: Evolving knowledge on the epidemiology of perinatal COVID-19 has informed newborn guidance. The most recent guidance focuses on the use of infection control measures to support maternal-newborn contact and breastfeeding.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Breast Feeding , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2
5.
JAMA Pediatr ; 175(6): 594-600, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052819

ABSTRACT

Importance: Maternally derived antibodies are a key element of neonatal immunity. Understanding the dynamics of maternal antibody responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection during pregnancy and subsequent transplacental antibody transfer can inform neonatal management as well as maternal vaccination strategies. Objective: To assess the association between maternal and neonatal SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody concentrations. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study took place at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A total of 1714 women delivered at the study site between April 9 and August 8, 2020. Maternal and cord blood sera were available for antibody measurement for 1471 mother/newborn dyads. Exposures: SARS-CoV-2. Main Outcomes and Measures: IgG and IgM antibodies to the receptor-binding domain of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibody concentrations and transplacental transfer ratios were analyzed in combination with demographic and clinical data. Results: The study cohort consisted of 1714 parturient women, with median (interquartile range) age of 32 (28-35) years, of whom 450 (26.3%) identified as Black/non-Hispanic, 879 (51.3%) as White/non-Hispanic, 203 (11.8%) as Hispanic, 126 (7.3%) as Asian, and 56 (3.3%) as other race/ethnicity. Among 1471 mother/newborn dyads for which matched sera were available, SARS-CoV-2 IgG and/or IgM antibodies were detected in 83 of 1471 women (6%; 95% CI, 5%-7%) at the time of delivery, and IgG was detected in cord blood from 72 of 83 newborns (87%; 95% CI, 78%-93%). IgM was not detected in any cord blood specimen, and antibodies were not detected in any infant born to a seronegative mother. Eleven infants born to seropositive mothers were seronegative: 5 of 11 (45%) were born to mothers with IgM antibody only, and 6 of 11 (55%) were born to mothers with significantly lower IgG concentrations compared with those found among mothers of seropositive infants. Cord blood IgG concentrations were positively correlated with maternal IgG concentrations (r = 0.886; P < .001). Placental transfer ratios more than 1.0 were observed among women with asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infections as well as those with mild, moderate, and severe coronavirus disease 2019. Transfer ratios increased with increasing time between onset of maternal infection and delivery. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study, maternal IgG antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 were transferred across the placenta after asymptomatic as well as symptomatic infection during pregnancy. Cord blood antibody concentrations correlated with maternal antibody concentrations and with duration between onset of infection and delivery. Our findings demonstrate the potential for maternally derived SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies to provide neonatal protection from coronavirus disease 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/blood , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Cohort Studies , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Fetal Blood/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Pregnancy
6.
JAMA Pediatr ; 175(3): 240-242, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-962135
7.
JAMA Pediatr ; 175(2): 129-130, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-844618
8.
Sci Immunol ; 5(49)2020 07 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690482

ABSTRACT

Limited data are available for pregnant women affected by SARS-CoV-2. Serological tests are critically important for determining SARS-CoV-2 exposures within both individuals and populations. We validated a SARS-CoV-2 spike receptor binding domain serological test using 834 pre-pandemic samples and 31 samples from COVID-19 recovered donors. We then completed SARS-CoV-2 serological testing of 1,293 parturient women at two centers in Philadelphia from April 4 to June 3, 2020. We found 80/1,293 (6.2%) of parturient women possessed IgG and/or IgM SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies. We found race/ethnicity differences in seroprevalence rates, with higher rates in Black/non-Hispanic and Hispanic/Latino women. Of the 72 seropositive women who also received nasopharyngeal polymerase chain reaction testing during pregnancy, 46 (64%) were positive. Continued serologic surveillance among pregnant women may inform perinatal clinical practices and can potentially be used to estimate exposure to SARS-CoV-2 within the community.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Status Disparities , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Adult , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Pandemics , Philadelphia/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Protein Domains/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Young Adult
9.
medRxiv ; 2020 Jul 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-663600

ABSTRACT

Limited data are available for pregnant women affected by SARS-CoV-2. Serological tests are critically important to determine exposure and immunity to SARS-CoV-2 within both individuals and populations. We completed SARS-CoV-2 serological testing of 1,293 parturient women at two centers in Philadelphia from April 4 to June 3, 2020. We tested 834 pre-pandemic samples collected in 2019 and 15 samples from COVID-19 recovered donors to validate our assay, which has a ~1% false positive rate. We found 80/1,293 (6.2%) of parturient women possessed IgG and/or IgM SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies. We found race/ethnicity differences in seroprevalence rates, with higher rates in Black/non-Hispanic and Hispanic/Latino women. Of the 72 seropositive women who also received nasopharyngeal polymerase chain reaction testing during pregnancy, 46 (64%) were positive. Continued serologic surveillance among pregnant women may inform perinatal clinical practices and can potentially be used to estimate seroprevalence within the community.

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