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1.
Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes ; 15: 1725-1736, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35706475

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The leuko-glycaemic index (LGI) is an index that combines white blood cell count and blood glucose and could be a marker of systemic inflammatory response syndrome. The prognostic value of the LGI in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is still unclear. We aimed to investigate the prognostic value of the LGI for short- and long-term prognosis in AMI patients with different diabetic status. Patients and Methods: This was an observational, multicenter study involving 1256 AMI patients admitted in 11 hospitals between March 2014 and June 2019 in Chengdu. White blood cell count and blood glucose were measured on admission. The LGI was calculated by multiplying both values and dividing them by a thousand. Logistic regression was used to explore the predictive value of LGI in in-hospital mortality. Receiver operating characteristic curve was used to determine the optimal cut-off values of the LGI to predict in-hospital mortality. The patients were classified into diabetic and non-diabetic groups and further divided into higher and lower LGI subgroups according to the optimal cut-off values. The endpoints were all-cause mortality during the hospitalization and major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) during follow-up, including all-cause mortality, non-fatal myocardial infarction, vessel revascularization and non-fatal stroke. Results: LGI was an independent predictor of all-cause mortality during the hospitalization in non-diabetics, but not in diabetics. The optimal cut-off values of diabetics and non-diabetics were 3593 mg/dl. mm3 and 1402 mg/dl. mm3, respectively. Whether diabetics or not, in-hospital mortality was higher in the higher LGI subgroup (p-value < 0.001). And in the follow-up of 15 months (9 months, 22 months), we observed 99 (8.6%), 6 (0.5%), 54 (4.7%) and 29 (2.5%) cases of death, non-fatal MI, revascularization and non-fatal stroke, respectively. The cumulative incidence of MACCE during follow-up was higher in the higher LGI subgroup, both in the diabetics and non-diabetics (p-value < 0.05). In non-diabetics, higher LGI was an independent predictor of MACCE. Conclusion: LGI was an independent predictor for short- and long-term prognosis in AMI patients without diabetes, but had no prognostic value for short- and long-term prognosis of AMI patients with diabetes.

2.
Coron Artery Dis ; 33(5): 385-393, 2022 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35170550

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Whether lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] is associated with recurrent cardiovascular events (RCVEs) still remains controversial. The present study aimed to investigate the prognostic value of Lp(a) for long-term RCVEs and each component of it in people with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). METHODS: This multicenter, observational and retrospective study enrolled 765 ACS patients at 11 hospitals in Chengdu from January 2014 to June 2019. Patients were assigned to low-Lp(a) group [Lp(a) < 30 mg/dl] and high-Lp(a) group [Lp(a) ≥ 30 mg/dl]. The primary and secondary endpoints were defined as RCVEs and their elements, including all-cause death, nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI), nonfatal stroke and unplanned revascularization. RESULTS: Over a median 17-month follow-up, 113 (14.8%) patients presented with RCVEs were reported, among which we observed 57 (7.5%) all-cause deaths, 22 (2.9%) cases of nonfatal stroke, 13 (1.7%) cases of nonfatal MI and 33 (4.3%) cases of unplanned revascularization. The incidences of RCVEs and revascularization in the high-Lp(a) group were significantly higher than those in the low-Lp(a) group ( P < 0.05), whereas rates of all-cause death, nonfatal stroke and nonfatal MI were not statistically different ( P > 0.05). Kaplan-Meier analysis also revealed the same trend. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis showed that 1-SD increase of Lp(a) was independently associated with both the primary endpoint event [hazard ratio (HR), 1.285 per 1-SD; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.112-1.484; P < 0.001] and revascularization (HR, 1.588 per 1-SD; 95% CI, 1.305-1.932; P < 0.001), but not with the other secondary events. CONCLUSION: Increased Lp(a) is an independent predictor of RCVEs and unplanned revascularization in patients with ACS.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome , Myocardial Infarction , Stroke , Acute Coronary Syndrome/diagnosis , Acute Coronary Syndrome/therapy , Biomarkers , Humans , Lipoprotein(a) , Myocardial Infarction/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Stroke/epidemiology
3.
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol ; 45(6): 815-817, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35134252

ABSTRACT

We report a case in which real-time remote interrogation and reprogramming of the parameters of a dual-chamber pacemaker was performed during the COVID-19 pandemic. The described case demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of CIED remote programming based on the 5G cloud technology support platform (5G-CTP), and showed that the application of real-time remote programming would help in reducing the risk of cross-infection between doctors and patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pacemaker, Artificial , Humans , Pandemics
4.
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak ; 31(12): 1394-1398, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34794276

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate standard modifiable cardiovascular risk factors (SMuRFs) and prognosis of patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) aged 50 years or younger. STUDY DESIGN: An observational study. PLACE AND DURATION OF STUDY: Eleven general hospitals in Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China, from January 2017 to June 2019. METHODOLOGY: Patients with ACS were stratified into younger group (≤50 years) and older group (>50 years). The baseline characteristics and prognosis were compared for two groups. Survival analysis was used to assess the long-term prognosis. RESULTS: Among a total of 1982 ACS patients, 322 (16.2%) were of ≤50 years. Compared with older patients, younger patients were more likely to have at least one SMuRFs (90.0% vs. 84.3%, p=0.013). The younger group had a higher prevalence of smoking (62.8% vs. 34.1%, p <0.001) and hypercholesterolemia (36.2% vs. 23.4%, p <0.001) compared with the older group. Younger male patients were more likely to have at least one SMuRFs than younger female patients (91.6% vs. 74.1%, p = 0.011). After the follow-up of 15 (10, 22) months, the cumulative rates of major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) of the younger patients were significantly lower than those in the older patients [hazard ratio (HR): 0.2661, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.1932 - 0.3665, p <0.001]. CONCLUSION: Younger patients with ACS were more likely to have at least one SMuRFs; and were likely to have a better prognosis than older patients. Key Words: Coronary artery disease, Acute coronary syndrome, Middle aged, Risk factors, Prognosis.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome , Cardiovascular Diseases , Percutaneous Coronary Intervention , Acute Coronary Syndrome/diagnosis , Acute Coronary Syndrome/epidemiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Female , Heart Disease Risk Factors , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Risk Factors
5.
J Diabetes Investig ; 12(7): 1244-1251, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33249775

ABSTRACT

AIMS/INTRODUCTION: The predictive value of admission hyperglycemia in the long-term prognosis of acute myocardial infarction patients is still controversial. We aimed to investigate this value based on the diabetes status. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We carried out a multicenter, retrospective study of 1,288 acute myocardial infarction patients enrolled in 11 hospitals between March 2014 and June 2019 in Chengdu, China. The patients were classified into those with diabetes and those without diabetes, each was further divided into: hyperglycemia and non-hyperglycemia subgroups, according to the optimal cut-off value of the blood glucose to predict all-cause mortality during follow up. The end-points were all-cause death and major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events, including all-cause death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, vessel revascularization and non-fatal stroke. RESULTS: In the follow-up period of 15 months, we observed 210 (16.3%), 6 (0.5%), 57 (4.4%) and 34 (2.6%) cases of death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, revascularization and non-fatal stroke, respectively. The optimal cut-off values of admission blood glucose for patients with diabetes and patients without diabetes to predict all-cause mortality during follow up were 14.80 and 6.77 mmol/L, respectively. We divided patients with diabetes (n = 331) into hyperglycemia (n = 92) and non-hyperglycemia (n = 239), and patients without diabetes (n = 897) into hyperglycemia (n = 425) and non-hyperglycemia (n = 472). The cumulative rates of all-cause death and major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events among the patients in each hyperglycemia group was higher than that in the corresponding non-hyperglycemia group (P < 0.001). In patients without diabetes, admission hyperglycemia was an independent predictor of all-cause mortality and major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. CONCLUSION: Admission hyperglycemia was an independent predictor for long-term prognosis in acute myocardial infarction patients without diabetes.


Subject(s)
Hyperglycemia/mortality , Myocardial Infarction/mortality , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Acute Disease , Aged , Blood Glucose/analysis , Cardiovascular Diseases/blood , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/mortality , Cause of Death , Cerebrovascular Disorders/blood , Cerebrovascular Disorders/etiology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/mortality , China , Diabetes Mellitus/blood , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Female , Humans , Hyperglycemia/blood , Hyperglycemia/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardial Infarction/blood , Myocardial Infarction/etiology , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Stroke/blood , Stroke/etiology , Stroke/mortality , Time Factors
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