Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 12 de 12
Filter
2.
24th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, HCII 2022 ; 13522 LNCS:564-584, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2173816

ABSTRACT

The new crown pneumonia epidemic (COVID-19) has been a global pandemic for more than two years since the outbreak began in late 2019, with far-reaching effects on people's social lives as well as their mental health. At present, science and technology, bioengineering, materials and other disciplines have been integrated into protective materials, medical equipment and other items just needed for the epidemic from many aspects, but there are still not enough humane, direct technical interventions lack of human fit, not able to meet the user's sense of experience, etc., and design has the advantage of technical integration and system integration, which can assist in quickly and efficiently providing effective epidemic-related products, environments, and services solutions. This paper first analyzes and summarizes the transmission pathway and infection process of the new coronavirus, and divides the pre- and mid-epidemic period according to the data, and analyzes the design of protection and disinfection category in the pre-epidemic period, the design of treatment-related category in the mid-epidemic period, and the design of psychological healing category in the post-epidemic period. The purpose of this paper is to systematically review and analyze design research results related to the new crown epidemic at home and abroad, and then explore how design can better provide new solutions to the problems caused by the epidemic. © 2022, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

4.
Ann Oncol ; 33(8): 836-844, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1885609

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 disproportionately impacted patients with cancer as a result of direct infection, and delays in diagnosis and therapy. Oncological clinical trials are resource-intensive endeavors that could be particularly susceptible to disruption by the pandemic, but few studies have evaluated the impact of the pandemic on clinical trial conduct. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This prospective, multicenter study assesses the impact of the pandemic on therapeutic clinical trials at two large academic centers in the Northeastern United States between December 2019 and June 2021. The primary objective was to assess the enrollment on, accrual to, and activation of oncology therapeutic clinical trials during the pandemic using an institution-wide cohort of (i) new patient accruals to oncological trials, (ii) a manually curated cohort of patients with cancer, and (ii) a dataset of new trial activations. RESULTS: The institution-wide cohort included 4756 new patients enrolled to clinical trials from December 2019 to June 2021. A major decrease in the numbers of new patient accruals (-46%) was seen early in the pandemic, followed by a progressive recovery and return to higher-than-normal levels (+2.6%). A similar pattern (from -23.6% to +30.4%) was observed among 467 newly activated trials from June 2019 to June 2021. A more pronounced decline in new accruals was seen among academically sponsored trials (versus industry sponsored trials) (P < 0.05). In the manually curated cohort, which included 2361 patients with cancer, non-white patients tended to be more likely taken off trial in the early pandemic period (adjusted odds ratio: 2.60; 95% confidence interval 1.00-6.63), and substantial pandemic-related deviations were recorded. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial disruptions in clinical trial activities were observed early during the pandemic, with a gradual recovery during ensuing time periods, both from an enrollment and an activation standpoint. The observed decline was more prominent among academically sponsored trials, and racial disparities were seen among people taken off trial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Medical Oncology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Prospective Studies
5.
Clinical Cancer Research ; 27(6 SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1816924

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Patients with thoracic malignancies are susceptible to severe outcomes from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The aim of this study was to evaluate the disruption to care of patients with thoracic malignancies during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: The COVID-19 and Cancer Outcomes Study (CCOS) is a multicenter prospective cohort study comprised of adult patients with a current or past history of hematological malignancy or invasive solid tumor who had an outpatient medical oncology visit on the index week between March 2 and March 6, 2020 at the Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York, NY (MSSM) or the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, MA (DFCI). An electronic data capture platform was used to collect patient-, cancer-, and treatment-related variables during the three months prior to the index week (the baseline period) and the following three months (the pandemic period). Two-by-three contingency tables with Fisher's exact tests were computed. All tests were two-tailed and considered statistically significant for p<0.05. All analyses were done in the R statistical environment (v3.6.1). Results: The overall cohort included 2365 patients, of which 313 had thoracic malignancies, 1578 had other solid tumors, and 474 had hematological malignancies. At a median follow-up of 84 days (95% confidence interval, 82-84), 13 patients with thoracic malignancies (4.1%) had developed COVID-19 (vs. other solid: 63 [4.0%] and hematological: 52 [11.0%];p<0.001). When comparing data from the pandemic period to the baseline period, patients with thoracic malignancies had a decrease in the number of in-person outpatient visits (thoracic: 209 [66.8%] vs. other solid: 749 [47.5%] vs. hematological: 260 [54.9%];p<0.001) and an increase in the number of telehealth visits (thoracic: 126 [40.3%] vs. other solid: 465 [29.5%] vs. hematological: 168 [35.4%];p<0.001). During the pandemic period, 33 (10.5%) patients with thoracic malignancies experienced treatment delays due to the pandemic (vs. other solid: 127 [8.0%] and hematological: 79 [16.7%];p<0.001), and 26 (8.3%) patients with thoracic malignancies experienced delays in cancer imaging or diagnostic procedures (vs. other solid: 63 [4.0%] and hematological: 26 [5.5%];p=0.003). Discussion: In this prospective cohort study, patients with thoracic malignancies were not at increased risk of developing COVID-19 compared to patients with other cancers, but experienced significant cancer care disruption during the COVID-19 pandemic with a higher likelihood of decreased in-person visits and increased telehealth visits compared to patients with other malignancies. Focused efforts to ensure continuity of care for this vulnerable patient population are warranted.

6.
Traditional Medicine and Modern Medicine ; 3(1):59-64, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582952

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic is currently raging throughout the world. The ensuing crisis has acquired a multidimensional nature, affecting all levels of society, including international health legal order. For international health law, the World Health Organization (WHO) is the international institution with a core mandate in issues of global health. Moreover, the International Health Regulations (IHR) is the main legally binding instrument laying down rules for the cross-border spread of contagious diseases. Against this backdrop, this paper evaluates the issues and disputes under the current regimes of international health law. The paper then offers some thoughts by way of answers to the research questions.

8.
Journal of Xi'an Jiaotong University (Medical Sciences) ; 42(1):123-127, 2021.
Article in Chinese | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1044862

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the death time of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Methods: The death time was calculated and analyzed using individual data and aggregated data through the daily notification of the epidemic situation and the death cases published on the website of the Heath Commission of China and provinces. Results: In the 153 patients who died of COVID-19, the shortest time from onset to death was 4 days and the longest time was 50 days with the mean±standard deviation of (16.7±9.2) days. The median was 14 days and the 95% confidence interval was 4.6-42.9. The shortest time from admission to death was 1 day and the longest time was 50 days with the mean ± standard deviation of (12.1±7.8) days. The median was 11 days and the 95% confidence interval was 2-32.8. The time curve from diagnosis to death was skewed. The death time from diagnosis to death was 0 to 48 days with the mean ± standard deviation of (11.1±8.9) days. The median was 9 days, the interquartile interval was 10.5 days, and the 95% confidence interval was 0-35.4. It took 3 days from onset to admission and 1 day from admission to diagnosis. Aggregated data showed that the time from diagnosis to death of COVID-19 patients in China, China (except Hubei Province), Hubei Province and Wuhan City was 8, 9, 6 and 6 days, respectively. Conclusion: The time from diagnosis to death of COVID-19 patients varied significantly, with the median time of 6-9 days in different regions.

9.
Zhonghua Yi Xue Za Zhi ; 100(43): 3419-3424, 2020 Nov 24.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948085

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the severity of stress, anxiety, depression and insomnia during the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in adults outside Hubei Province, China. Methods: An online survey of psychological and sleep by using Questionnaire Star program from 5th to 19th February 2020 was conducted. The Impact of Event Scale-Revised was used to assess COVID-19 outbreak-related stress symptoms. Meanwhile, Questionnaires of Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the Insomnia Severity Index were respectively used to assess the severity of anxiety, depression and insomnia symptoms prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results: A total of 3 134 subjects were included. Among the included subjects, 15.5% (487), 24.9% (779), 28.7% (899) and 30.9% (968) of the subjects had COVID-19-related stress symptoms, anxiety, depression and insomnia after the COVID-19 outbreak, respectively. The severity levels of anxiety, depression and insomnia were significantly increased during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to prior to the outbreak (all P<0.01). Furthermore, the subjects' stress response to the COVID-19 outbreak was an independent risk factor for increased anxiety, depression and insomnia after the outbreak. Conclusion: The COVID-19 outbreak resulted in related stress response and widespread increase in anxiety, depression, and insomnia outside Hubei Province, China in the general population. The aggravation of anxiety, depression and insomnia is associated with stress levels. Our data demonstrate that the widespread psychological and insomnia problems in the general population need to be addressed at the early phase of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology
11.
Annals of Oncology ; 31:S1204, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-804594

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has rapidly altered cancer care. However, the ways in which it has done so and the associated impact at the individual and societal levels remains poorly defined. Methods: CCOS is a multicenter prospective cohort study designed to define the impact of the pandemic on cancer care delivery and outcomes. The CCOS cohort comprised consecutive outpatients with cancer seen at two US cancer centers from March 2 to March 6, 2020 (index visit). Data was collected at baseline, retrospectively from the preceding 3 months, and prospectively at 3-month follow up. Per patient changes in numbers of visits were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Correlates of increases in telehealth visits and decreases in in-person visits were evaluated using multivariable logistic regression models. Adjusted Odds ratios [aOR] and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were reported. Results: Of 2365 included patients, 1219 (51.6%) had a decrease in in-person visit frequency during the pandemic period relative to the preceding 3 months. Conversely, 760 (32.2%) had an increased frequency of telehealth visits (decrease in in-person and increase in telehealth visits;both p<0.01). 128 (5.4%) patients developed COVID-19. Compared to White patients, Black and Hispanic patients were less likely to have telehealth visits, had no significant change in frequency of in-person visits, and were more likely to develop COVID-19 (Table). [Formula presented] Conclusions: Significant disruptions to routine cancer care were observed during the pandemic period relative to the prior 3 months. Racial and ethnic barriers to the adoption of telehealth, and related socioeconomic factors, place these vulnerable populations simultaneously at disproportionate risk for decreased cancer-related visits and COVID infection, thereby exacerbating existing racial and ethnic health disparities. Legal entity responsible for the study: The authors. Funding: Has not received any funding. Disclosure: D. Doroshow: Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Travel/Accommodation/Expenses: Ipsen;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy: Boehringer Ingelheim;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy: Athenaeum Partners;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy: Boston Healthcare Associates. A.L. Schmidt: Travel/Accommodation/Expenses: Pfizer;Travel/Accommodation/Expenses: Astellas. Z. Bakouny: Non-remunerated activity/ies: Bristol Myers Squibb;Research grant/Funding (self): Genentech/ImCore. M.M. Awad: Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Bristol Myers Squibb;Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Lilly;Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): AstraZeneca;Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Genentech;Advisory/Consultancy: Merck;Advisory/Consultancy: Achilles;Advisory/Consultancy: AbbVie. R. Haddad: Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Bristol Myers Squibb;Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Merck;Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Pfizer;Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Genentech;Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): AstraZeneca;Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): GlaxoSmithKline. M.D. Galsky: Shareholder/Stockholder/Stock options: Rappta Therapeutics;Honoraria (self): BioMotiv;Honoraria (self): Janssen;Honoraria (self): Dendreon;Honoraria (self): Merck;Honoraria (self): GlaxoSmithKline;Honoraria (self): Lilly;Honoraria (self): Astellas Pharma;Honoraria (self): Genentech;Honoraria (self): Bristol-Myers Squibb;Honoraria (self): Novartis;Honoraria (self): Pfizer;Honoraria (self): EMD Serono;Honoraria (self): AstraZeneca;Honoraria (self): Seattle Genetics;Honoraria (self): Incyte;Honoraria (self): Alleron Therapeutics;Honoraria (self): Dracen;Honoraria (self): Inovio Pharmaceuticals;Honoraria (self): NuMab;Honoraria (self): Dragonfly Therapeutics;Honoraria (institution): Janssen Oncology;Honoraria (institution): Dendreon;Honoraria (institution): Novartis;Honoraria (institu ion): Bristol-Myers Squibb;Honoraria (institution): Merck;Honoraria (institution): AstraZeneca;Honoraria (institution): Genentech/Roche. T.K. Choueiri: Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): AstraZeneca;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Alexion;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Bayer;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): BristolMyersSquibb;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Cerulean;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Eisai;Honoraria (self), Research grant/Funding (self): Foundation Medicine;Honoraria (self), Research grant/Funding (self): Exelixis;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Ipsen;Research grant/Funding (self): 16 Tracon;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Genentech;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Roche;Honoraria (self), Research grant/Funding (self): Roche Products Limited;Honoraria (self), Research grant/Funding (self): Hoffman-LaRoche;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): GlaxoSmithKline;Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Lilly;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Merck;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Novartis;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Peloton;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Pfizer;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Prometheus labs;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Research grant/Funding (self): Corvus;Research grant/Funding (self): Calithera;Research grant/Funding (self): Analysis Group;Honoraria (self), Research grant/Funding (self): Sanofi/Aventis;Research grant/Funding (self): Takeda;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy: EMD Serono;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy: UpToDate;Honoraria (self): NCCN;Honoraria (self), Advisory/Consultancy, Dr. Choueiri reports research support from AstraZeneca, Alexion, Bayer, Bristol Myers Squibb/ER Squibb and sons LLC, Cerulean, Eisai, Foundation Medicine Inc., Exelixis, Ipsen, 16 Tracon, Genentech, Roche, Roche Products Limited, F. Hoffmann-La Roche, GlaxoSmithKline, Lilly, Merck, Novartis, Peloton, Pfizer, Prometheus Labs, Corvus, Calithera, Analysis Group, Sanofi/Aventis, Takeda;Honoraria: AstraZeneca, Alexion, Sanofi/Aventis, Bayer, Bristol Myers-Squibb/ER Squibb and sons LLC, Cerulean, Eisai, Foundation Medicine Inc., Exelixis, Genentech, Roche, Roche Products Limited, F. Hoffmann-La Roche, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck, Novartis, Peloton, Pfizer, EMD Serono, Prometheus Labs, Corvus, Ipsen, Up-to-Date, NCCN, Analysis Group, NCCN, Michael J. Hennessy (MJH) Associates, Inc (Healthcare Communications Company with several brands such as OnClive, PeerView and PER), Research to Practice, L-path, Kidney Cancer Journal, Clinical Care Options, Platform Q, Navinata Healthcare, Harborside Press, American Society of Me: Analysis Group. All other authors have declared no conflicts of interest.

12.
Chinese Journal of Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics ; 25(3):323-328, 2020.
Article in Chinese | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-683283

ABSTRACT

According to the epidemic situation in Hunan province, COVID-19: Emergency response measure for GCP in Hunan Province under the first-level response of major public health emergencies (version 2.0) as the consensus is reached by experts with years of rich experience in the field of drug clinical trials. We hope this paper can provide reference for GCP practitioners.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL