Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 21
Filter
1.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 205, 2022 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1779611

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Early identification of sepsis is mandatory. However, clinical presentation is sometimes misleading given the lack of infection signs. The objective of the study was to evaluate the impact on the 28-day mortality of the so-called "vague" presentation of sepsis. DESIGN: Single centre retrospective observational study. SETTING: One teaching hospital Intensive Care Unit. SUBJECTS: All the patients who presented at the Emergency Department (ED) and were thereafter admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with a final diagnosis of sepsis were included in this retrospective observational three-year study. They were classified as having exhibited either "vague" or explicit presentation at the ED according to previously suggested criteria. Baseline characteristics, infection main features and sepsis management were compared. The impact of a vague presentation on 28-day mortality was then evaluated. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Among the 348 included patients, 103 (29.6%) had a vague sepsis presentation. Underlying chronic diseases were more likely in those patients [e.g., peripheral arterial occlusive disease: adjusted odd ratio (aOR) = 2.01, (1.08-3.77) 95% confidence interval (CI); p = 0.028], but organ failure was less likely at the ED [SOFA score value: 4.7 (3.2) vs. 5.2 (3.1), p = 0.09]. In contrast, 28-day mortality was higher in the vague presentation group (40.8% vs. 26.9%, p = 0.011), along with longer time-to-diagnosis [18 (31) vs. 4 (11) h, p < 0.001], time-to-antibiotics [20 (32) vs. 7 (12) h, p < 0.001] and time to ICU admission [71 (159) vs. 24 (69) h, p < 0.001]. Whatever, such a vague presentation independently predicted 28-day mortality [aOR = 2.14 (1.24-3.68) 95% CI; p = 0.006]. CONCLUSIONS: Almost one third of septic patient requiring ICU had a vague presentation at the ED. Despite an apparent lower level of severity when initially assessed, those patients had an increased risk of mortality that could not be fully explained by delayed diagnosis and management of sepsis.


Subject(s)
Intensive Care Units , Sepsis , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Sepsis/diagnosis
2.
JAMA ; 327(11): 1042-1050, 2022 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763144

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: Persistent physical and mental disorders are frequent in survivors of COVID-19-related acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, data on these disorders among family members are scarce. OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between patient hospitalization for COVID-19 ARDS vs ARDS from other causes and the risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related symptoms in family members. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Prospective cohort study in 23 intensive care units (ICUs) in France (January 2020 to June 2020 with final follow-up ending in October 2020). ARDS survivors and family members (1 family member per patient) were enrolled. EXPOSURES: Family members of patients hospitalized for ARDS due to COVID-19 vs ARDS due to other causes. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcome was family member symptoms of PTSD at 90 days after ICU discharge, measured by the Impact of Events Scale-Revised (score range, 0 [best] to 88 [worst]; presence of PTSD symptoms defined by score >22). Secondary outcomes were family member symptoms of anxiety and depression at 90 days assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (score range, 0 [best] to 42 [worst]; presence of anxiety or depression symptoms defined by subscale scores ≥7). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to determine the association between COVID-19 status and outcomes. RESULTS: Among 602 family members and 307 patients prospectively enrolled, 517 (86%) family members (median [IQR] age, 51 [40-63] years; 72% women; 48% spouses; 26% bereaved because of the study patient's death; 303 [50%] family members of COVID-19 patients) and 273 (89%) patients (median [IQR] age, 61 [50-69] years; 34% women; 181 [59%] with COVID-19) completed the day-90 assessment. Compared with non-COVID-19 ARDS, family members of patients with COVID-19 ARDS had a significantly higher prevalence of symptoms of PTSD (35% [103/293] vs 19% [40/211]; difference, 16% [95% CI, 8%-24%]; P < .001), symptoms of anxiety (41% [121/294] vs 34% [70/207]; difference, 8% [95% CI, 0%-16%]; P= .05), and symptoms of depression (31% [91/291] vs 18% [37/209]; difference, 13% [95% CI, 6%-21%]; P< .001). In multivariable models adjusting for age, sex, and level of social support, COVID-19 ARDS was significantly associated with increased risk of PTSD-related symptoms in family members (odds ratio, 2.05 [95% CI, 1.30 to 3.23]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Among family members of patients hospitalized in the ICU with ARDS, COVID-19 disease, as compared with other causes of ARDS, was significantly associated with increased risk of symptoms of PTSD at 90 days after ICU discharge. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04341519.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Family Health , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Adult , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
3.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0264287, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1724849

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During the COVID pandemic, many hospitals had to mobilize reinforcement healthcare workers, especially in intensive care (ICUs). We investigated the perceptions and experiences of reinforcement workers deployed to ICUs, and the impact of deployment on their personal and professional lives. METHODS: For this qualitative study, a random sample of 30 reinforcement workers was drawn from 4 centres participating in the larger PsyCOVID-ICU study. Individual semi-structured interviews were held, recorded, transcribed and analyzed by thematic analysis. RESULTS: Thirty interviews were performed from April to May 2021 (22 nurses, 2 anesthesiology nurses, 6 nurses' aides). Average age was 36.8±9.5 years; 7 participants had no ICU experience. Four major themes emerged, namely: (1) Difficulties with integration, especially for those with no ICU experience; (2) lack of training; (3) difficulties with management, notably a feeling of insufficient communication; (4) Mental distress relating to the unusual work and fear of contaminating their entourage. CONCLUSION: Healthcare workers deployed as reinforcements to ICUs at the height of the pandemic had a unique experience of the crisis, and identified important gaps in organisation and preparation. They also suffered from a marked lack of training, given the stakes in the management of critically ill patients in the ICU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emotions , Health Personnel/psychology , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
4.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263666, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690717

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to significant re-organisation of healthcare delivery in hospitals, with repercussions on all professionals working in healthcare. We aimed to assess the impact of the pandemic on the mental health of professionals working in health care institutions and to identify individual and environmental factors influencing the risk of mental health disorders. From 4 June to 22 September 2020, a total of 4370 professionals responded to an online questionnaire evaluating psychological distress, severity of post-traumatic stress symptoms, stress factors, and coping strategies. About 57% of the professionals suffered from psychological distress, and 21% showed symptoms of potential post-traumatic stress. Professionals working in radiology, those working in quality/hygiene/security and nurses' aides were the most affected groups. The media focus on the crisis, and a high workload were the most prevalent stress factors, followed by uncertainty regarding the possibility of containing the epidemic, the constantly changing hygiene recommendations/protocols, and the lack of personal protective equipment. The use of coping strategies, notably positive thinking, helped to mitigate the relation between perceived stress and mental health disorders. The COVID-19 pandemic has had far-reaching negative repercussions for all professionals, with some sectors more markedly affected. To prevent mental health disorders in professionals during a public health crisis, support services and management strategies within hospitals should take account of the importance of positive thinking and social support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety , Delivery of Health Care , France/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , Social Support , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload
5.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-317933

ABSTRACT

Background: The pathogenesis of severe COVID-19 is frequently associated with an uncontrolled inflammatory response. Severe forms of COVID-19 appear to be more frequent in obese patients, but an association with metabolic disorders is not established. Here, we focused on lipoprotein metabolism in patients hospitalized for severe pneumonia, depending on COVID-19 status.Methods: Thirty-four non-COVID-19 and 27 COVID-19 patients with severe pneumonia were enrolled. Most of them required intensive care. Plasma lipid levels, lipoprotein metabolism, and clinical and biological features were assessed.Findings: Despite similar initial metabolic comorbidities and respiratory severity, COVID-19 patients displayed a lower acute phase response with higher plasmatic concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs). NEFA profiling was characterised by higher level of polyunsaturated NEFAs (mainly linoleic and arachidonic acids) in COVID-19 patients, suggesting an increase in phospholipase A2 activity. Multivariable analysis showed that among severe pneumonia, COVID-19-associated pneumonia was associated with higher NEFAs, lower apolipoprotein E and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, independently of body mass index, sequential organ failure (SOFA) score, and C-reactive protein levels.Trial Registration: NCT04435223Funding Statement: This study was supported by grant (MN) from the COVIDOLIP – AOIc2020 (Institutional grant), by the INSERM (Centre de Recherche UMR 1231) and the ANR Investissements d’Avenir Grant (ANR-11 LABX-0021-01, Labex Lipstic).Declaration of Interest: The authors declare no existing conflict of interest.Ethics Approval Statement: The study fulfilled legal and ethics requirements: Approval was obtained from the CPP (Comité de Protection des Personnes SUD MEDITERRANEE V;2017-A03404-49) for the original study and an amendment was obtained to include supplementary patients with severe COVID-19. All subjects (or their legal representatives) received written information and provided their consent to participate.

6.
European Journal of Psychotraumatology ; 13(1), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1661225

ABSTRACT

Background Intensive care units (ICU) are among the healthcare services most affected by the COVID-19 crisis. Stressors related to insecurity, unpredictability, patient death and family distress are significant, and put healthcare workers (HCWs) at high risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The aims of this study were to measure the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder in HCWs and to identify risk factors and protective factors during the epidemic in France. Methods During the first peak of the epidemic (from 22 April to 13 May 2020), we assessed sources of stress (PS-ICU scale), mental health (GHQ-12) and coping strategies (Brief-COPE). Three months later (03 June to 6 July 2020), PTSD was assessed using the IES-R scale, with additional questions about sources of support. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires administered online. Results Among 2153 professionals who participated in the study, 20.6% suffered from potential PTSD, mostly intrusion symptoms. Risk factors for the development of PTSD were having experienced additional difficult events during the crisis, having a high level of psychological distress, a high level of perceived stress related to the workload and human resources issues, the emotional burden related to the patient and family, and stressors specific to COVID-19 during the first peak of the crisis. The use of positive thinking coping strategies decreased the relationship between perceived stress and the presence of PTSD, while social support seeking strategies increased the relationship. Finally, the HCWs preferred to use support from colleagues, relatives and/or a psychologist, and very few used the telephone hotlines. Conclusion The epidemic has had a strong traumatic impact on intensive care HCWs. Given the risk of PTSD, we need to consider implementing easily-accessible support services that focus on positive thinking coping strategies, during and after the crisis. HIGHLIGHTS The risk of PTSD is high among intensive care professionals. Perceived stress and psychological distress during the first peak of crisis increased the likelihood of subsequent PTSD. Support for professionals should be easily available and focused on positive thinking strategies.

7.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 13(1): 2011603, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650607

ABSTRACT

Background: Intensive care units (ICU) are among the healthcare services most affected by the COVID-19 crisis. Stressors related to insecurity, unpredictability, patient death and family distress are significant, and put healthcare workers (HCWs) at high risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The aims of this study were to measure the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder in HCWs and to identify risk factors and protective factors during the epidemic in France. Methods: During the first peak of the epidemic (from 22 April to 13 May 2020), we assessed sources of stress (PS-ICU scale), mental health (GHQ-12) and coping strategies (Brief-COPE). Three months later (03 June to 6 July 2020), PTSD was assessed using the IES-R scale, with additional questions about sources of support. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires administered online. Results: Among 2153 professionals who participated in the study, 20.6% suffered from potential PTSD, mostly intrusion symptoms. Risk factors for the development of PTSD were having experienced additional difficult events during the crisis, having a high level of psychological distress, a high level of perceived stress related to the workload and human resources issues, the emotional burden related to the patient and family, and stressors specific to COVID-19 during the first peak of the crisis. The use of positive thinking coping strategies decreased the relationship between perceived stress and the presence of PTSD, while social support seeking strategies increased the relationship. Finally, the HCWs preferred to use support from colleagues, relatives and/or a psychologist, and very few used the telephone hotlines. Conclusion: The epidemic has had a strong traumatic impact on intensive care HCWs. Given the risk of PTSD, we need to consider implementing easily-accessible support services that focus on positive thinking coping strategies, during and after the crisis.


Antecedentes: Las unidades de cuidados intensivos (UCIs) se encuentran dentro de los servicios de salud más comprometidos por la crisis de la COVID-19. Los factores estresantes asociados a la inseguridad, la impredecibilidad, el fallecimiento de pacientes y la angustia familiar son considerables y colocan a los trabajadores de salud (TS) en un alto riesgo de trastorno de estrés postraumático (TEPT). Los objetivos de este estudio fueron el determinar la prevalencia del trastorno por estrés postraumático en TS e identificar los factores de riesgo y los factores protectores durante la epidemia en Francia.Métodos: Durante la primera ola de la epidemia (del 22 de abril al 13 de mayo del 2020) evaluamos fuentes de estrés (mediante la escala de percepción de factores estresantes en la UCI; PS-ICU en sus siglas en inglés), salud mental (mediante el cuestionario de salud general de 12 ítems; GHQ-12 en sus siglas en inglés) y estrategias de afrontamiento (mediante el inventario de la orientación del afrontamiento ante los problemas experimentados; Brief-COPE en sus siglas en inglés). Tres meses después (del 3 de junio al 6 de julio del 2020) se evaluó el TEPT mediante la escala de impacto del evento (IES-R en sus siglas en inglés) y con preguntas adicionales respecto a las fuentes de soporte. Se recolectó la información mediante cuestionarios de autoreporte realizados en línea.Resultados: De los 2.153 profesionales que participaron en el estudio, 20,6% padecían un potencial TEPT, predominando los síntomas intrusivos. Los factores de riesgo para el desarrollo del TEPT fueron el haber experimentado eventos difíciles adicionales durante la crisis, el tener un nivel elevado de angustia psicológica, un nivel alto de estrés percibido asociado a la carga laboral y a situaciones asociadas a los recursos humanos, la carga emocional relacionada al paciente y su familia, y los factores estresantes específicos de la COVID-19 durante la primera ola de la crisis. El uso del pensamiento positivo como estrategia de afrontamiento disminuía la relación entre el estrés percibido y la presencia del TEPT, mientras que las estrategias relacionadas con la búsqueda de soporte social incrementaban esta relación. Finalmente, los TS preferían emplear el soporte brindado por sus colegas, familiares y/o un psicólogo, mientras que muy pocos preferían el uso de líneas telefónicas de crisis.Conclusión: La epidemia ha tenido un fuerte impacto traumático sobre los TS de las UCIs. Dado el riesgo de TEPT, se necesita considerar la implementación de servicios de apoyo de fácil acceso que se enfoquen en el empleo del pensamiento positivo como estrategia de afrontamiento, tanto durante como después de la crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , France/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Occupational Stress/psychology , Pandemics , Protective Factors , Risk Factors , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e048591, 2021 09 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495462

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Pre-emptive inhaled antibiotics may be effective to reduce the occurrence of ventilator-associated pneumonia among critically ill patients. Meta-analysis of small sample size trials showed a favourable signal. Inhaled antibiotics are associated with a reduced emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the benefit of a 3-day course of inhaled antibiotics among patients undergoing invasive mechanical ventilation for more than 3 days on the occurrence of ventilator-associated pneumonia. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Academic, investigator-initiated, parallel two group arms, double-blind, multicentre superiority randomised controlled trial. Patients invasively ventilated more than 3 days will be randomised to receive 20 mg/kg inhaled amikacin daily for 3 days or inhaled placebo (0.9% Sodium Chloride). Occurrence of ventilator-associated pneumonia will be recorded based on a standardised diagnostic framework from randomisation to day 28 and adjudicated by a centralised blinded committee. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The protocol and amendments have been approved by the regional ethics review board and French competent authorities (Comité de protection des personnes Ouest I, No.2016-R29). All patients will be included after informed consent according to French law. Results will be disseminated in international scientific journals. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBERS: EudraCT 2016-001054-17 and NCT03149640.


Subject(s)
Amikacin , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated , Administration, Inhalation , Amikacin/administration & dosage , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/prevention & control , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Treatment Outcome
9.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 675191, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369670

ABSTRACT

Rationale: COVID-19 displays distinct characteristics that suggest a unique pathogenesis. The objective of this study was to compare biomarkers of coagulopathy and outcomes in COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients with severe pneumonia. Methods: Thirty-six non-COVID-19 and 27 COVID-19 non-immunocompromised patients with severe pneumonia were prospectively enrolled, most requiring intensive care. Clinical and biological characteristics (including plasma biomarkers of coagulopathy) were compared. Results: At similar baseline severity, COVID-19 patients required mechanical ventilation (MV) for significantly longer than non-COVID-19 patients (p = 0.0049) and more frequently developed venous thrombotic complications (p = 0.031). COVID-19 patients had significantly higher plasma concentrations of soluble VCAM1 (sVCAM1) (5,739 ± 3,293 vs. 3,700 ± 2,124 ng/ml; p = 0.009), but lower levels of D-dimers, vWF-A2, sICAM1, sTREM1, VEGF, and P-selectin, compared to non-COVID-19 patients. Principal component analysis identified two main patterns, with a clear distinction between non-COVID-19 and COVID-19 patients. Multivariable regression analysis confirmed that sVCAM1 rising levels were independently associated with a longer duration of MV. Finally, we identified close correlations between sVCAM1 and some features of COVID-19 immune dysregulation (ie. CXCL10, GM-CSF, and IL-10). Conclusion: We identified specific features of the coagulopathy signature in severe COVID-19 patients, with higher plasma sVCAM1 levels, that were independently associated with the longer duration of mechanical ventilation. Clinical Trial Registration:ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier: NCT03505281.

10.
Intensive Care Med ; 47(6): 653-664, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263138

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The effect of the routine use of a stylet during tracheal intubation on first-attempt intubation success is unclear. We hypothesised that the first-attempt intubation success rate would be higher with tracheal tube + stylet than with tracheal tube alone. METHODS: In this multicentre randomised controlled trial, conducted in 32 intensive care units, we randomly assigned patients to tracheal tube + stylet or tracheal tube alone (i.e. without stylet). The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with first-attempt intubation success. The secondary outcome was the proportion of patients with complications related to tracheal intubation. Serious adverse events, i.e., traumatic injuries related to tracheal intubation, were evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 999 patients were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis: 501 (50%) to tracheal tube + stylet and 498 (50%) to tracheal tube alone. First-attempt intubation success occurred in 392 patients (78.2%) in the tracheal tube + stylet group and in 356 (71.5%) in the tracheal tube alone group (absolute risk difference, 6.7; 95%CI 1.4-12.1; relative risk, 1.10; 95%CI 1.02-1.18; P = 0.01). A total of 194 patients (38.7%) in the tracheal tube + stylet group had complications related to tracheal intubation, as compared with 200 patients (40.2%) in the tracheal tube alone group (absolute risk difference, - 1.5; 95%CI - 7.5 to 4.6; relative risk, 0.96; 95%CI 0.83-1.12; P = 0.64). The incidence of serious adverse events was 4.0% and 3.6%, respectively (absolute risk difference, 0.4; 95%CI, - 2.0 to 2.8; relative risk, 1.10; 95%CI 0.59-2.06. P = 0.76). CONCLUSIONS: Among critically ill adults undergoing tracheal intubation, using a stylet improves first-attempt intubation success.


Subject(s)
Critical Illness , Intubation, Intratracheal , Adult , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Intubation, Intratracheal/adverse effects
11.
BMJ Open ; 11(5): e045041, 2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259009

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: International guidelines include early nutritional support (≤48 hour after admission), 20-25 kcal/kg/day, and 1.2-2 g/kg/day protein at the acute phase of critical illness. Recent data challenge the appropriateness of providing standard amounts of calories and protein during acute critical illness. Restricting calorie and protein intakes seemed beneficial, suggesting a role for metabolic pathways such as autophagy, a potential key mechanism in safeguarding cellular integrity, notably in the muscle, during critical illness. However, the optimal calorie and protein supply at the acute phase of severe critical illness remains unknown. NUTRIREA-3 will be the first trial to compare standard calorie and protein feeding complying with guidelines to low-calorie low-protein feeding. We hypothesised that nutritional support with calorie and protein restriction during acute critical illness decreased day 90 mortality and/or dependency on intensive care unit (ICU) management in mechanically ventilated patients receiving vasoactive amine therapy for shock, compared with standard calorie and protein targets. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: NUTRIREA-3 is a randomised, controlled, multicentre, open-label trial comparing two parallel groups of patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation and vasoactive amine therapy for shock and given early nutritional support according to one of two strategies: early calorie-protein restriction (6 kcal/kg/day-0.2-0.4 g/kg/day) or standard calorie-protein targets (25 kcal/kg/day, 1.0-1.3 g/kg/day) at the acute phase defined as the first 7 days in the ICU. We will include 3044 patients in 61 French ICUs. Two primary end-points will be evaluated: day 90 mortality and time to ICU discharge readiness. The trial will be considered positive if significant between-group differences are found for one or both alternative primary endpoints. Secondary outcomes include hospital-acquired infections and nutritional, clinical and functional outcomes. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The NUTRIREA-3 study has been approved by the appropriate ethics committee. Patients are included after informed consent. Results will be submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03573739.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diet, Protein-Restricted , Adult , Critical Illness , Humans , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Heart Lung ; 50(5): 700-705, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252961

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lung ultrasound can accurately detect pandemic coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pulmonary lesions. A lung ultrasound score (LUS) was developed to improve reproducibility of the technique. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical value of LUS monitoring to guide COVID-19-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) management. METHODS: We conducted a single center, prospective observational study, including all patients admitted with COVID-19-associated ARDS between March and April 2020. A systematic daily LUS evaluation was performed. RESULTS: Thirty-three consecutive patients were included. LUS was significantly and negatively correlated to PaO2/FIO2. LUS increased significantly over time in non-survivors compared to survivors. LUS increased in 83% of ventilatory associated pneumonia (VAP) episodes, when compared to the previous LUS evaluation. LUS was not significantly higher in patients presenting post-extubation respiratory failure. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, our study demonstrates that LUS variations are correlated to disease severity and progression, and LUS monitoring could contribute to the early diagnosis of VAPs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Disease Progression , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/diagnosis , Reproducibility of Results , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Ultrasonography
13.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 10824, 2021 05 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242049

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pneumonia has specific features and outcomes that suggests a unique immunopathogenesis. Severe forms of COVID-19 appear to be more frequent in obese patients, but an association with metabolic disorders is not established. Here, we focused on lipoprotein metabolism in patients hospitalized for severe pneumonia, depending on COVID-19 status. Thirty-four non-COVID-19 and 27 COVID-19 patients with severe pneumonia were enrolled. Most of them required intensive care. Plasma lipid levels, lipoprotein metabolism, and clinical and biological (including plasma cytokines) features were assessed. Despite similar initial metabolic comorbidities and respiratory severity, COVID-19 patients displayed a lower acute phase response but higher plasmatic concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs). NEFA profiling was characterised by higher level of polyunsaturated NEFAs (mainly linoleic and arachidonic acids) in COVID-19 patients. Multivariable analysis showed that among severe pneumonia, COVID-19-associated pneumonia was associated with higher NEFAs, lower apolipoprotein E and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, independently of body mass index, sequential organ failure (SOFA) score, and C-reactive protein levels. NEFAs and PUFAs concentrations were negatively correlated with the number of ventilator-free days. Among hospitalized patients with severe pneumonia, COVID-19 is independently associated with higher NEFAs (mainly linoleic and arachidonic acids) and lower apolipoprotein E and HDL concentrations. These features might act as mediators in COVID-19 pathogenesis and emerge as new therapeutic targets. Further investigations are required to define the role of NEFAs in the pathogenesis and the dysregulated immune response associated with COVID-19.Trial registration: NCT04435223.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Fatty Acids, Nonesterified/blood , Aged , Apolipoproteins E/blood , Arachidonic Acids/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Cholesterol, HDL/blood , Cytokines/blood , Female , Humans , Linoleic Acids/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Principal Component Analysis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
14.
Ann Intensive Care ; 11(1): 66, 2021 Apr 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1229000

ABSTRACT

Intensive care unit professionals have experience in critical care and its proportionality, collegial decision-making, withholding or withdrawal of treatment deemed futile, and communication with patients' relatives. These elements rely on ethical values from which we must not deviate in a pandemic situation. The recommendations made by the Ethics Commission of the French Intensive Care Society reflect an approach of responsibility and solidarity towards our citizens regarding the potential impact of a pandemic on critical care resources in France, with the fundamental requirement of respect for human dignity and equal access to health care for all.

17.
19.
J Transl Med ; 18(1): 457, 2020 12 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-958039

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although immune modulation is a promising therapeutic avenue in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the most relevant targets remain to be found. COVID-19 has peculiar characteristics and outcomes, suggesting a unique immunopathogenesis. METHODS: Thirty-six immunocompetent non-COVID-19 and 27 COVID-19 patients with severe pneumonia were prospectively enrolled in a single center, most requiring intensive care. Clinical and biological characteristics (including T cell phenotype and function and plasma concentrations of 30 cytokines) and outcomes were compared. RESULTS: At similar baseline respiratory severity, COVID-19 patients required mechanical ventilation for significantly longer than non-COVID-19 patients (15 [7-22] vs. 4 (0-15) days; p = 0.0049). COVID-19 patients had lower levels of most classical inflammatory cytokines (G-CSF, CCL20, IL-1ß, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, TNF-α, TGF-ß), but higher plasma concentrations of CXCL10, GM-CSF and CCL5, compared to non-COVID-19 patients. COVID-19 patients displayed similar T-cell exhaustion to non-COVID-19 patients, but with a more unbalanced inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cytokine response (IL-6/IL-10 and TNF-α/IL-10 ratios). Principal component analysis identified two main patterns, with a clear distinction between non-COVID-19 and COVID-19 patients. Multivariate regression analysis confirmed that GM-CSF, CXCL10 and IL-10 levels were independently associated with the duration of mechanical ventilation. CONCLUSION: We identified a unique cytokine response, with higher plasma GM-CSF and CXCL10 in COVID-19 patients that were independently associated with the longer duration of mechanical ventilation. These cytokines could represent the dysregulated immune response in severe COVID-19, as well as promising therapeutic targets. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03505281.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate/physiology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Immunophenotyping , Lymphocyte Activation/physiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
20.
Crit Care ; 24(1): 632, 2020 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-901906

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19-related ARDS has unique features when compared with ARDS from other origins, suggesting a distinctive inflammatory pathogenesis. Data regarding the host response within the lung are sparse. The objective is to compare alveolar and systemic inflammation response patterns, mitochondrial alarmin release, and outcomes according to ARDS etiology (i.e., COVID-19 vs. non-COVID-19). METHODS: Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma were obtained from 7 control, 7 non-COVID-19 ARDS, and 14 COVID-19 ARDS patients. Clinical data, plasma, and epithelial lining fluid (ELF) concentrations of 45 inflammatory mediators and cell-free mitochondrial DNA were measured and compared. RESULTS: COVID-19 ARDS patients required mechanical ventilation (MV) for significantly longer, even after adjustment for potential confounders. There was a trend toward higher concentrations of plasma CCL5, CXCL2, CXCL10, CD40 ligand, IL-10, and GM-CSF, and ELF concentrations of CXCL1, CXCL10, granzyme B, TRAIL, and EGF in the COVID-19 ARDS group compared with the non-COVID-19 ARDS group. Plasma and ELF CXCL10 concentrations were independently associated with the number of ventilator-free days, without correlation between ELF CXCL-10 and viral load. Mitochondrial DNA plasma and ELF concentrations were elevated in all ARDS patients, with no differences between the two groups. ELF concentrations of mitochondrial DNA were correlated with alveolar cell counts, as well as IL-8 and IL-1ß concentrations. CONCLUSION: CXCL10 could be one key mediator involved in the dysregulated immune response. It should be evaluated as a candidate biomarker that may predict the duration of MV in COVID-19 ARDS patients. Targeting the CXCL10-CXCR3 axis could also be considered as a new therapeutic approach. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03955887.


Subject(s)
Chemokine CXCL10/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Time Factors
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL