Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Sex Transm Dis ; 2022 Jul 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1948595

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic adversely affected sexual health services. Given the burden of sexually transmitted infections (STI) on sexual and gender minorities (SGM), we estimated incidence of self-reported STI diagnoses and factors associated with STI diagnoses among SGMs during the pandemic's first year. METHODS: A cohort of 426 SGM persons, aged ≥25 years, recruited in Chicago, Milwaukee, Detroit, Minneapolis, and Houston completed five online surveys from April 2020 to February 2021. Persons self-reported on each survey all healthcare provider STI diagnoses. Kaplan-Meier was used to estimate the cumulative risk of STI diagnoses, stratified by HIV status. Factors associated with STI diagnoses were assessed with a longitudinal negative binomial regression. RESULTS: Median age was 37 years and 27.0% were persons living with HIV (PLH). Participants reported 63 STIs for a cumulative incidence for PLH and HIV-negative persons of 0.19 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.13-0.29) and 0.12 (95%CI 0.09-0.17), respectively. Regardless of HIV, a younger age and changes in healthcare use were associated with STI diagnoses. Among HIV-negative persons, the rate of STI diagnoses was higher in Houston than the Midwest cities (adjusted relative risk (aRR) 2.37, 95%CI 1.08-5.20). Among PLH, a decrease in healthcare use was also associated with STI diagnoses (aRR 3.53, 95%CI 1.01-12.32 vs no change in healthcare services), as was Hispanic ethnicity and using a dating app to meet a sex partner. CONCLUSIONS: Factors associated with STI diagnoses during the COVID-19 pandemic generally reflected factors associated with STI incidence before the pandemic like geography, HIV, age, and ethnicity.

2.
Arch Sex Behav ; 51(1): 303-314, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1838357

ABSTRACT

Prior research has highlighted the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV prevention services within the U.S., but few studies have explored this impact through an exploratory, qualitative lens. In this study, we sought to highlight the voices of young sexual minority men (YSMM) 17-24 years old and explored the perceived impact of the pandemic on HIV prevention among a diverse, nationwide sample of YSMM who participated in synchronous online focus group discussions between April and September 2020. Forty-one YSMM described the negative effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV testing and prevention services, including limited and disrupted access to HIV testing, HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and HIV post-exposure prophylaxis. COVID-19-related challenges were compounded by ongoing, pre-COVID-19 barriers experienced by YSMM in the U.S. For instance, many YSMM relocated back home with family, causing men to avoid HIV prevention services for fear of outing themselves to relatives. YSMM also worried about placing their family at increased risk of COVID-19 by attending clinical appointments. YSMM who did seek HIV prevention services, including access to PrEP, experienced significant barriers, including limited appointment availability and services not tailored to YSMM. Further efforts are needed to support YSMM re-engaging in HIV prevention during and after the COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Adolescent , Adult , Focus Groups , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/prevention & control , HIV Testing , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
3.
J Womens Health (Larchmt) ; 31(4): 487-494, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806232

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus pandemic accelerated academic medicine into the frontline of research and clinical work, leaving some faculty exhausted, and others with unanticipated time off. Women were particularly vulnerable, having increased responsibilities in both academic work and caregiving. Methods: The authors sought to determine faculty's responses to the pandemic, seeking predictors of accelerated versus decelerated academic productivity and work-life balance. In this survey of 424 faculty from a private Midwest academic medical center completed in August-September 2020, faculty rated multiple factors both "pre-COVID" and "during the COVID-19 lockdown," and a change score was calculated. Results: In a binary logistic regression model comparing faculty whose self-rated academic productivity increased with those whose productivity decreased, the authors found that controlling for multiple factors, men were more than twice as likely to be in the accelerated productivity group as women. In a similar model comparing partnered faculty whose self-rated work-life balance increased with partnered faculty whose work-life balance decreased, being in the positive work-life balance group was predicted by increased academic productivity, increased job stress, and having higher job priority than your partner. Conclusions: While the COVID-19 pandemic placed huge stressors on academic medical faculty, pandemic placed huge stressors on academic medical faculty, some experienced gains in productivity and work-life balance, with potential to widen the gender gap. As academic medicine evolves post-COVID, leaders should be aware that productivity and work-life balance predict each other, and that these factors have connections to work location, stress, and relationship dynamics, emphasizing the inseparable connections between work and life success.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Faculty, Medical , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Sex Factors
4.
J Surg Educ ; 2021 Nov 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1531620

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: While COVID-19 had a profound impact on healthcare, its effects on medical students are less clear. This study explored the effects of COVID-19 safety measures on medical students' specialty selection and career choices. It further considers the potential differential effects of COVID by gender. DESIGN: Between June and November 2020 at a Midwestern medical university, medical students with an anticipated graduation in 2021 through 2023 participated in virtual focus group sessions, which explored students' transition to remote learning during COVID-19, perception of gender bias within medical education, and personal and professional goals. Nine focus groups were held, with two to six students per session (n = 22). Focus groups were video recorded, transcribed verbatim, and data were deidentified. Transcripts were coded and analyzed using consensual qualitative analysis to identify themes. RESULTS: Our analysis captured 3 themes: (1) Impact of Institutional Decision-Making due to COVID-19, (2) Impact of Unstructured Time on Professional and Personal Decision Making, and (3) Impact of Societal Pressures, Gender Bias, and Mentorship on Career Planning. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 disrupted important learning opportunities for medical students. Mentorship and shadowing are critical in helping students make career and specialty decisions, particularly for women. The loss of these opportunities may have lasting career impacts for all students.

5.
AIDS Behav ; 25(1): 1-8, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-754436

ABSTRACT

As communities struggle with how to cope with the health and social consequences of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), sexual and gender minority men living with or affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic have important insights into how to cope with uncertainty, public health protocols, and grief. We recruited sexual and gender minority men using online networking apps from April 18-24, 2020 to enroll a longitudinal cohort. We analyzed baseline qualitative data from open-ended responses using content analysis to examine how the HIV/AIDS epidemic has helped sexual minority men with the current COVID-19 pandemic. Of the 437 participants who completed the survey, 155 (35%) indicated that HIV/AIDS had helped them cope with COVID-19. Free-response data from those 135 of those participants clustered around four themes: (1) experience having lived through a pandemic, (2) experience coping with stigma, (3) familiarity with public health protocols, and (4) belief in collective action. Based on the experiences of these men, public health approaches centered on resilience and collective action could be particularly helpful in responding and coping with COVID-19-especially if the pandemic persists over longer periods of time.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Adult , Aged , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Sexual Behavior , Social Stigma
6.
AIDS Behav ; 24(12): 3291-3294, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614474
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL