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2.
Acta Neurol Scand ; 144(1): 99-108, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203828

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the medium-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on epilepsy patients, focusing on psychological effects and seizure control. METHODS: Prospective follow-up study to evaluate the medium-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on a cohort of epilepsy patients from a tertiary hospital previously surveyed during the first peak of the pandemic. Between July 1, 2020, and August 30, 2020, the patients answered an online 19-item questionnaire, HADS, and PSIQ scales. Short- and medium-term effects of the pandemic confinement and the perception of telemedicine were compared. RESULTS: 153 patients completed the questionnaire, mean ± SD age, 47.6 ± 19.3 years; 49.7% women. Depression was reported by 43 patients, significantly more prevalent than in the short-term analysis (29.2% vs. 19.7%; p = .038). Anxiety (38.1% vs. 36.1%; p = 0.749) and insomnia (28.9% vs. 30.9%, p = .761) remained highly prevalent. Seventeen patients reported an increase in seizure frequency (11.1% vs. 9.1%, p = .515). The three factors independently associated with an increase in seizure frequency in the medium term were drug-resistant epilepsy (odds ratio [OR] = 8.2, 95% CI 2.06-32.52), depression (OR = 6.46, 95% CI 1.80-23.11), and a reduction in income (OR = 5.47, 95% CI 1.51-19.88). A higher proportion of patients found telemedicine unsatisfactory (11.2% vs. 2.4%), and a lower percentage (44.8% vs. 56.8%) found it very satisfactory (p = .005). CONCLUSIONS: Depression rates increased significantly after the first wave. Depression, drug-resistant epilepsy, and a reduction in family income were independent risk factors for an increased seizure frequency. Perception of telemedicine worsened, indicating need for re-adaptation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Socioeconomic Factors
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(7)2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167577

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) forced a stoppage in the 2019/2020 season of LaLiga™, possibly influencing performance indicators in the return to competition. Therefore, here, we evaluated whether the stoppage due to the coronavirus 2019 disease (COVID-19) lockdown influenced physical performance compared to the start of LaLigaTM in terms of high-intensity efforts. Using a semi-automatic, multiple-camera system, running activities during 22 matches were analyzed. We compared the first 11 matches of the season (pre-lockdown) with the 11 matches just after the restart of LaLiga™ (post-lockdown). The results showed higher (p < 0.05) performance in the pre-lockdown period compared with the post-lockdown period, including in medium-speed running (14.1-21 km/h), high-speed running (21.1-24 km/h), and sprinting speed running distances (>24 km/h). However, the number of accelerations/min and decelerations/min were significantly higher during the post-lockdown period. Therefore, we conclude that the stoppage due to the COVID-19 lockdown generated lower physical performance in the post-lockdown period compared with the pre-lockdown period, most likely due to the accumulation of matches (congested schedules).


Subject(s)
Athletic Performance , COVID-19 , Soccer , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Thrombosis Update ; : 100029, 2020.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-989353

ABSTRACT

Background Hospitalized patients with COVID-19 and raised D-dimer levels have high rates of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Methods We used data from hospitalized patients with COVID-19 that were tested for pulmonary embolism (PE) or deep vein thrombosis (DVT) because of raised D-dimer levels. We aimed to identify patients at increased risk for VTE. Results From March 25 to July 5th 2020, 1,306 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 and raised D-dimer levels underwent testing for VTE in 12 centers. In all, 171 of 714 (24%) had PE, and 161 of 810 (20%) had DVT. The median time elapsed from admission to VTE testing was 12 days, and the median time from D-dimer measurement to testing 2 days. Most patients with VTE were men (62%), mean age was 62±15 years, 45% were in an intensive care unit. Overall, 681 patients (52%) received VTE prophylaxis with standard doses, 241 (18%) with intermediate doses and 100 (7.7%) with therapeutic doses of anticoagulants. On multivariable analysis, patients with D-dimer levels >20 times the upper normal range (19% of the whole cohort) were at increased risk for VTE (odds ratio [OR]: 3.24;95%CI: 2.18-4.83), as were those with a platelet count <100,000/μL (OR: 4.17;95%CI: 1.72-10.0). Conclusions Hospitalized patients with COVID-19 and D-dimer levels >20 times the upper normal range were at an increased risk for VTE. This may help to identify what patients could likely benefit from the use of higher than recommended doses of anticoagulants for VTE prophylaxis.

5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(20)2020 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-983025

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this work is to evaluate the effects of confinement due to COVID-19 isolation on visual function, considering insufficient convergence as one of the possible effects of living the whole day in a reduced space. We pass a Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey (CISS) among 235 people to detect their habits before and after 25 confinement days. The data collection protocol consisted on a Google forms questionnaire included two parts: the first with current data (isolation period) and a second with pre-isolation period data. Differences between the pre-isolation and isolation period were calculated using the related paired T-tests. When statistically significant differences were found, the effect size was estimated using the Cohen's d index (d). The reduction in physical activity levels during confinement were related to the increase in total number of minutes of screen consumption from 433.49 min to 623.97 min per day (d = 0.67; 44.01%). The CISS scores were increased by more than 43% during confinement. The increase in convergence insufficiency was 100% after the studied isolation period of 25 days. The 92.19% increase in television use during 25 days of confinement is not responsible for the increase in convergence insufficiency. However, due to the increase in the use of PCs in this period, there is a notable increase in convergence insufficiency. Therefore, we can conclude that not all increases in tasks with electronic devices are responsible for the increase in convergence insufficiency.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Exercise/psychology , Habits , Ocular Motility Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Social Isolation/psychology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 17(20):7406, 2020.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-845266

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this work is to evaluate the effects of confinement due to COVID-19 isolation on visual function, considering insufficient convergence as one of the possible effects of living the whole day in a reduced space. We pass a Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey (CISS) among 235 people to detect their habits before and after 25 confinement days. The data collection protocol consisted on a Google forms questionnaire included two parts: the first with current data (isolation period) and a second with pre-isolation period data. Differences between the pre-isolation and isolation period were calculated using the related paired T-tests. When statistically significant differences were found, the effect size was estimated using the Cohen’s d index (d). The reduction in physical activity levels during confinement were related to the increase in total number of minutes of screen consumption from 433.49 min to 623.97 min per day (d = 0.67;44.01%). The CISS scores were increased by more than 43% during confinement. The increase in convergence insufficiency was 100% after the studied isolation period of 25 days. The 92.19% increase in television use during 25 days of confinement is not responsible for the increase in convergence insufficiency. However, due to the increase in the use of PCs in this period, there is a notable increase in convergence insufficiency. Therefore, we can conclude that not all increases in tasks with electronic devices are responsible for the increase in convergence insufficiency.

7.
Acta Colombiana de Cuidado Intensivo ; 2020.
Article | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-791507

ABSTRACT

Resumen La coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) ha generado la mayor crisis de salud pública de la era moderna. Se considera que el estado protrombótico inducido por la infección tiene una relación directa y de importancia sustancial con el daño agudo en el pulmón y con las complicaciones de la infección, incluida la muerte. Esta revisión de alcance (scoping review) resume y evalúa críticamente la evidencia sobre la relación entre la trombosis y el COVID-19, y se basa en una búsqueda bibliográfica sistemática de todos los artículos publicados hasta el 5 de mayo de 2020 e incluidos en las bases de datos PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane y Clinicaltrials.gov. Hemos incluido 26 artículos en la revisión, y hemos evaluado su calidad empleando la guía STROBE. Los principales síntomas que presentan los pacientes diagnosticados de COVID-19 son disnea, fiebre, tos, diarrea y vómitos. A nivel analítico destaca, en esta enfermedad, un aumento de Dímero-D, fibrinógeno, tiempo de protrombina y linfopenia. En cuanto a las pruebas radiológicas, las técnicas más usadas para el diagnóstico de tromboembolismo pulmonar, trombosis venosa profunda y otros fenómenos trombóticos;fueron la ecografía y la tomografía computarizada. Como conclusión, en la actualidad existe escasa evidencia científica con respecto a la COVID-19 y sus complicaciones trombóticas. Esta revisión resume este cuerpo de evidencia, evalúa su calidad, y ofrece conclusiones que orientan los siguientes pasos a dar en este área de investigación de enorme relevancia y crecimiento exponencial. Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) has triggered the worst public health crisis of modern times. The prothrombotic state induced by the infection is considered directly and substantially related to acute lung damage and other medical complications, including death. This scoping review summarises and critically assesses the existing evidence on the association between thrombosis and COVID-19, and is based on a systematic literature search of all articles published up to 5 May 2020 included in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane, and Clinicaltrials.gov. A total of 25 articles were included, and their quality evaluated using STROBE guidelines. The main symptoms presented by patients that had been diagnosed with COVID-19 are dyspnoea, fever, cough, diarrhoea, and vomiting. In the laboratory findings, it is characteristic to observe an increase in D-Dimer, fibrinogen, prothrombin time, and lymphopenia. Ultrasound and computed axial tomography were the radiological techniques most used for diagnosing pulmonary thromboembolism, deep vein thrombosis, and other thrombotic phenomena. In conclusion, there is still limited scientific evidence on COVID-19 and its thrombotic complications. This review summarises the body of evidence, assesses its quality, and offers conclusions that should help in the next steps in this highly relevant and expanding research area.

8.
Acta Neurol Scand ; 142(6): 545-554, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-717275

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Collateral damage may occur in epilepsy management during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. We aimed to establish the impact of this pandemic on epilepsy patients in terms of patient-reported seizure control and emerging symptoms. MATERIALS & METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study including consecutive patients assessed by telephone contact in an epilepsy clinic during the first month of confinement. Demographic and clinical characteristics were recorded, and a 19-item questionnaire was systematically completed. Data regarding the impact of confinement, economic effects of the pandemic, and subjective perception of telemedicine were recorded. Additional clinical data were obtained in patients with a COVID-19 diagnosis. RESULTS: Two hundred and fifty-five patients were recruited: mean age 48.2 ± 19.8 years, 121 (47.5%) women. An increase in seizure frequency was reported by 25 (9.8%) patients. Sixty-eight (26.7%) patients reported confinement-related anxiety, 22 (8.6%) depression, 31 (12.2%) both, and 72 (28.2%) insomnia. Seventy-three (28.6%) patients reported a reduction in economic income. Logistic regression analysis showed that tumor-related epilepsy etiology [OR = 7.36 (95% CI 2.17-24.96)], drug-resistant epilepsy [OR = 3.44 (95% CI 1.19-9.95)], insomnia [OR = 3.25 (95% CI 1.18-8.96)], fear of epilepsy [OR = 3.26 (95% CI 1.09-9.74)], and income reduction [OR = 3.65 (95% CI 1.21-10.95)] were associated with a higher risk of increased seizure frequency. Telemedicine was considered satisfactory by 214 (83.9%) patients. Five patients were diagnosed with COVID-19, with no changes in seizure frequency. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has effects in epilepsy patients. Patients with tumor-related, drug-resistant epilepsy, insomnia, and economic difficulties are at a higher risk of increased seizure frequency. Telemedicine represents a suitable tool in this setting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Symptom Flare Up , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Epilepsy/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
10.
J Clin Med ; 9(6)2020 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-593078

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the confirmation of the first patient infected with SARS-CoV-2 in Spain in January 2020, the epidemic has grown rapidly, with the greatest impact on the region of Madrid. This article describes the first 2226 adult patients with COVID-19, consecutively admitted to La Paz University Hospital in Madrid. METHODS: Our cohort included all patients consecutively hospitalized who had a final outcome (death or discharge) in a 1286-bed hospital of Madrid (Spain) from 25 February (first case admitted) to 19 April 2020. The data were manually entered into an electronic case report form, which was monitored prior to the analysis. RESULTS: We consecutively included 2226 adult patients admitted to the hospital who either died (460) or were discharged (1766). The patients' median age was 61 years, and 51.8% were women. The most common comorbidity was arterial hypertension (41.3%), and the most common symptom on admission was fever (71.2%). The median time from disease onset to hospital admission was 6 days. The overall mortality was 20.7% and was higher in men (26.6% vs. 15.1%). Seventy-five patients with a final outcome were transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) (3.4%). Most patients admitted to the ICU were men, and the median age was 64 years. Baseline laboratory values on admission were consistent with an impaired immune-inflammatory profile. CONCLUSIONS: We provide a description of the first large cohort of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in Europe. Advanced age, male sex, the presence of comorbidities and abnormal laboratory values were more common among the patients with fatal outcomes.

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