Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
J Family Med Prim Care ; 11(4): 1244-1249, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776478

ABSTRACT

Background: There is sharp rise in cases of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-associated mucormycosis worldwide and specially during second wave of COVID-19 pandemic. This systemic review was conducted to characterize pulmonary mucormycosis associated with COVID-19 infection. Materials and Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in the electronic database of PubMed and Google Scholar from 1st January 2020 to June 5, 2021 using keywords. Details of all the cases that reported pulmonary mucormycosis in people with COVID-19 so far, were retrieved and analyzed. Result: Total 9 articles of pulmonary mucormycosis with COVID-19 infection were reported in the database of PubMed and Google Scholar. Only one case till date was reported from India, others are from USA (n-3), Italy (n-2), France (n-1), UK (n-1), and Arizona (n-1). Pooled data from this study showed mucormycosis was predominantly seen in males (8 male, 1 female). The most common comorbidities associated were diabetes (n-3), hematological malignancy, (n-2) and end-stage renal disease (n-2), while 2 cases did not show any associated comorbidity. All the cases were having severe COVID-19 infection and 7 out of 9 patients were in ICU and on mechanical ventilation at the time of diagnosis. None of the cases associated with rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis (ROCM) except 1 patient with sinus involvement. Mortality was found in 7 out of 9 patients. Conclusion: There is a need to keep a high index of suspicion in patients with severe COVID-19 infections, diabetic, and received treatment in ICU with ventilator support for early diagnosis and treatment. Although Mucor is less common than Aspergillus infection, it is associated with higher mortality.

2.
Indian J Crit Care Med ; 25(12): 1395-1401, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559934

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY: The objectives of the study were to assess the mortality among critically ill coronavirus disease (COVID) patients and to look at the factors which could have a bearing on mortality of these patients presenting to our designated tertiary COVID care institute. METHOD: This was a retrospective observational study involving all adult patients admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU) with coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) infection between June 30, 2020, and August 31, 2020. We compared patient-related factors and laboratory test results among all survivors vs nonsurvivors in our ICU with an aim to predict the factors which could predict increased risks of mortality among sick patients admitted to our ICU. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The overall ICU mortality in our ICU during the study period was 76.69% and less than 5% of the patients requiring mechanical ventilation within 1 day of admission, survived. More than half of the deaths (54.66%) occurred within 5 days of ICU admission. The best predictors for mortality based upon the Cox proportional hazard ratio are increasing age, neutrophilia, increased D-dimer, prolonged stay in ICU for 1-2 weeks, and those requiring mechanical ventilation. Patients with one or more comorbidities were noted to have 16% of higher risk of death than those without any comorbidity. HOW TO CITE THIS ARTICLE: Rai DK, Sahay N, Lohani P. Clinical Characteristics and Treatment Outcomes of 293 COVID-19 Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of a Tertiary Care Hospital of Eastern India. Indian J Crit Care Med 2021;25(12):1395-1401.

3.
Cureus ; 13(8): e17170, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372146

ABSTRACT

Introduction Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causing COVID-19 disease is the third coronavirus to have emerged in the last 20 years. The COVID-19 infection causes more severe illness in patients with comorbid diseases, especially in patients with diabetes, hypertension and kidney failure. Methods This is a retrospective study using electronic records and laboratory data of adult patients hospitalised at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), Patna between May 1st, 2020 and March 31st, 2021, who were diagnosed with COVID-19 and needed haemodialysis. The demographic characteristics, co-morbidities, symptoms, clinical course, laboratory parameters, and treatments were recorded. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical profile and outcome of patients on hemodialysis with COVID-19 infection. Results The study included 261 COVID-19 patients who needed haemodialysis. The most common symptoms on admission were fever (72.8%), cough (64.3%) and dyspnoea (46.6%). The mean age was 58.4 +/-15 years. A total of 195 patients (74.7%) were male. The most common co-morbid condition was hypertension (85.1%) followed by diabetes (71.9%). A total of 118 (45.2) patients had acute on chronic kidney disease (CKD), 40 (15.3) were on maintenance haemodialysis (MHD) and 103 (39.5) were having acute kidney injury (AKI). Eight patients were renal transplant recipients. At presentation, 183 (70.1%) patients were having mild to moderately severe infection and 78 (29.9%) patients were having severe disease. A total of 213 patients required ICU admissions, 186 (75.3%) of whom required invasive ventilation. Overall mortality was 66% (172/261) and the rest were discharged. Conclusion The study suggests that COVID-19 disease has a significantly more severe course and poorer outcome in patients requiring haemodialysis.

4.
J Family Med Prim Care ; 10(5): 2028-2031, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291514

ABSTRACT

The most common lung problem faced by a post-COVID patient is lung fibrosis. Clinical recovery is generally complete in mild-to-moderately severe COVID-19 cases but a small proportion of patients with severe disease may go on to develop lung fibrosis. Patient groups at the highest risk to develop lung fibrosis are the elderly, especially those requiring ICU stay and mechanical ventilation. No definitive therapy for managing this pulmonary fibrosis exists as of date, even though various options are being explored. This case series highlights three cases of post-COVID lung fibrosis and reviews the existing literature.

5.
J Family Med Prim Care ; 10(5): 1852-1855, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280843

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Given the limited availability of critical care resources in our country, it is important to identify reliable predictors of hypoxia in patients with COVID-19 infection. We thus sought to compare differential predictive values of demographic, clinical, and laboratory measures and identify predictor for hypoxia in COVID-19 infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is single-center retrospective analysis of patient admitted at AIIMS Patna between 15th June and 15th Aug. All the patients who had oxygen saturation less than 94% grouped under hypoxic group while ≥94% in non-hypoxic group at room air. Statistical analysis: Logistic regression model used to determine the predictor of hypoxia in COVID-19 infection. RESULTS: Total 73 were used for analysis. Study patients had a mean age of 55.05 ± 12.7 year, of whom 78.08% were male (57/73). 39 (53.42%) patients were found hypoxic at time of admission while 34 (46.56%) were non-hypoxic. Presence of dyspnoea significantly found more frequently in hypoxic patients (P = 0.0003). Patients with O2 saturation of less than 94% have more likely to have diabetes (P = 0.002) and hypertension (P = 0.02). Analysis of laboratory variables showed that leucocytosis (P = 0.007) and neutrophilia (P = 0.01) were significantly higher in hypoxic group compare to non-hypoxic group. Univariate regression model showed patient with any one comorbidities, diabetes, or hypertension was found as strong risk factor for hypoxia after COVID-19 infection (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: This is the first study to identify predictor of hypoxia in COVID-19 infection. Patient with any one comorbidities, diabetes, or hypertension was found strong risk factor for hypoxia after COVID-19 infection. Among lab variable, leucocytosis, neutrophilia, lymphocytopenia, and CRP (>27.5 mg/L) were found as predictor of hypoxia in COVID infection.

6.
J Family Med Prim Care ; 9(10): 5384-5385, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013459
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL