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1.
Public Health Nurs ; 38(5): 892-896, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223541

ABSTRACT

In many correctional facilities across the United States, COVID-19 vaccine refusal rates are as high as 50%. Most women leaving jails have low SES, health literacy, and mistrust of governmental institutions, thus exacerbating existing health disparities and making women leaving jail vulnerable. Data from 25 interviews with recently released women suggest that interventions to promote vaccines to this population will have to address health education and mitigate mistrust, misinformation, and conspiracy theories.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , Prisoners , Vaccination , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Humans , Jails , Prisoners/psychology , Prisoners/statistics & numerical data , Qualitative Research , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination/psychology
2.
Am J Public Health ; 111(6): 1035-1039, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216999

ABSTRACT

We report on data we collected from a 2018 survey examining jails' human papillomavirus virus vaccine delivery capacity and on a secondary analysis we conducted to describe factors similarly associated with delivery planning for the COVID-19 vaccine. We provide recommendations for delivering the COVID-19 vaccine in jails, based on evidence from Kansas, Iowa, Nebraska, and Missouri. Our key finding is that jails have limited staff to implement vaccination and will require collaboration between jail administrators, jail medical staff, and local health departments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Health Personnel , Immunization Programs , Jails , Public Health , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Iowa , Kansas , Male , Missouri , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage
3.
New Media & Society ; : 1461444820966993, 2020.
Article in English | Sage | ID: covidwho-883525

ABSTRACT

Based on interviews with 75 women transitioning from incarceration, our research identifies technology access and skills barriers facing this population and their underlying concerns and motivations in navigating privacy online. Our results suggest precarious housing and financial situations, concerns about ex-partners, mental health issues, and lack of self-efficacy pose challenges for their access to and use of digital technologies and influence their online privacy perspectives. Many participants reported relying primarily on cellphones for various tasks including job applications. Closing public places including libraries amid the COVID-19 pandemic put them at an even greater disadvantage, as many of them depend on computers or Wi-Fi available in those places. Nothing-to-lose attitudes were salient among this group resulting in many not taking precautionary measures online or choosing to go offline. Our research highlights the importance of building academic-community partnerships to provide technology and privacy education tailored for this population?s particular needs and desires.

4.
Health Educ Behav ; 47(4): 544-548, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-209959

ABSTRACT

In March-April, 2020, we communicated with a cohort of criminal justice-involved (CJI) women to see how they were navigating COVID-19, chronic illness, homelessness, and shelter-in-place orders in Oakland, Birmingham, and Kansas City. We report on conversations with N = 35 women (out of the cohort of 474 women) and our own observations from ongoing criminal justice involvement studies. Women reported barriers to protecting themselves given widespread unstable housing and complex health needs, though many tried to follow COVID-19 prevention recommendations. Women expressed dissatisfaction with the suspension of research activities, as the pandemic contributed to a heightened need for study incentives, such as cash, emotional support, and other resources. COVID-19 is illuminating disparities between those who can follow recommended actions to prevent infection and those who lack resources to do so. Concerted efforts are required to reduce inequities that put the 1.3 million U.S. women under criminal justice supervision at risk for infection and mortality.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prisoners/psychology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Chronic Disease , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Female , Homeless Persons , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
5.
Public Health Nurs ; 37(3): 325-326, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-47298
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