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1.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 65: 104028, 2022 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1914837

ABSTRACT

Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) are often of childbearing age. Thirty-six women with MS who were pregnant (n = 27) or within 6 weeks postpartum (n = 9) were reported in the North American COViMS registry and their COVID-19 outcomes were described. One pregnant and one postpartum woman were hospitalized. No deaths occurred. To compare COVID-19 clinical outcomes in pregnant and postpartum females with females who were not pregnant or postpartum, a 1:2 propensity score match was performed. While not powered to detect small differences, it was reassuring that no increased risks for those with MS who were pregnant/postpartum were revealed.

2.
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm ; 8(5)2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1371991

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To describe the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on people with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody disease (MOGAD). METHODS: The COVID-19 Infections in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Related Diseases (COViMS) Registry collected data on North American patients with MS and related diseases with laboratory-positive or highly suspected SARS-CoV-2 infection. Deidentified data were entered into a web-based registry by health care providers. Data were analyzed using t-tests, Pearson χ2 tests, or Fisher exact tests for categorical variables. Univariate logistic regression models examined effects of risk factors and COVID-19 clinical severity. RESULTS: As of June 7, 2021, 77 patients with NMOSD and 20 patients with MOGAD were reported in the COViMS Registry. Most patients with NMOSD were laboratory positive for SARS-CoV-2 and taking rituximab at the time of COVID-19 diagnosis. Most patients with NMOSD were not hospitalized (64.9% [95% CI: 53.2%-75.5%]), whereas 15.6% (95% CI: 8.3%-25.6%) were hospitalized only, 9.1% (95% CI: 3.7%-17.8%) were admitted to the ICU and/or ventilated, and 10.4% (95% CI: 4.6%-19.5%) died. In patients with NMOSD, having a comorbidity was the sole factor identified for poorer COVID-19 outcome (OR = 6.0, 95% CI: 1.79-19.98). Most patients with MOGAD were laboratory positive for SARS-CoV-2, and almost half were taking rituximab. Among patients with MOGAD, 75.0% were not hospitalized, and no deaths were recorded; no factors were different between those not hospitalized and those hospitalized, admitted to the ICU, or ventilated. DISCUSSION: Among the reported patients with NMOSD, a high mortality rate was observed, and the presence of comorbid conditions was associated with worse COVID-19 outcome. There were no deaths reported in the patients with MOGAD, although these observations are limited due to small sample size.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/mortality , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein/immunology , Neuromyelitis Optica/mortality , Registries , Adult , Aged , Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , Comorbidity , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Neuromyelitis Optica/drug therapy , North America/epidemiology , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Respiration, Artificial , Rituximab/administration & dosage
3.
Neurol Ther ; 10(2): 415-425, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1340490

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 vaccines are safe for people living with MS on or off disease-modifying therapies and are important for the prevention of COVID-19. Antibody responses for individuals on certain DMTs may be diminished, however, T-cell responses may be preserved in those individuals. Data are lacking regarding optimal timing of vaccinations, and delaying disease-modifying therapies may increase the risk of disease activity and progression. In this perspective podcast, the authors recommend COVID-19 vaccination as soon as possible, regardless of timing considerations, in most cases.

4.
JAMA Neurol ; 78(6): 699-708, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1141278

ABSTRACT

Importance: Emergence of SARS-CoV-2 causing COVID-19 prompted the need to gather information on clinical outcomes and risk factors associated with morbidity and mortality in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and concomitant SARS-CoV-2 infections. Objective: To examine outcomes and risk factors associated with COVID-19 clinical severity in a large, diverse cohort of North American patients with MS. Design, Setting, and Participants: This analysis used deidentified, cross-sectional data on patients with MS and SARS-CoV-2 infection reported by health care professionals in North American academic and community practices between April 1, 2020, and December 12, 2020, in the COVID-19 Infections in MS Registry. Health care professionals were asked to report patients after a minimum of 7 days from initial symptom onset and after sufficient time had passed to observe the COVID-19 disease course through resolution of acute illness or death. Data collection began April 1, 2020, and is ongoing. Exposures: Laboratory-positive SARS-CoV-2 infection or highly suspected COVID-19. Main Outcomes and Measures: Clinical outcome with 4 levels of increasing severity: not hospitalized, hospitalization only, admission to the intensive care unit and/or required ventilator support, and death. Results: Of 1626 patients, most had laboratory-positive SARS-CoV-2 infection (1345 [82.7%]), were female (1202 [74.0%]), and had relapsing-remitting MS (1255 [80.4%]). A total of 996 patients (61.5%) were non-Hispanic White, 337 (20.8%) were Black, and 190 (11.7%) were Hispanic/Latinx. The mean (SD) age was 47.7 (13.2) years, and 797 (49.5%) had 1 or more comorbidity. The overall mortality rate was 3.3% (95% CI, 2.5%-4.3%). Ambulatory disability and older age were each independently associated with increased odds of all clinical severity levels compared with those not hospitalized after adjusting for other risk factors (nonambulatory: hospitalization only, odds ratio [OR], 2.8 [95% CI, 1.6-4.8]; intensive care unit/required ventilator support, OR, 3.5 [95% CI, 1.6-7.8]; death, OR, 25.4 [95% CI, 9.3-69.1]; age [every 10 years]: hospitalization only, OR, 1.3 [95% CI, 1.1-1.6]; intensive care unit/required ventilator support, OR, 1.3 [95% CI, 0.99-1.7]; death, OR, 1.8 [95% CI, 1.2-2.6]). Conclusions and Relevance: In this registry-based cross-sectional study, increased disability was independently associated with worse clinical severity including death from COVID-19. Other risk factors for worse outcomes included older age, Black race, cardiovascular comorbidities, and recent treatment with corticosteroids. Knowledge of these risk factors may improve the treatment of patients with MS and COVID-19 by helping clinicians identify patients requiring more intense monitoring or COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Multiple Sclerosis/mortality , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Registries , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Treatment Outcome , United States/epidemiology
5.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 49: 102777, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1036334

ABSTRACT

We report the case of a MS patient on subcutaneous ofatumumab who became infected with SARS-CoV-2 and remained asymptomatic while developing antiviral IgM and IgG antibodies. The patient was B-cell depleted with normal serum immunoglobulin levels. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies remained positive three months after the initial infection. These findings suggest that a MS patient treated with ofatumumab may be able to mount an effective humoral response to SARS-CoV-2 infection and probably to COVID-19 vaccines as well. Further research will be necessary to evaluate the humoral response of MS patients on ofatumumab to SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 vaccines.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Multiple Sclerosis , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Multiple Sclerosis/drug therapy , Multiple Sclerosis/immunology , Multiple Sclerosis/virology , SARS-CoV-2
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