Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
J Bioeth Inq ; 2022 May 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820983

ABSTRACT

Meat is a multi-billion-dollar industry that relies on people performing risky physical work inside meat-processing facilities over long shifts in close proximity. These workers are socially disempowered, and many are members of groups beset by historic and ongoing structural discrimination. The combination of working conditions and worker characteristics facilitate the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Workers have been expected to put their health and lives at risk during the pandemic because of government and industry pressures to keep this "essential industry" producing. Numerous interventions can significantly reduce the risks to workers and their communities; however, the industry's implementation has been sporadic and inconsistent. With a focus on the U.S. context, this paper offers an ethical framework for infection prevention and control recommendations grounded in public health values of health and safety, interdependence and solidarity, and health equity and justice, with particular attention to considerations of reciprocity, equitable burden sharing, harm reduction, and health promotion. Meat-processing workers are owed an approach that protects their health relative to the risks of harms to them, their families, and their communities. Sacrifices from businesses benefitting financially from essential industry status are ethically warranted and should acknowledge the risks assumed by workers in the context of existing structural inequities.

2.
J Gen Intern Med ; 2022 Apr 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1782935

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While hate crimes rose during the COVID-19 pandemic, few studies examined whether this pandemic-time racial discrimination has led to negative health consequences at the population level. OBJECTIVE: We examined whether experienced and perceived racial discrimination were associated with mental or behavioral health outcomes during the pandemic. DESIGN: In October 2020, we conducted a national survey with minorities oversampled that covered respondents' sociodemographic background and health-related information. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 2709 participants responded to the survey (response rate: 4.2%). MAIN MEASURES: The exposure variables included (1) experienced and encountered racial discrimination, (2) experienced racial and ethnic cyberbullying, and (3) perceived racial bias. Mental health outcomes were measured by psychological distress and self-rated happiness. Measures for behavioral health included sleep quality, change in cigarette smoking, and change in alcohol consumption. Weighted logistic regressions were performed to estimate the associations between the exposure variables and the outcomes, controlling for age, gender, race and ethnicity, educational attainment, household income, eligibility to vote, political party, COVID-19 infection, and geographic region. Separate regressions were performed in the six racial and ethnic subgroups: non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black, Hispanic, East Asian, South Asian, and Southeast Asian respondents. KEY RESULTS: Experienced racial discrimination was associated with higher likelihood of psychological distress (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.18, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 1.34-3.55). Experienced racial discrimination (AOR = 2.31, 95% CI: 1.34-3.99) and perceived racial bias (AOR = 1.05, 95% CI: 1.00-1.09) were both associated with increased cigarette smoking. The associations between racial discrimination and mental distress and substance use were most salient among Black, East Asian, South Asian, and Hispanic respondents. CONCLUSIONS: Racial discrimination may be associated with higher likelihood of distress, and cigarette smoking among racial and ethnic minorities. Addressing racial discrimination is important for mitigating negative mental and behavioral health ramifications of the pandemic.

3.
Journal of Environmental Health ; 84(1):16-25, 2021.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1281159

ABSTRACT

The meatpacking industry has faced significant challenges in maintaining a safe and healthy working environment for its employees during the COVID-19 pandemic, which has resulted in worker illness and death, temporary closures of facilities, reductions in production capacity, and consequences throughout the supply chain. We sought to explore the concerns and perceptions of COVID-19 among meatpacking workers in the Midwestern part of the U.S. We conducted an online survey of meatpacking workers in Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, and Missouri between May 7 and 25, 2020. A total of 585 workers participated (M = 41.3 years, SD = 10.3). More than 72% of workers believed that they were at "high risk" for contracting COVID-19, but less than one half had been tested (42%). Most workers (83%) reported that their employer had instituted some safety measures, but less than one half reported physical distancing on the line (39%), slowing down the line (34%), additional paid time off (28%), or restructuring of shifts (20%). Enforceable standards are needed in the meatpacking industry to reduce COVID-19 transmission. Culturally and linguistically tailored education, paid sick leave, and restructuring of work can reduce the risks of COVID-19 transmission. Transparency on workplace transmission rates is essential to developing strategies to mitigate occupational risks and foster worker trust.

4.
J Agromedicine ; 25(4): 378-382, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174763

ABSTRACT

From the farms to the packing plants, essential workers in critical food production industries keep food on our tables while risking their and their families' health and well-being to bring home a paycheck. They work in essential industries but are often invisible. The disparities illuminated by COVID-19 are not new. Instead, they are the result of years of inequities built into practices, policies, and systems that reinforce societal power structures. As a society, we are now at an antagonizing moment where we can change our collective trajectory to focus forward and promote equity and justice for workers in agriculture and food-related industries. To that end, we describe our experience and approach in addressing COVID-19 outbreaks in meat processing facilities, which included three pillars of action based on public health ethics and international human rights: (1) worksite prevention and control, (2) community-based prevention and control, and (3) treatment. Our approach can be translated to promote the health, safety, and well-being of the broader agricultural workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Farmers/psychology , Meat-Packing Industry/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , Farmers/statistics & numerical data , Food Supply , Human Rights , Humans , Public Health/statistics & numerical data
5.
J Agromedicine ; 25(4): 353-356, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174757

ABSTRACT

Face-to-face outreach and in-person training have traditionally been key strategies in reaching agricultural producers, workers, and communities with safety and health information, but the COVID-19 pandemic has forced outreach educators to be creative and find alternative ways to reach, communicate, and share such information. In this commentary, we describe our use of social media to reach Latino/a cattle feedyard workers with COVID-19 related information. As a result of our effort, we reached over 54,000 people and demonstrated there is an audience for Spanish-language agricultural safety and health information. Social media can be a cost-effective method for virtual outreach in this new normal. We should look at this time as an opportunity to learn more about how our stakeholders obtain information and about how best we can connect with them. Although our outreach methods may be changing, our goal is not - we will continue to work to improve the safety and health of those who work in agriculture.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Social Media , User-Computer Interface , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communication , Farmers/psychology , Farmers/statistics & numerical data , Health Education/methods , Humans , Language , Occupational Health , Pandemics
6.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 27(4): 1032-1038, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085129

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has severely impacted the meat processing industry in the United States. We sought to detail demographics and outcomes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infections among workers in Nebraska meat processing facilities and determine the effects of initiating universal mask policies and installing physical barriers at 13 meat processing facilities. During April 1-July 31, 2020, COVID-19 was diagnosed in 5,002 Nebraska meat processing workers (attack rate 19%). After initiating both universal masking and physical barrier interventions, 8/13 facilities showed a statistically significant reduction in COVID-19 incidence in <10 days. Characteristics and incidence of confirmed cases aligned with many nationwide trends becoming apparent during this pandemic: specifically, high attack rates among meat processing industry workers, disproportionately high risk of adverse outcomes among ethnic and racial minority groups and men, and effectiveness of using multiple prevention and control interventions to reduce disease transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Food-Processing Industry , Infection Control , Meat-Packing Industry , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Food-Processing Industry/methods , Food-Processing Industry/organization & administration , Food-Processing Industry/trends , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Male , Meat-Packing Industry/methods , Meat-Packing Industry/organization & administration , Meat-Packing Industry/trends , Minority Health/statistics & numerical data , Nebraska/epidemiology , Occupational Health/standards , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Workplace/standards
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL