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1.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1029385, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236976

ABSTRACT

Rapid urbanization has gradually strengthened the spatial links between cities, which greatly aggravates the possibility of the spread of an epidemic. Traditional methods lack the early and accurate detection of epidemics. This study took the Hubei province as the study area and used Tencent's location big data to study the spread of COVID-19. Using ArcGIS as a platform, the urban relation intensity, urban centrality, overlay analysis, and correlation analysis were used to measure and analyze the population mobility data of 17 cities in Hubei province. The results showed that there was high similarity in the spatial distribution of urban relation intensity, urban centrality, and the number of infected people, all indicating the spatial distribution characteristics of "one large and two small" distributions with Wuhan as the core and Huanggang and Xiaogan as the two wings. The urban centrality of Wuhan was four times higher than that of Huanggang and Xiaogan, and the urban relation intensity of Wuhan with Huanggang and Xiaogan was also the second highest in the Hubei province. Meanwhile, in the analysis of the number of infected persons, it was found that the number of infected persons in Wuhan was approximately two times that of these two cities. Through correlation analysis of the urban relation intensity, urban centrality, and the number of infected people, it was found that there was an extremely significant positive correlation among the urban relation intensity, urban centrality, and the number of infected people, with an R2 of 0.976 and 0.938, respectively. Based on Tencent's location big data, this study conducted the epidemic spread research for "epidemic spatial risk classification and prevention and control level selection" to make up for the shortcomings in epidemic risk analysis and judgment. This could provide a reference for city managers to effectively coordinate existing resources, formulate policy, and control the epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , Animals , Humans , Big Data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Cities
2.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1125301, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2296674

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the limitations of urban public health emergency response capabilities. Taking Wuhan as an example, this study used breakpoint regression, kernel density analysis, overlay analysis, and accessibility analysis from Stata and ArcGIS, and divided epidemic prevention facilities into the basic epidemic prevention facilities (hospitals), and the emergency epidemic prevention facilities (mobile cabin hospitals) for further analysis. The results showed that over 70% of the basic epidemic prevention facilities in Wuhan were located in high density population areas. On the contrary, most of the emergency epidemic prevention facilities were located in low density population areas. The local treatment effect of the implementation of the emergency epidemic prevention facility policy is about 1, indicating that there was a significant impact of emergency epidemic prevention facilities on outbreak control, which passed the bandwidth test. What's more, the analysis of the accessibility of residential points revealed that more than 67.3% of people from the residential points could arrive at the epidemic prevention facilities within 15 min, and only 0.1% of them took more than 20 min to arrive. Therefore, the epidemic prevention facilities can effectively curb the spread of the epidemic, and people from residential areas can quickly get there. This study summarized the spatial characteristics of epidemic prevention facilities in Wuhan and analyzed the importance of them, thus providing a new perspective for future research on upgrading the city's comprehensive disaster prevention system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cities , Pandemics , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Hospitals
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