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1.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-324237

ABSTRACT

Background: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is threatening the world with the symptoms of seasonal influenza. This study was conducted to investigate the patient characteristics and clinical value of blood markers to assess the severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Methods: : 187 patients, diagnosed with COVID-19 (non-severe and severe cases) and admitted to hospital between January 27th and March 8th of 2020, were enrolled in the present study. Results: : A higher proportion of clinical symptoms, including cough, expectoration, myalgia and fatigue were observed in non-severe group. Significant increased level of WBC count, neutrophils, CRP, IL-6 and IL-8 were noted in severe group. The level of neutrophils, CRP, IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly increased, while platelet was remarkely decreased in the severe group. The risk model based on lymphocyte, IL-6, IL-8, CRP and platelet had the highest area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUROC). The baseline of IL-6, IL-8 and CRP was positively correlated with other parameters except lymphocyte, hemoglobin and platelet. While the baseline of platelet was negatively correlated with other parameters except lymphocyte and hemoglobin. Additionally, there was no connection between severity of COVID-19 and cultures of blood, sputum and catheter secretion. Conclusions: : The present study suggested that IL-6, IL-8, CRP and platelet played a critical role in deterioration of COVID-19 with potential value for monitoring the severity of COVID-19.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-313435

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused global pandemic, resulting in considerable mortality. The risk factors, clinical treatments and especially comprehensive risk models for COVID-19 death are urgently warranted. Methods In this retrospective study, 281 non-survivors and 712 survivors with propensity score matching by age, sex and comorbidities were enrolled from January 13, 2020 to March 31, 2020. Results Higher SOFA, qSOFA, APACHE II and SIRS scores, hypoxia, elevated inflammatory cytokines, multi-organ dysfunction, decreased immune cells subsets and complications were significantly associated with the higher COVID-19 death risk. In addition to traditional predictors for death risk, including APACHE II (AUC = 0.83), SIRS (AUC = 0.75), SOFA (AUC = 0.70) and qSOFA scores (AUC = 0.61), another four prediction models that included immune cells subsets (AUC = 0.90), multiple organ damage biomarkers (AUC = 0.89), complications (AUC = 0.88) and inflammatory-related indexes (AUC = 0.75) were established. Additionally, the predictive accuracy of combining these risk factors (AUC = 0.950) was also significantly higher than that of each risk group alone, outperforming previous risk models, which was significant for early clinical management for COVID-19. Conclusions The potential risk factors could help to predict the clinical prognosis of COVID-19 patients at an early stage. The combined model might be more suitable for the death risk evaluation of COVID-19.

3.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 951, 2021 Sep 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1412707

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused a global pandemic, resulting in considerable mortality. The risk factors, clinical treatments, especially comprehensive risk models for COVID-19 death are urgently warranted. METHODS: In this retrospective study, 281 non-survivors and 712 survivors with propensity score matching by age, sex, and comorbidities were enrolled from January 13, 2020 to March 31, 2020. RESULTS: Higher SOFA, qSOFA, APACHE II and SIRS scores, hypoxia, elevated inflammatory cytokines, multi-organ dysfunction, decreased immune cell subsets, and complications were significantly associated with the higher COVID-19 death risk. In addition to traditional predictors for death risk, including APACHE II (AUC = 0.83), SIRS (AUC = 0.75), SOFA (AUC = 0.70) and qSOFA scores (AUC = 0.61), another four prediction models that included immune cells subsets (AUC = 0.90), multiple organ damage biomarkers (AUC = 0.89), complications (AUC = 0.88) and inflammatory-related indexes (AUC = 0.75) were established. Additionally, the predictive accuracy of combining these risk factors (AUC = 0.950) was also significantly higher than that of each risk group alone, which was significant for early clinical management for COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: The potential risk factors could help to predict the clinical prognosis of COVID-19 patients at an early stage. The combined model might be more suitable for the death risk evaluation of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sepsis , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
4.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 951, 2021 Sep 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406708

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused a global pandemic, resulting in considerable mortality. The risk factors, clinical treatments, especially comprehensive risk models for COVID-19 death are urgently warranted. METHODS: In this retrospective study, 281 non-survivors and 712 survivors with propensity score matching by age, sex, and comorbidities were enrolled from January 13, 2020 to March 31, 2020. RESULTS: Higher SOFA, qSOFA, APACHE II and SIRS scores, hypoxia, elevated inflammatory cytokines, multi-organ dysfunction, decreased immune cell subsets, and complications were significantly associated with the higher COVID-19 death risk. In addition to traditional predictors for death risk, including APACHE II (AUC = 0.83), SIRS (AUC = 0.75), SOFA (AUC = 0.70) and qSOFA scores (AUC = 0.61), another four prediction models that included immune cells subsets (AUC = 0.90), multiple organ damage biomarkers (AUC = 0.89), complications (AUC = 0.88) and inflammatory-related indexes (AUC = 0.75) were established. Additionally, the predictive accuracy of combining these risk factors (AUC = 0.950) was also significantly higher than that of each risk group alone, which was significant for early clinical management for COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: The potential risk factors could help to predict the clinical prognosis of COVID-19 patients at an early stage. The combined model might be more suitable for the death risk evaluation of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sepsis , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
5.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 921, 2021 Sep 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398844

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is threatening the world with the symptoms of seasonal influenza. This study was conducted to investigate the patient characteristics and clinical value of blood markers to assess the severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: 187 patients, diagnosed with COVID-19 (non-severe and severe cases) and admitted to hospital between January 27th and March 8th of 2020, were enrolled in the present study. RESULTS: A higher proportion of clinical symptoms, including cough, expectoration, myalgia, and fatigue were observed in the non-severe group. The level of white blood cell count, neutrophils, CRP, IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly increased, while the platelet count was remarkedly decreased in the severe group. The risk model based on lymphocyte, IL-6, IL-8, CRP and platelet counts had the highest area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUROC). The baseline of IL-6, IL-8 and CRP was positively correlated with other parameters except in the cases of lymphocyte, hemoglobin and platelet counts. The baseline of the platelet count was negatively correlated with other parameters except in the lymphocyte and hemoglobin counts. Additionally, there was no connection between the severity of COVID-19 and cultures of blood, sputum or catheter secretion. CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggested that high leucocyte and low platelets counts were independent predictive markers of the severity of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Area Under Curve , Biomarkers , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Platelet Count , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes ; 14: 47-58, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1028685

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Recently, a cluster of pneumonia caused by SARS-CoV-2 were identified in Wuhan and spread throughout the world. More information about risk factors for mortality of critically ill patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 remain to be evaluated. METHODS: We included adult patients confirmed with SARS-CoV-2 infection who were critically ill and admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of Tongji Hospital in Wuhan from Feb 4, 2020 to Feb 20, 2020. Data were collected and compared between patients who died and improved. Logistic regression was used to explore the risk factors for death of SARS-CoV-2-infected critically ill patients. RESULTS: A total of 160 critically ill patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection were included, of which 146 patients with appeared outcomes were included into the final analysis. The random blood glucose, serum sodium and effective plasma osmolarity were higher in deceased patients, especially in patients with diabetes. There were 7 patients with diabetes with hyperosmolar status and all of them were deceased. Multivariable regression revealed that older age (odds ratio 4.28, 95% CI 1.01-18.20; p = 0.049), higher C-reactive protein (odds ratio 1.01, 1.00-1.03; p = 0.024), higher interleukin-6 (odds ratio 1.01, 1.00-1.03; p = 0.0323), and d-dimer greater than 1 µg/mL (odds ratio 1.10, 1.01-1.20; p = 0.032) at admission were associated with increased odds of death. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, hyperosmolarity needs more attention and may contribute to mortality in critically ill patients with COVID-19, especially in those with diabetes. Older age, inflammatory response, and thrombosis may be risk factors for death of critically ill patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection.

7.
Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 19(3): 597-603, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-932803

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a major global health threat. We aimed to describe the characteristics of liver function in patients with SARS-CoV-2 and chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) coinfection. METHODS: We enrolled all adult patients with SARS-CoV-2 and chronic HBV coinfection admitted to Tongji Hospital from February 1 to February 29, 2020. Data of demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory tests, treatments, and clinical outcomes were collected. The characteristics of liver function and its association with the severity and prognosis of disease were described. RESULTS: Of the 105 patients with SARS-CoV-2 and chronic HBV coinfection, elevated levels of liver test were observed in several patients at admission, including elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase (22, 20.95%), aspartate aminotransferase (29, 27.62%), total bilirubin (7, 6.67%), gamma-glutamyl transferase (7, 6.67%), and alkaline phosphatase (1, 0.95%). The levels of the indicators mentioned above increased substantially during hospitalization (all P < .05). Fourteen (13.33%) patients developed liver injury. Most of them (10, 71.43%) recovered after 8 (range 6-21) days. Notably the other, 4 (28.57%) patients rapidly progressed to acute-on-chronic liver failure. The proportion of severe COVID-19 was higher in patients with liver injury (P = .042). Complications including acute-on-chronic liver failure, acute cardiac injury and shock happened more frequently in patients with liver injury (all P < .05). The mortality was higher in individuals with liver injury (28.57% vs 3.30%, P = .004). CONCLUSION: Liver injury in patients with SARS-CoV-2 and chronic HBV coinfection was associated with severity and poor prognosis of disease. During the treatment of COVID-19 in chronic HBV-infected patients, liver function should be taken seriously and evaluated frequently.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Coinfection/complications , Hepatitis B, Chronic/complications , Liver/physiopathology , Adult , Aged , Alanine Transaminase/blood , Aspartate Aminotransferases/blood , Bilirubin/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , China , Coinfection/blood , Coinfection/mortality , Female , Hepatitis B, Chronic/blood , Hepatitis B, Chronic/mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Liver Function Tests , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Survival Rate
8.
Risk Manag Healthc Policy ; 13: 833-845, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690091

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a worldwide pandemic outbreak with a high mortality. Prognostic factors of critically ill patients with COVID-19 have not been fully elucidated yet. METHODS: In the present study, 59 patients with COVID-19 from the intensive care unit of the Caidian Branch of Tongji Hospital were enrolled. Epidemiological, demographic, clinical, laboratory, radiological, treatment data, and clinical outcomes were collected. Prognostic factors were statistically defined. RESULTS: Of the 59 patients studied (67.4±11.3 years), 38 patients were male, 51 had underlying diseases, and 41 patients died during admission. Compared with the survivors, the deceased patients were of older age, had more smoking history, severer fatigue, and diarrhea, a higher incidence of multiple organ injuries, more deteriorative lymphopenia and thrombocytopenia, remarkably impaired cellular immune response, and strengthened cytokine release. Age higher than 70 (OR=2.76, 95% CI=1.45-5.23), arrhythmia (OR=4.76, 95% CI=1.59-14.25), and a Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score above 4 (OR=5.16, 95% CI=1.29-20.55) were identified as risk factors for mortality of patients. CONCLUSION: Critically ill COVID-19 patients aged higher than 70, arrhythmia, or a SOFA score above 4 have a high risk of mortality, and need prior medical intervention.

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