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1.
Expert Rev Med Devices ; 18(6): 523-531, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221433

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In this review, we will summarize the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on neurointerventional care for patients with cerebrovascular disease, with a particular emphasis on epidemiology, neurointerventional processes, and lessons learned from paradigm shifts in endovascular care.Areas covered: Peer-reviewed research is summarized regarding the complications of COVID-19 as related to the pandemic's impact on hospital admissions, imaging capabilities, treatment times, and outcomes of neurointerventional cases.Expert opinion: In the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a global decline in neuroimaging, use of intravenous thrombolysis, thrombectomy, and coil embolization for ruptured intracranial aneurysms. An early recommendation to utilize general anesthesia and intubate all patients undergoing intervention to avoid an emergent aerosolizing procedure was found to have worse outcomes. The decline in new stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage diagnoses may be related to patient and/or family fear of seeking acute medical care. A true shift in stroke epidemiology is also possible. As several vaccines become more readily available and the world rebounds from this pandemic, we hope to transform the neurointerventional experiences discussed in this paper into strategies that may improve care delivery of neurologically ill patients during a global crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Humans , Pandemics , Stroke/epidemiology , Thrombectomy
2.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(8): 105857, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1213403

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To characterize differences in disposition arrangement among rehab-eligible stroke patients at a Comprehensive Stroke Center before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed a prospective registry for demographics, hospital course, and discharge dispositions of rehab-eligible acute stroke survivors admitted 6 months prior to (10/2019-03/2020) and during (04/2020-09/2020) the COVID-19 pandemic. The primary outcome was discharge to an inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF) as opposed to other facilities using descriptive statistics, and IRF versus home using unadjusted and adjusted backward stepwise logistic regression. RESULTS: Of the 507 rehab-eligible stroke survivors, there was no difference in age, premorbid disability, or stroke severity between study periods (p>0.05). There was a 9% absolute decrease in discharges to an IRF during the pandemic (32.1% vs. 41.1%, p=0.04), which translated to 38% lower odds of being discharged to IRF versus home in unadjusted regression (OR 0.62, 95%CI 0.42-0.92, p=0.016). The lower odds of discharge to IRF persisted in the multivariable model (aOR 0.16, 95%CI 0.09-0.31, p<0.001) despite a significant increase in discharge disability (median discharge mRS 4 [IQR 2-4] vs. 2 [IQR 1-3], p<0.001) during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Admission for stroke during the COVID-19 pandemic was associated with a significantly lower probability of being discharged to an IRF. This effect persisted despite adjustment for predictors of IRF disposition, including functional disability at discharge. Potential reasons for this disparity are explored.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Patient Discharge/trends , Patient Transfer/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Stroke Rehabilitation/trends , Stroke/therapy , Aged , Disability Evaluation , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New Jersey , Recovery of Function , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/physiopathology , Time Factors
3.
J Neurointerv Surg ; 2021 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1072792

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Unprecedented workflow shifts during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have contributed to delays in acute care delivery, but whether it adversely affected endovascular thrombectomy metrics in acute large vessel occlusion (LVO) is unknown. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of observational data from 14 comprehensive stroke centers in nine US states with acute LVO. EVT metrics were compared between March to July 2019 against March to July 2020 (primary analysis), and between state-specific pre-peak and peak COVID-19 months (secondary analysis), with multivariable adjustment. RESULTS: Of the 1364 patients included in the primary analysis (51% female, median NIHSS 14 [IQR 7-21], and 74% of whom underwent EVT), there was no difference in the primary outcome of door-to-puncture (DTP) time between the 2019 control period and the COVID-19 period (median 71 vs 67 min, P=0.10). After adjustment for variables associated with faster DTP, and clustering by site, there remained a trend toward shorter DTP during the pandemic (ßadj=-73.2, 95% CI -153.8-7.4, Pp=0.07). There was no difference in DTP times according to local COVID-19 peaks vs pre-peak months in unadjusted or adjusted multivariable regression (ßadj=-3.85, 95% CI -36.9-29.2, P=0.80). In this final multivariable model (secondary analysis), faster DTP times were significantly associated with transfer from an outside institution (ßadj=-46.44, 95% CI -62.8 to - -30.0, P<0.01) and higher NIHSS (ßadj=-2.15, 95% CI -4.2to - -0.1, P=0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In this multi-center study, there was no delay in EVT among patients treated for intracranial occlusion during the COVID-19 era compared with the pre-COVID era.

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