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2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-296187

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV2 is a new coronavirus which started spreading in December 2019 from Wuhan, China. The seroprevalence of SARS-CoV2 antibodies allows to define a better picture of the spread of SARS-CoV2 infection in the population. The duration of SARS-CoV2 antibodies in the healthy population as well as in immunocompromised patients is still a topic of debate. HIV-infected people are at increased risk of developing complications from contracting a viral illness. Furthermore,their ability to develop and maintain an optimal immunological response to any kind of pathogen appears to be reduced.We analyzed the overall seroprevalence of SARS-CoV2 antibodies in 85 HIV infected-people on ART aged between 5 and 34 years old from May to January 2021. 88,2%of patients were in a good state of viroimmunological control: 23 showed a VL<40cp/ml and 52 had an undetectable VL. When positive for SARS-CoV2 serology, a confirmatory nasopharyngeal swab for PCR assessment and a second serological assay would be performed.Out of the 85 patients, 5 proved to be positive for SARS-CoV2 antibodies (rate of prevalence 5.8%). In all 5 cases the nasopharyngeal swabs were negative and the second assay for SARS-CoV2 antibodies performed in 4 out of 5 patients a week later was negative as well. The anamnestic recall brought no elements of suspicion for a past infection.The duration of SARS-CoV2 antibodies after COVID19 disease is still poorly understood in healthy population and additional studies will be needed to define the durability of humoral responses in immunocompromised children and in particular in HIV infected children under effective ART. It is still unknown whether ART or their immunological impairment may in part mitigate the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Also, it will be interesting to analyze the impact of vaccination against SARS-CoV2 in HIV infected patients with a satisfactory virological control.

3.
Cells ; 10(10)2021 09 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438527

ABSTRACT

Specific memory B cells and antibodies are a reliable read-out of vaccine efficacy. We analysed these biomarkers after one and two doses of BNT162b2 vaccine. The second dose significantly increases the level of highly specific memory B cells and antibodies. Two months after the second dose, specific antibody levels decline, but highly specific memory B cells continue to increase, thus predicting a sustained protection from COVID-19. We show that although mucosal IgA is not induced by the vaccination, memory B cells migrate in response to inflammation and secrete IgA at mucosal sites. We show that the first vaccine dose may lead to an insufficient number of highly specific memory B cells and low concentration of serum antibodies, thus leaving vaccinees without the immune robustness needed to ensure viral elimination and herd immunity. We also clarify that the reduction of serum antibodies does not diminish the force and duration of the immune protection induced by vaccination. The vaccine does not induce sterilizing immunity. Infection after vaccination may be caused by the lack of local preventive immunity because of the absence of mucosal IgA.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/cytology , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunologic Memory , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antigens, Viral/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cryopreservation , Female , Health Personnel , Healthy Volunteers , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Lactation , Male , Middle Aged , Mucous Membrane/immunology , Patient Safety , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
4.
Clin Chim Acta ; 522: 144-151, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363909

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Vaccines, to limit SARS-CoV-2 infection, were produced and reliable assays are needed for their evaluation. The WHO produced an International-Standard (WHO-IS) to facilitate the standardization/comparison of serological methods. The WHO-IS, produced in limited amount, was never tested for reproducibility. This study aims at developing a reproducible and accessible working standard (WS) to complement the WHO-IS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sera from vaccinated individuals were used to produce the WSs. The WHO-IS, the WSs and single serum samples (n = 48) were tested on 6 quantitative serological devices. Neutralization assays were performed for the 48 samples and compared with their antibody titers. RESULTS: The WS carry an antibody titer 20-fold higher than the WHO-IS. It was reproducible, showed both good linearity and insignificant intra- and inter-laboratory variability. However, the WSs behave differently from the WHO-IS. Analysis of the 48 samples showed that single correlation factors are not sufficient to harmonize results from different assays. Yet, all the devices predict neutralization activity based on the antibody titer. CONCLUSIONS: A reproducible and highly concentrated WS, specific for IgG against SARS-CoV-2 Spike-glycoprotein was produced. Such characteristics make it particularly suited for the harmonization of commercially available assays and the consequent evaluation of post-vaccinated individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , Neutralization Tests , Reproducibility of Results
5.
Pediatr Res ; 2021 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1265938

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The objective of this study is to test how certain signs and symptoms related to COVID-19 in children predict the positivity or negativity of the SARS-CoV-2 nasopharyngeal swab in children. METHODS: We review the data of children who were tested for SARS-CoV-2 for a suspected infection. We compared the clinical characteristics of the subjects who tested positive and negative, including the sensibility, positive and negative predictive value of different combination of signs and symptoms. RESULTS: Of all the suspected infected, 2596 tested negative (96.2%) and 103 tested positive (3.8%). The median age was 7.0 and 5.3 years for the positive and negative ones, respectively. The female to male ratio was ~1:1.3. Fever and respiratory symptoms were mostly reported. Most positive children had a prior exposure to SARS-CoV-2-infected subjects (59.2%). A total of 99.3% of patients without fever nor exposure to the virus proved negative to the SARS-CoV-2 test. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that a child without fever or contact with infected subjects is SARS-CoV-2 negative. If this were to be confirmed, many resources would be spared, with improved care of both COVID-19 and not COVID-19-affected children. IMPACT: Key message: lack of fever and exposure to SARS-CoV-2-infected people highly predicts a negative results of the SARS-CoV-2 nasopharyngeal swab in the paediatric population. Added value to the current literature: this is the first article to prove this point. IMPACT: reduction of emergency department accesses of children with suspected SARS-CoV-2 infection; increased outpatient management of children with cough or other common respiratory symptoms of infancy; sparing of many human and material health resources.

8.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 23, 2021 Feb 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1061200

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the first SARS-CoV-2 pandemic phase, the sudden closure of schools was one of the main measures to minimize the spread of the virus. In the second phase, several safety procedures were implemented to avoid school closure. To evaluate if the school is a safe place, students and staff of two school complexes of Rome were monitored to evaluate the efficacy of prevention measures inside the school buildings. METHODS: Oral secretions specimens were collected from 1262 subjects for a total of 3431 samples, collected over a 3 months period. Detection of Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 was performed by real-time PCR. Target genes were represented by E gene, RdRP/S gene and N gene. RESULTS: Among the 3431 samples analyzed, just 16 sample resulted as positive or low positive: 1 sample in the first month, 12 samples in the second month and 3 in the third month. In each period of evaluation, all positive children attended different classes. CONCLUSIONS: Even if the school has the potential for spreading viruses, our preliminary results show the efficacy of the implementations undertaken in this setting to minimize virus diffusion. Our evidence suggests that school does not act as an amplifier for transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and can be really considered a safe place for students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , School Health Services/organization & administration , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
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