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1.
J Crit Care ; 71: 154115, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2015608

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Death is common in intensive care units, and integrating palliative care enhances outcomes. Most research has been conducted in high-income countries. The aim is to understand what is known about the type and topics of research on the provision of palliative care within intensive care units in low- and middle-income countries MATERIALS AND METHODS: Scoping review with nine databases systematically searched for literature published in English on palliative care in intensive care units in low- and middle- income settings (01/01/1990 to 31/05/2021). Two reviewers independently checked search results and extracted textual data, which were analyzed and represented as themes. RESULTS: Thirty papers reported 19 empirical studies, two clinical case reports and six discussion papers. Papers originated from Asia and Africa, primarily using observational designs and qualitative approaches, with no trials or other robust evaluative or comparative studies. No studies directly sought data from patients or families. Five areas of research focus were identified: withholding and withdrawing treatment; professional knowledge and skills; patient and family views; culture and context; and costs of care. CONCLUSIONS: Palliative care in intensive care units in low-and middle-income countries is understudied. Research focused on the specific needs of intensive care in low- and middle-income countries is required to ensure optimal patient outcomes.


Subject(s)
Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing , Terminal Care , Developing Countries , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Palliative Care
2.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 28(3): 272-279, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1998154

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Palliative care (PC) referral in serious and critical COVID-19 improves decision-making, health resource utilisation, end-of-life symptom management and family support. In this study, we explored developing a systematic decision-making matrix for PC referral in COVID-19 and audited its outcomes. Materials and Methods: A team of interdisciplinary experts developed a hospital COVID-19 PC plan. PC referral and outcomes of PC referral in hospitalised COVID-19 patients were audited. Results: Out of 1575 inpatients, 1066 (67.7%) had mild and 509 (32.3%) had serious and critical COVID-19 illness. Among 50 (3.1%) referred to PC, 5 (0.4%) had mild and 45 (8.8%) had serious and critical COVID-19 illness. Out of 45 serious and critical COVID-19 patients referred to PC, 38 (84%) received end-of-life care (EOLC), 4 (9%) self-discharged against medical advice and 3 (7%) recovered. Forty-seven (94%) were referred for goals-of-care discussion. About 78% received opioids, 70% benzodiazepines and 42% haloperidol for symptom management. Among 45 serious and critical COVID-19 patients referred to PC, foregoing life-sustaining treatment was documented in 43 (96%) but implemented only in 23 (53%). Out of 38 who received EOLC, ICU was the place of death in 31 (82%) and ward in 7 (18%). Conclusion: Despite interdisciplinary experts developing a hospital COVID-19 PC, low referral of serious and critical COVID-19 patients to PC was observed. PC referral enabled access to management of end-of-life symptoms and facilitated limitation of life-sustaining treatment in some COVID-19 patients with serious illness. Educating critical care physicians about the scope of PC in the COVID-19 setting might improve PC referral.

3.
Psychooncology ; 2022 Jul 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1913871

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a complex and profound impact on the provision of palliative care globally. To support learning from palliative care providers and researchers worldwide, the Education Subcommittee of International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS) Palliative Care Special Interest Group developed a webinar with presentations by and discussion with eight international palliative care leaders. METHODS: Presentations were content rich; the speakers used both quantitative (e.g., sharing recent statistical findings) and qualitative (e.g., narrative storytelling, anecdotal experiences) approaches to portray the effect of COVID-19 in their region. Subsequent to the webinar, the committee collectively identified five themes conveyed by the presenters through consensus. RESULTS: The themes included: (1) altered accessibility to palliative care, with socio-economic status impacting virtual health availability; (2) reduced opportunities to preserve dignity, as survival has been prioritized over preserving the humanity of patients and their loved ones; (3) complicated grief and bereavement arising from social distancing requirements; (4) greater awareness of the importance of sustaining health provider well-being; and (5) the development of valuable innovations across nations, institutions, disciplines, and communities. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the webinar facilitated valuable connection for global learning and identified opportunities for research and clinical interventions. In an ongoing crisis that has exacerbated isolation, we will need to continue to learn and lean on one another as a global community to navigate ongoing challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

4.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S8-S16, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792231

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Palliative care has an important role to play in the global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. It is integrated and is a key component in the governmental and community structures and services in Kerala, in India. Palliative care in the state has grown to be a viable model recognized in global palliative care and public health scene. The community network of palliative care, especially the volunteers linking with clinical teams, is a strong force for advocacy, relief support including provision of emergency medications, and clinical care. OBJECTIVE: To develop a palliative care resource tool kit for holistic care of patients affected with COVID-19 and to support the health-care workers looking after them to enable palliative care integration with COVID-I9 management. METHODS: The Kerala State government included senior palliative care advisors in the COVID-19 task force and 22 palliative care professionals formed a virtual task force named Palli COVID Kerala as an immediate response to develop recommendations. Results: Developed a palliative care in COVID-19 resource toolkit which includes an e-book with palliative care recommendations, online training opportunities, short webinars and voice over power point presentations. CONCLUSION: Integrated Palliative care should be an essential part of any response to a humanitarian crisis. The e resource tool kit can be adapted for use in other low- and middle-income countries.

5.
Ecancermedicalscience ; 14: ed107, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100034

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-19 was declared a pandemic and global emergency in March 2020. Oncology education and training has been on a rollercoaster ride ever since. Despite major changes in the work environment, training for postgraduates in oncology has continued with various challenges. We discuss the changes brought about in education, training and assessments for oncology residents.

6.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S116-S120, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-706803

ABSTRACT

In a resource-poor country like India, where the health-care systems are difficult to access, overburdened, and unaffordable to many, the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic can be devastating. The increased burden of serious health-related suffering can impact the well-being of health-care workers, patients, and their families alike. The elderly, the frail, the vulnerable, and those with multiple comorbidities are disproportionately affected. Palliative care, with its comprehensive and inclusive approach, has much to offer in terms of alleviating the suffering, particularly those caused by the distressing physical and psycho-socio-spiritual symptoms, the complex medical decision-making, end-of-life care issues, and grief and bereavement, and needs to be integrated into the pathway of care provision in COVID-19. Psychosocial issues contribute to and amplify suffering and are often underestimated and undertreated and not accessible to many. Empowering frontline professionals in the core concepts of psychosocial support and palliative care thus becomes an absolute necessity. This quick review was done by a group of palliative care physicians and mental health experts from India to develop recommendations for physical and psychosocial care in the context of COVID-19. This review was done as part of that process and highlights the role and challenges of the psychosocial domain of palliative care in the context of COVID-19 situation in India.

7.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S3-S7, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-704927

ABSTRACT

The global pandemic involving severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 has brought new challenges to clinical practice and care in the provision of palliative care. This position statement of the Indian Association of Palliative Care (IAPC) represents the collective opinion of the experts chosen by the society and reports on the current situation based on recent scientific evidence. It purports to guide all health-care professionals caring for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients and recommends palliative care principles into government decisions and policies. The statement provides recommendations for palliative care for both adults and children with severe COVID-19 illness, cancer, and chronic end-stage organ impairment in the hospital, hospice, and home setting. Holistic care incorporating physical, psychological, social, and spiritual support for patients and their families together with recommendations on the rational use of personal protective equipment has been discussed in brief. Detailed information can be accessed freely from the website of the IAPC http://www.palliativecare.in/. We hope that this position statement will serve as a guiding light in these uncertain times.

8.
Indian J Psychol Med ; 42(4): 353-358, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-633798

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused great financial and psychological havoc. Healthcare professionals (HCPs) are among the many groups of people who are in the frontline and facing a risk of direct exposure to the virus. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and predictors of stress, depressive, and anxiety symptoms among HCPs of India. METHODS: It was a cross-sectional, online survey conducted in April 2020 among HCPs who are directly involved in the triage, screening, diagnosing, and treatment of COVID-19 patients and suspects. Stress was estimated using Cohen's perceived stress scale. Depression and anxiety were assessed using the tools Public Health Questionnaire-9 and Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7. Predictors were analyzed using univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression. RESULTS: A total of 433 online responses were obtained, and N = 350 were finally included. The prevalence (95% CI) of HCPs with high-level stress was 3.7% (2.2, 6.2), while the prevalence rates of HCPs with depressive symptoms requiring treatment and anxiety symptoms requiring further evaluation were 11.4% (8.3, 15.2) and 17.7% (13.9, 22.1), respectively. Women had approximately two times the increased odds of developing moderate- or high-level stress, depressive symptoms requiring treatment, and anxiety symptoms requiring further evaluation. Similarly, women staying in a hostel/temporary accommodation had two times the increased odds of developing depression or anxiety symptoms. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of stress, depressive, and anxiety symptoms among HCPs in India during the pandemic is comparable with other countries.

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