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1.
J Fungi (Basel) ; 9(1)2023 Jan 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2200440

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The incidence of candidemia in severe COVID-19 patients (0.8-14%) is two- to ten-fold higher than in non-COVID-19 patients. METHODS: This retrospective analysis aimed to analyse the incidence of bloodstream infections (BSI) due to Candida in a cohort of COVID-19 patients supported with ECMO. RESULTS: Among 138 intubated and ventilated patients hospitalized for ≥10 days in the intensive care unit of a teaching hospital, 45 (32.6%) patients received ECMO support, while 93 patients (67.4%) did not meet ECMO criteria and were considered the control group. In the ECMO group, 16 episodes of candidaemia were observed, while only 13 in patients of the control group (36.0% vs. 14.0%, p-value 0.004). It was confirmed at the survival analysis (SHR: 2.86, 95% CI: 1.39-5.88) and at the multivariable analyses (aSHR: 3.91, 95% CI: 1.73-8.86). A higher candida score seemed to increase the hazard for candidemia occurrence (aSHR: 3.04, 95% CI: 2.09-4.42), while vasopressor therapy was negatively associated with the outcome (aSHR: 0.15, 95% CI: 0.05-0.43). CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that the incidence of candidemia was significantly higher in critically ill COVID-19 patients supported with VV-ECMO than in critically ill COVID patients who did not meet criteria for VV-ECMO.

2.
Antibiotics (Basel) ; 11(7)2022 Jul 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963673

ABSTRACT

Two mutually related pandemics are ongoing worldwide: the COVID-19 and antimicrobial resistance pandemics. This study aims to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on multi-drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GN) bloodstream infections (BSIs) in a single intensive care unit (ICU). We conducted a retrospective study including patients admitted to the ICU, reorganized for COVID-19 patients' healthcare, with at least one confirmed MDR-GN BSI during 2019-2020. We compared clinical and microbiological features, incidence density, antibiotic therapy and mortality rate in pre- and during-COVID-19 pandemic periods. We estimated the impact of COVID-19 on mortality by means of univariate Cox regression analyses. A total of 46 patients were included in the study (28 non-COVID-19/18 COVID-19). Overall, 63 BSI episodes occurred (44/19), and non-COVID-19 patients had a higher incidence of MDR-GN BSIs and were more likely to present K. pneumoniae BSIs, while the COVID-19 group showed more A. baumannii BSIs with higher per pathogen incidence. COVID-19 patients presented more critical conditions at the BSI onset, a shorter hospitalization time from BSI to death and higher 30-day mortality rate from BSI onset. COVID-19 and septic shock were associated with 30-day mortality from MDR-GN BSIs, while early active therapy was a protective factor. In conclusion, COVID-19 showed a negative impact on patients with MDR-GN BSIs admitted to the ICU.

3.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 41(3): 495-500, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603573

ABSTRACT

The objective was to study ceftazidime-avibactam resistant and susceptible Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from a patient admitted to the Policlinico Umberto I of Rome for SARS-CoV2. Data on the evolution of patient's conditions, antimicrobial therapies, and microbiological data were collected. Whole-genome sequencing performed by Illumina and Nanopore sequencing methods were used to type the strains. During the hospitalization, a SARS-CoV2-infected patient was colonized by a KPC-producing K. pneumoniae strain and empirically treated with ceftazidime-avibactam (CZA) when presenting spiking fever symptoms. Successively, ST2502 CZA-resistant strain producing the KPC-31 variant gave a pulmonary infection to the patient. The infection was treated with high doses of meropenem. The KPC-31-producing strain disappeared but the patient remained colonized by a KPC-3-producing K. pneumoniae strain. An interplay between highly conserved KPC-31- and KPC-3-producing ST2502 strains occurred in the SARS-CoV2 patient during the hospitalization, selected by CZA and carbapenem treatments, respectively.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents , COVID-19 , Klebsiella Infections , Meropenem , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , COVID-19/complications , Ceftazidime/therapeutic use , Drug Combinations , Humans , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella pneumoniae/genetics , Meropenem/therapeutic use , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , beta-Lactamases/genetics
4.
J Med Virol ; 93(7): 4319-4325, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118173

ABSTRACT

Teicoplanin has a potential antiviral activity expressed against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and was suggested as a complementary option to treat coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. In this multicentric, retrospective, observational research the aim was to evaluate the impact of teicoplanin on the course of COVID-19 in critically ill patients. Fifty-five patients with severe COVID-19, hospitalized in the intensive care units (ICUs) and treated with best available therapy were retrospectively analysed. Among them 34 patients were also treated with teicoplanin (Tei-COVID group), while 21 without teicoplanin (control group). Crude in-hospital Day-30 mortality was lower in Tei-COVID group (35.2%) than in control group (42.8%), however not reaching statistical significance (p = .654). No statistically significant differences in length of stay in the ICU were observed between Tei-COVID group and control group (p = .248). On Day 14 from the ICU hospitalization, viral clearance was achieved in 64.7% patients of Tei-COVID group and 57.1% of control group, without statistical difference. Serum C-reactive protein level was significantly reduced in Tei-COVID group compared to control group, but not other biochemical parameters. Finally, Gram-positive were the causative pathogens for 25% of BSIs in Tei-COVID group and for 70.6% in controls. No side effects related to teicoplanin use were observed. Despite several limitations require further research, in this study the use of teicoplanin is not associated with a significant improvement in outcomes analysed. The antiviral activity of teicoplanin against SARS-CoV-2, previously documented, is probably more effective at early clinical stages.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 Drug Treatment , Hospital Mortality , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Teicoplanin/therapeutic use , Aged , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
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