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5.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 42(3): 102917, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064785

ABSTRACT

Mortality from COVID-19 has obscured a subtler crisis - the swelling ranks of COVID-19 survivors. After critical illness, patients often suffer post-intensive care syndrome (PICS), which encompasses physical, cognitive, and/or mental health impairments that are often long-lasting barriers to resuming a meaningful life. Some deficits after COVID-19 critical illness will require otolaryngologic expertise for years after hospital discharge. There are roles for all subspecialties in preventing, diagnosing, or treating sequelae of COVID-19. Otolaryngologist leadership in multidisciplinary efforts ensures coordinated care. Timely tracheostomy, when indicated, may shorten the course of intensive care unit stay and thereby potentially reduce the impairments associated with PICS. Otolaryngologists can provide expertise in olfactory disorders; thrombotic sequelae of hearing loss and vertigo; and laryngotracheal injuries that impair speech, voice, swallowing, communication, and breathing. In the aftermath of severe COVID-19, otolaryngologists are poised to lead efforts in early identification and intervention for impairments affecting patients' quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Critical Illness/therapy , Otolaryngologists , Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases/etiology , Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases/therapy , Quality of Life , Survivorship , Critical Care/methods , Humans , Intensive Care Units , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Ann Surg ; 272(3): e181-e186, 2020 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066507

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the outcomes of patients undergoing tracheostomy for COVID-19 and of healthcare workers performing these procedures. BACKGROUND: Tracheostomy is often performed for prolonged endotracheal intubation in critically ill patients. However, in the context of COVID-19, tracheostomy placement pathways have been altered due to the poor prognosis of intubated patients and the risk of transmission to providers through this highly aerosolizing procedure. METHODS: A prospective single-system multi-center observational cohort study was performed on patients who underwent tracheostomy after acute respiratory failure secondary to COVID-19. RESULTS: Of the 53 patients who underwent tracheostomy, the average time from endotracheal intubation to tracheostomy was 19.7 days ±â€Š6.9 days. The most common indication for tracheostomy was acute respiratory distress syndrome, followed by failure to wean ventilation and post-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation decannulation. Thirty patients (56.6%) were liberated from the ventilator, 16 (30.2%) have been discharged alive, 7 (13.2%) have been decannulated, and 6 (11.3%) died. The average time from tracheostomy to ventilator liberation was 11.8 days ±â€Š6.9 days (range 2-32 days). Both open surgical and percutaneous dilational tracheostomy techniques were performed utilizing methods to mitigate aerosols. No healthcare worker transmissions resulted from performing the procedure. CONCLUSIONS: Alterations to tracheostomy practices and processes were successfully instituted. Following these steps, tracheostomy in COVID-19 intubated patients seems safe for both patients and healthcare workers performing the procedure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care , Intubation, Intratracheal , Respiration, Artificial , Tracheostomy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
8.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 164(6): 1136-1147, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-901656

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to a global surge in critically ill patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation, some of whom may benefit from tracheostomy. Decisions on if, when, and how to perform tracheostomy in patients with COVID-19 have major implications for patients, clinicians, and hospitals. We investigated the tracheostomy protocols and practices that institutions around the world have put into place in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. DATA SOURCES: Protocols for tracheostomy in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection from individual institutions (n = 59) were obtained from the United States and 25 other countries, including data from several low- and middle-income countries, 23 published or society-endorsed protocols, and 36 institutional protocols. REVIEW METHODS: The comparative document analysis involved cross-sectional review of institutional protocols and practices. Data sources were analyzed for timing of tracheostomy, contraindications, preoperative testing, personal protective equipment (PPE), surgical technique, and postoperative management. CONCLUSIONS: Timing of tracheostomy varied from 3 to >21 days, with over 90% of protocols recommending 14 days of intubation prior to tracheostomy. Most protocols advocate delaying tracheostomy until COVID-19 testing was negative. All protocols involved use of N95 or higher PPE. Both open and percutaneous techniques were reported. Timing of tracheostomy changes ranged from 5 to >30 days postoperatively, sometimes contingent on negative COVID-19 test results. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Wide variation exists in tracheostomy protocols, reflecting geographical variation, different resource constraints, and limited data to drive evidence-based care standards. Findings presented herein may provide reference points and a framework for evolving care standards.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control , Internationality , Perioperative Care , Tracheostomy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Clinical Protocols , Humans , Practice Patterns, Physicians'
9.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 164(5): 984-1000, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-788420

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In the chronic phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, questions have arisen regarding the care of patients with a tracheostomy and downstream management. This review addresses gaps in the literature regarding posttracheostomy care, emphasizing safety of multidisciplinary teams, coordinating complex care needs, and identifying and managing late complications of prolonged intubation and tracheostomy. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Google Scholar, institutional guidance documents. REVIEW METHODS: Literature through June 2020 on the care of patients with a tracheostomy was reviewed, including consensus statements, clinical practice guidelines, institutional guidance, and scientific literature on COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2 virology and immunology. Where data were lacking, expert opinions were aggregated and adjudicated to arrive at consensus recommendations. CONCLUSIONS: Best practices in caring for patients after a tracheostomy during the COVID-19 pandemic are multifaceted, encompassing precautions during aerosol-generating procedures; minimizing exposure risks to health care workers, caregivers, and patients; ensuring safe, timely tracheostomy care; and identifying and managing laryngotracheal injury, such as vocal fold injury, posterior glottic stenosis, and subglottic stenosis that may affect speech, swallowing, and airway protection. We present recommended approaches to tracheostomy care, outlining modifications to conventional algorithms, raising vigilance for heightened risks of bleeding or other complications, and offering recommendations for personal protective equipment, equipment, care protocols, and personnel. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Treatment of patients with a tracheostomy in the COVID-19 pandemic requires foresight and may rival procedural considerations in tracheostomy in their complexity. By considering patient-specific factors, mitigating transmission risks, optimizing the clinical environment, and detecting late manifestations of severe COVID-19, clinicians can ensure due vigilance and quality care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/standards , Postoperative Care , Tracheostomy , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
10.
OTO Open ; 4(3): 2473974X20948835, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729457

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Nonphysician health care workers are involved in high-risk patient care during the COVID-19 pandemic, placing them at high risk of mental health burden. The mental health impact of COVID-19 in this crucial population has not been studied thus far. Thus, the objective of this study is to assess the psychosocial well-being of these providers. STUDY DESIGN: National cross-sectional online survey (no control group). SETTING: Academic otolaryngology programs in the United States. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We distributed a survey to nonphysician health care workers in otolaryngology departments across the United States. The survey incorporated a variety of validated mental health assessment tools to measure participant burnout (Mini-Z assessment), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), distress (Impact of Event Scale), and depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-2). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to determine predictive factors associated with these mental health outcomes. RESULTS: We received 347 survey responses: 248 (71.5%) nurses, 63 (18.2%) administrative staff, and 36 (10.4%) advanced practice providers. A total of 104 (30.0%) respondents reported symptoms of burnout; 241 (69.5%), symptoms of anxiety; 292 (84.1%), symptoms of at least mild distress; and 79 (22.8%), symptoms of depression. Upon further analysis, development of these symptoms was associated with factors such as occupation, practice setting, and case load. CONCLUSION: Frontline otolaryngology health care providers exhibit high rates of mental health complications, particularly anxiety and distress, in the wake of COVID-19. Adequate support systems must be put into place to address these issues.

11.
Head Neck ; 42(7): 1507-1515, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614117

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus has altered the health care environment for the management of head and neck cancers. The purpose of these guidelines is to provide direction during the pandemic for rational Head and Neck Cancer management in order to achieve a medically and ethically appropriate balance of risks and benefits. METHODS: Creation of consensus document. RESULTS: The process yielded a consensus statement among a wide range of practitioners involved in the management of patients with head and neck cancer in a multihospital tertiary care health system. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines support an ethical approach for the management of head and neck cancers during the COVID-19 epidemic consistent with both the local standard of care as well as the head and neck oncological literature.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Infection Control/standards , Medical Oncology/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Ambulatory Care/standards , COVID-19 , Combined Modality Therapy , Continuity of Patient Care/standards , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Head and Neck Neoplasms/diagnosis , Humans , Multi-Institutional Systems , Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Palliative Care/standards , Patient Safety , Pennsylvania , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Terminal Care/standards , Tertiary Care Centers
12.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 163(5): 934-937, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611164

ABSTRACT

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on otolaryngology practice is nowhere more evident than in acute airway management. Considerations of preventing SARS-CoV-2 transmission, conserving personal protective equipment, and prioritizing care delivery based on acuity have dictated clinical decision making in the acute phase of the pandemic. With transition to a more chronic state of pandemic, heightened vigilance is necessary to recognize how deferral of care in patients with tenuous airways and COVID-19 infection may lead to acute airway compromise. Furthermore, it is critical to respect the continuing importance of flexible laryngoscopy in diagnosis. Safely managing airways during the pandemic requires thoughtful multidisciplinary planning. Teams should consider trade-offs among aerosol-generating procedures involving direct laryngoscopy, supraglottic airway use, fiberoptic intubation, and tracheostomy. We share clinical cases that illustrate enduring principles of acute airway management. As algorithms evolve, time-honored approaches for diagnosis and management of acute airway pathology remain essential in ensuring patient safety.


Subject(s)
Aerosols/administration & dosage , Airway Management/methods , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Humans , Infant , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
14.
World J Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 6: S36-S39, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-548040

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: The COVID-19 pandemic is characterized by high transmissibility from patients with prolonged minimally- or asymptomatic periods, with a particularly increased risk of spread during aerosol-generating procedures, including endotracheal intubation. OBSERVATIONS: All patients presenting with upper airway obstruction due to angioedema during this time should be carefully managed in a way that is safest for both patient and provider. CONCLUSIONS: For patients requiring emergent airway management during the COVID-19 pandemic, minimization of aerosols while taking the necessary precautions to protect healthcare workers should are critical principles for their management.

15.
Head Neck ; 42(7): 1597-1609, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-526661

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Otolaryngologists are among the highest risk for COVID-19 exposure. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional, survey-based, national study evaluating academic otolaryngologists. Burnout, anxiety, distress, and depression were assessed by the single-item Mini-Z Burnout Assessment, 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, 15-item Impact of Event Scale, and 2-item Patient Health Questionnaire, respectively. RESULTS: A total of 349 physicians completed the survey. Of them, 165 (47.3%) were residents and 212 (60.7%) were males. Anxiety, distress, burnout, and depression were reported in 167 (47.9%), 210 (60.2%), 76 (21.8%), and 37 (10.6%) physicians, respectively. Attendings had decreased burnout relative to residents (odds ratio [OR] 0.28, confidence interval [CI] [0.11-0.68]; P = .005). Females had increased burnout (OR 1.93, CI [1.12.-3.32]; P = .018), anxiety (OR 2.53, CI [1.59-4.02]; P < .005), and distress (OR 2.68, CI [1.64-4.37]; P < .005). Physicians in states with greater than 20 000 positive cases had increased distress (OR 2.01, CI [1.22-3.31]; P = .006). CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the prevalence of burnout, anxiety, and distress is high among academic otolaryngologists.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Internship and Residency , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Otolaryngologists/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Otolaryngologists/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
16.
Lancet Respir Med ; 8(7): 717-725, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-276408

ABSTRACT

Global health care is experiencing an unprecedented surge in the number of critically ill patients who require mechanical ventilation due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The requirement for relatively long periods of ventilation in those who survive means that many are considered for tracheostomy to free patients from ventilatory support and maximise scarce resources. COVID-19 provides unique challenges for tracheostomy care: health-care workers need to safely undertake tracheostomy procedures and manage patients afterwards, minimising risks of nosocomial transmission and compromises in the quality of care. Conflicting recommendations exist about case selection, the timing and performance of tracheostomy, and the subsequent management of patients. In response, we convened an international working group of individuals with relevant expertise in tracheostomy. We did a literature and internet search for reports of research pertaining to tracheostomy during the COVID-19 pandemic, supplemented by sources comprising statements and guidance on tracheostomy care. By synthesising early experiences from countries that have managed a surge in patient numbers, emerging virological data, and international, multidisciplinary expert opinion, we aim to provide consensus guidelines and recommendations on the conduct and management of tracheostomy during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Internationality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Tracheostomy/methods , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Critical Care/methods , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Head Neck ; 42(6): 1273-1277, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-143443

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This case highlights challenges in the assessment and management of the "difficult airway" patient in the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic era. METHODS: A 60-year-old male with history of recent transoral robotic surgery resection, free flap reconstruction, and tracheostomy for p16+ squamous cell carcinoma presented with stridor and dyspnea 1 month after decannulation. Careful planning by a multidisciplinary team allowed for appropriate staffing and personal protective equipment, preparations for emergency airway management, evaluation via nasopharyngolaryngoscopy, and COVID testing. The patient was found to be COVID negative and underwent imaging which revealed new pulmonary nodules and a tracheal lesion. RESULTS: The patient was safely transorally intubated in the operating room. The tracheal lesion was removed endoscopically and tracheostomy was avoided. CONCLUSIONS: This case highlights the importance of careful and collaborative decision making for the management of head and neck cancer and other "difficult airway" patients during the COVID-19 epidemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Tonsillar Neoplasms/pathology , Tracheal Neoplasms/surgery , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Carcinoma, Squamous Cell/secondary , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Tracheal Neoplasms/secondary
18.
Head Neck ; 42(6): 1339-1343, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-133541

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic forced significant changes in current approach to outpatient evaluation of common otolaryngology complaints as hospitals around the world are trying to limit the spread of the virus and to preserve health care resources. These changes raise a lot of questions regarding patient triage and treatment decisions in clinical situations when it is unclear if the workup and management can be postponed. In this communication, we present our approach to evaluation and triage of new patients with complaints concerning for salivary gland disease.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Otolaryngology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Salivary Gland Diseases/diagnosis , Telemedicine , Triage , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Head Neck ; 42(6): 1131-1136, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-66373

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND METHODS: There is an added level of complexity in the management of head and neck cancer patients with underlying immunosuppressive disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic. Head and neck oncologists are tasked with balancing the dual risks of cancer progression in the setting of impaired tumor immunity and increased susceptibility to life-threatening complications from exposure to viral infection for patients and providers. Through two cases of immunocompromised patients with newly diagnosed head and neck malignancies, we aim to provide guidance to clinicians struggling with how to best counsel and manage this unique subset of patients under these difficult circumstances. RESULTS: After careful consideration of the options, we took different approaches in the care of these two patients. CONCLUSIONS: Ultimately, there is no uniform set of rules to apply to this heterogeneous group of immunocompromised patients. We provide some general principles to help guide patient management during the current pandemic.


Subject(s)
Conservative Treatment/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Immunocompromised Host , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Time-to-Treatment/organization & administration , Adult , COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Disease Management , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology , Humans , Interdisciplinary Communication , Laryngeal Neoplasms/pathology , Laryngeal Neoplasms/surgery , Male , Middle Aged , Mouth Neoplasms/pathology , Mouth Neoplasms/surgery , Patient Safety , Risk Assessment , Sampling Studies , Time Factors , United States , Vocal Cords/pathology , Vocal Cords/surgery
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