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1.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 72(3): 581-584, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1754324

ABSTRACT

Augmentative and Alternative Communication is an aided or unaided means of communication which supports existing communication abilities of an individual or replaces natural speech due to any speech and language disorder. The deficit could be developmental or acquired such as autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy, learning difficulties, dysarthria, dyspraxia or due to any acquired neurological condition such as aphasia and other degenerative disorders. Furthermore, it may be due to surgical procedures such as laryngectomy. Alternate means of communication have also been successfully used with COVID-19 patients. These tools may include pictures, symbols, signs or voice output devices. Parents of children with special needs and medical professionals have been reluctant in implementing the approach due to certain misconceptions. The aim of this review is to summarize the current evidence for the use of Augmentative and Alternative Communication with a range of disorders in relation to in relation to Pakistan.


Subject(s)
Communication Aids for Disabled , Communication Disorders , Language Therapy , Autism Spectrum Disorder/complications , COVID-19/complications , Child , Communication , Communication Disorders/etiology , Communication Disorders/rehabilitation , Humans , Language Therapy/instrumentation , Language Therapy/methods , Pakistan , Speech , Speech Therapy/instrumentation , Speech Therapy/methods
2.
Life (Basel) ; 12(3)2022 Mar 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732113

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Few studies have explored the determinants of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the elderly during the COVID-19 pandemic. Identifying these factors may help implement appropriate policies to enhance HRQoL in the elderly. Therefore, we aimed to identify the predictors of physical and mental component summary (PCS and MCS) scores of HRQoL in selected six low- and middle-income Asian countries. METHODS: We conducted an online survey of older people aged ≥55 years in six countries: Bangladesh, Iran, Iraq, Malaysia, Palestine, and Sri Lanka. The Stark QoL questionnaire was used to measure the PCS and MCS scores. Univariate and multiple variable analyses after adjusting for confounders were performed to identify the possible predictors of PCS and MCS. RESULTS: A total of 1644 older people (69.1 ± 7.8 years, range 55-97 years, Female: 50.9%) responded to the survey. We documented age, country of residence, marital status, number of male children, current employment status, and health insurance, ability to pay household bills, frequency of family members visits and receiving support during COVID-19 pandemic predicted both PCS and MCS. However, gender, residence, and number of female children were associated with PCS only (all p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Socio-demographic factors such as age, country of residence, marital status, number of male children, current employment status, health insurance, ability to pay household bills, frequency of family members visiting family members, and receiving support during the COVID-19 pandemic affecting both physical and mental quality of life. These results can guide formulating health care planning policies to enhance QoL during COVID-19 and future pandemics in the elderly.

3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-304959

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease due to SARS-CoV-2 emerged in Wuhan city, China in December 2019 and rapidly spread more than 200 countries as a global health pandemic. There are more 3 million confirmed cases and around 207,000 fatalities. The primary manifestation is respiratory and cardiac but neurological manifestations are being reported in the literature as case reports and case series. The most common reported symptoms to include headache and dizziness followed by encephalopathy and delirium. Among the complications noted are Cerebrovascular accident, Guillian barre syndrome, acute transverse myelitis, and acute encephalitis. The most common peripheral manifestation was hyposmia. It is further noted that sometimes the neurological manifestations can precede the typical features like fever and cough and later on typical manifestations develop in these patients. Hence a high index of suspicion is required for timely diagnosis and isolation of cases to prevent the spread in neurology wards. We present a narrative review of the neurological manifestations and complications of COVID-19. Our aim is to update the neurologists and physicians working with suspected cases of COVID-19 about the possible neurological presentations and the probable neurological complications resulting from this novel virus infection.

4.
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak ; 31(12): 1391-1393, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1527130
7.
Turk J Phys Med Rehabil ; 66(4): 480-494, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000520

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic primarily affects the respiratory system. Elderly individuals with comorbidity are severely affected. Survivors weaned from mechanical ventilation are at a higher risk of developing post-intensive care syndrome (PICS). This scoping review, based on 40 recent publications, highlights pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in COVID-19. There is a paucity of high-quality research on this topic. However, rehabilitation societies including the Turkish Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation have issued PR recommendations in COVID-19 pneumonia with productive cough can benefit from diaphragmatic breathing, pursed-lip breathing, and resistance-breathing training. Besides, those in mechanical ventilation and post-PICS COVID-19 cases, oxygen therapy, early mobilization, airway clearance, aerobic exercise, gradual-graded limb muscle resistance exercise, nutritional and psychological interventions should be consideration. During PR, careful evaluation of vital signs and exercise-induced symptoms is also required. When in-person PR is not possible, telerehabilitation should be explored. However, the long-term effects of PR in COVID-19 need further evaluation.

8.
Heart Lung Circ ; 29(12): 1893-1894, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739827
9.
J Coll Physicians Surg Pak ; 30(6): 67-69, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690470

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has adversely affected economy, social life, and educational services all around the globe. Medical colleges and universities are facing challenges to provide quality education to their students during this prolonged period of lockdown. Technologically advanced countries have systems in place for e-learning and online medical education. This is not the case with most of the low-income countries like Pakistan. Here, we describe the challenges being faced by medical faculty members and students in Pakistan while engaging in online medical education during the COVID-19 pandemic. These include lack of faculty training and institutional support, internet connectivity issues, maintaining student engagement, online assessments, and problems with understanding the unique dynamics of online education. A collaborative approach involving all stakeholders, intuitional support, use of free online training resources, and out of box thinking can help overcome these challenges. Key Words: Analysis, E-learning, Coronavirus, Developing countries, Solutions.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance , Education, Medical/organization & administration , Learning , Students, Medical/psychology , Curriculum , Education, Medical/trends , Humans
10.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 70(Suppl 3)(5): S11-S14, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-609368

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is a recent pandemic which has spread to over 200 countries of the world since its outbreak. As of 21st April, 2020, more than 2.3 million confirmed cases have been reported. The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued a strategic preparedness response plan for countries at risk. This is based on the knowledge of previous epidemics and experience shared by Chinese health authorities. There is special emphasis on strict 'quarantine and isolation' of suspected/diagnosed cases. Pakistan is a developing country with a weak healthcare system. Pakistan Armed Forces have always provided services to the countrymen during natural and man-made disasters. During this pandemic the largest rehabilitation institute in the country was converted into a 130-bed dedicated isolation and quarantine facility for the COVID-19 patients. We will share our experience of establishing and managing this quarantine and isolation facility and highlight the achievements and out-of-the-box solutions applicable for low resource countries like Pakistan.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Disaster Planning , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Quarantine , COVID-19 , Contact Tracing , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disaster Planning/methods , Disaster Planning/organization & administration , Disinfection , Humans , Pakistan , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Population Surveillance , Public Health/methods , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 70(Suppl 3)(5): S166-S168, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-609367

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease-2019 outbreak has spread rapidly affecting 1.4 million people across the world in only four months. Healthcare fraternity is struggling to circumvent the consequences of this fast spreading infection and communicating their scientific discoveries through research publications. As a result, the scientific output on COVID-19 is growing rapidly and both the journal editors and authors are interested to publish results on scientific discoveries about it as soon as possible. However, novice and improperly trained authors are at high risk for getting duped by deceptive journals , which might keep their research unnoticed by the scientific and general community. This paper discusses these potential risks posed by deceptive (predatory) journals, for prospective authors and scientific community, during the COVID-19 outbreak. It also presents ways to address those risks and the role of journal editors and academic organisations.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Periodicals as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral , Publishing/standards , Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Humans , Periodicals as Topic/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , Scientific Misconduct
12.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 70(Suppl 3)(5): S162-S165, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-609361

ABSTRACT

The world has experienced pandemics worse than the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) which resulted in great loss of life and economy. However, the global effect of this pandemic has been devastating. Billions of people are in lockdown and isolation on six continents around the world. Most have easy access to information due to internet connectivity and electronic media, which has helped share information about the pandemic. However, information overload during the current COVID-19 pandemic has posed a set of challenges not encountered before. There is an "infodemic" in which false news, conspiracy theories, magical cures and racist news are being shared at an alarming rate, with the potential to increase anxiety and stress and even lead to loss of life. This review highlights some of these challenges and suggests general measures to avoid information overload and infodemic in the connected world of 21st century.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Health Education , Internet , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Global Health , Humans , Information Dissemination , Mental Health , Pakistan , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Clin Neurosci ; 77: 8-12, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-186409

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease due to SARS-CoV-2 emerged in Wuhan city, China in December 2019 and rapidly spread to more than 200 countries as a global health pandemic. There are more than 3.5 million confirmed cases and around 165,000 to 243,000 fatalities. The primary manifestation is respiratory and cardiac but neurological features are also being reported in the literature as case reports and case series. The most common reported symptoms to include headache and dizziness followed by encephalopathy and delirium. Among the complications noted are Cerebrovascular accident, Guillian barre syndrome, acute transverse myelitis, and acute encephalitis. The most common peripheral manifestation was hyposmia. It is further noted that sometimes the neurological manifestations can precede the typical features like fever and cough and later on typical manifestations develop in these patients. Hence a high index of suspicion is required for timely diagnosis and isolation of cases to prevent the spread in neurology wards. We present a narrative review of the neurological manifestations and complications of COVID-19. Our aim is to update the neurologists and physicians working with suspected cases of COVID-19 about the possible neurological presentations and the probable neurological complications resulting from this novel virus infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
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