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1.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S21-S26, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792222

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: The coronavirus pandemic has put an unprecedented burden on the health-care workers who are the cornerstone of the work system, preparing to mitigate its effects. Due to the lack of protective equipments, guidelines for managing patients, or proper training and education regarding the same, health care professionals (HCPs) working in non-COVID areas may face even greater problems than those working in COVID areas of a hospital. Our aim was to find out the concerns of HCPs working in non-COVID areas. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: After obtaining institutional ethics approval, a descriptive cross-sectional study was planned. An online Google-based questionnaire was rolled out to all doctors through various social media platforms who were dealing with COVID-negative patients. RESULTS: We received a total of 110 responses. 84.5% of participants were concerned about the risk of infection to self and family, 67.3% were concerned by the disruption of their daily activities. 56.4% of HCPs were disturbed by the lack of any concrete protocol for patient management. Less staff availability, delay in discharging duties toward their patients, and increased workload were other concerns. More than half of the doctors received N-95 masks whenever required and were trained in donning and doffing of Personal protective equipment. Sixty-eight percemt of our respondents labeled their current quality of life as stressful. CONCLUSION: It is the need of the hour to develop a comprehensive strategy focussing on the above challenges that HCPs working in non-COVID areas are facing. This will go a long way in not only providing holistic care to the patients but also in controlling this pandemic.

2.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S86-S89, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792219

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To understand the trend of prevalence of symptoms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, some studies have been conducted outside India, but for Indian patients, there is no such study available. Therefore, this study was designed to analyze the trends of symptoms in Indian patients during COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted on 100 patients (73 males, 24 females, and 3 transgenders) admitted under institutional isolation at a tertiary care center in India using a self-designed survey-based questionnaire. A descriptive analysis of results done based on age and sex. RESULTS: COVID incidence recorded is high in male (73%) as compared to female (24%), yet female patients have a higher prevalence of symptoms as compared to male patients. CONCLUSION: Male patients are more as far as COVID incidence is concerned, while female patients show high prevalence of symptoms as compared to male patients. Patients presenting with COVID-positive report suffer a significant burden of symptoms, and timely recognition of symptoms and their management can significantly reduce morbidity and mortality due to COVID-19.

3.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S90-S94, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792218

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Health-care professionals (HCPs) are the frontline warriors in the time of this uncertain and unpredictable crisis of COVID. They face many challenges while caring for these patients, yet they are expected to cope with it and deliver their duties for the betterment of humankind. Our primary aim was to identify and assess the concerns of HCPs working in COVID area in a tertiary institutional isolation center. METHODOLOGY: An online Google-based questionnaire survey was distributed through various social media platforms after approval of the institutional review board to a total of 100 HCPs who were treating and managing COVID-positive patients. RESULTS: Of 100 responses, 72% were concerned about the risk of infection to self and family, while 46% reported disruption of their daily activities at a personal level. At the institutional level, 17% were concerned about inadequate personal protective equipment-related challenges. 20% had inadequate knowledge and training about COVID. 16% of participants were anxious all the time, 11% feared all the time, and 12% had stress all the time while treating COVID patients. Connectedness and communication with family and friends, word of appreciation, music, and TV were few strategies to cope up with these challenges. CONCLUSION: There is a need to identify and address the concerns and challenges faced by HCPs and to develop a comprehensive strategy and guideline to provide a holistic care and to ensure their security in the workplace.

4.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S99-S105, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792216

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The World Health Organization has declared severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) as a pandemic. The interventions employed by various health authorities in combating the infection may help in eliminating the threat; however, they have long-term cognitive and mental health effects on the population. AIMS: The primary objective was to assess the prevalent concerns and coping strategies and perspectives in persons suspected of SARS-CoV-2 infection under institutional quarantine in India during the period from April 2020 to May 2020. SETTING AND DESIGN: Its a cross-sectional observational study conducted in the National Cancer Institute, Jhajjar, India. METHODOLOGY: After ethical clearance, convenience sampling was done. Relevant demographic details were obtained. Health-care professionally administered questionnaire to assess psychological concerns and coping mechanisms. All statistics are deemed to be descriptive only. RESULTS: The most common physical concern was fever seen in 37% of respondents, followed by cough in 31% and sore throat in 29%. In terms of emotional concerns, 55.3% of respondents were worried and 43% were anxious and 33% were sad. About 80.6% of participants selected support from family and friends helped them cope during the institutional quarantine. 57% maintained a daily routine, 70% selected praying, and 45% used music as a coping strategy. Only 2% felt that they were unable to cope. CONCLUSION: It highlights that the psychological impact of illness on affected individuals should not be overlooked as it may have the potential to cause major psychiatric morbidity. It also provides a crucial assessment of their coping mechanisms.

5.
Indian J Psychol Med ; 43(5): 428-435, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354667

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Year 2020 started with global health crisis known as COVID-19. In lack of established tools and management protocols, COVID-19 had become breeding ground for fear and confusion, leading to stigma toward affected individuals. METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted to estimate prevalence of stigma in discharged COVID-19 patients from a COVID hospital in India. Participants were approached telephonically using a semistructured questionnaire to record their experiences. Questions were asked regarding stigma at six major domains of daily life. Among total 1,673 discharged participants, 600 were conveniently selected and out of them 311 responded on telephonic interviews. RESULT: We found that 182 (58.52%) participants (95% CI: 53.04-64.00) have self-perceived stigma, 163 (52.41%) participants (95% CI: 46.86-57.96) experienced quarantine-related stigma, 222 (71.38%) participants (95% CI: 66.36-76.40) experienced neighborhood stigma, 214 (68.81%) participants (95% CI: 63.66-73.95) experienced stigma while going out in marketplaces, 180 (57.88%) participants (95% CI: 52.39-63.37) experienced stigma at their work place, and 207 (66.56%) participants (95% CI: 61.31-71.80) reported stigma experienced by their family members. With a total of 84.5% (95% CI: 80.06-88.39) participants experiencing stigma at some domain and about 42.8% of participants facing stigma at all six domains. The commonest noted cause of stigma was fear of getting infected, reported by 184 (59.2%) participants. CONCLUSION: This study shows high prevalence of stigma in COVID-19 patients suffering in their common domains of daily lives.

6.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S166-S167, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-707341

ABSTRACT

A 30-year-old transgender woman was admitted to the dedicated COVID hospital. She presented with mild symptoms and had various psychosocial insecurities, which remained unattended on reaching our health-care facility. From being left alone by her peers, lack of proper deliverance of information, and the stigma attached to the gender issues made her anxious and fearful. Although there are studies showing the prevalence of psychosocial burden in transgender people, a comprehensive approach led by a palliative care physician is yet to be initiated.

7.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S142-S144, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-707155

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has seen thousands of people all over the world placed under mass quarantine. Although quarantine is a successful public health measure, it has been described as an unpleasant experience. This case report presents the process of institutional quarantine of a 5-year-old boy along with his mother and explores the impact of it on their mental health. It provides an insight about the importance of increasing communication, doing collaborative exercises in addressing the concerns of children and alleviating their loneliness. It highlights the role of caregivers in aiding the recovery and providing essential psychosocial comfort to the affected children, making them an indispensable resource for the care team.

8.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S148-S149, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-707121

ABSTRACT

A 47-year-old patient was referred from otorhinolaryngologist with a chief complaint of hearing loss to the medical oncology department where he was diagnosed to have nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). The patient was given six cycles of chemotherapy and 35# of radiotherapy. After a week of therapies, he developed a low-grade fever. He was suspected of COVID-19, but the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction test came out to be negative. He developed urinary retention, and he was planned for suprapubic catheterization. Before the procedure, he was retested for COVID-19 which came out to be positive. This case report aims to describe the condition of a patient of NPC with COVID-19 infection and to discuss the outcome of disease in this circumstance.

9.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S170-S172, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-706811

ABSTRACT

The occurrence of the COVID-19 pandemic has caused big challenges in medical communities due to its unpredictable and uncertain nature. It leads to a great deal of physical and psychological concerns. It is more prone to patients with comorbidities such as hypertension and diabetes mellitus and also to immune-compromised patients such as cancer patients. Children are no exception. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common malignancy in the pediatric age group. In this case, we discuss the concerns and reflect the issues of a 10-year-old boy of ALL who was tested COVID positive during the evaluation and treatment of his disease and was admitted in a COVID isolation center along with his mother who was COVID negative.

10.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S150-S152, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-705918

ABSTRACT

A 26-year-old postpartum COVID-positive mother admitted in COVID isolation facility at a tertiary care center in India. Her primary physical concern was suture site pain and concerns related to expressed breast milk discarding. Her psychological concerns include distrust on COVID report, belief of unjust isolation, lack of family support, loneliness, feeling of not breast feeding her baby, fear, anxiety, anger, stress, and depression. She was concerned about the stigma anticipated for herself and her baby. Spiritually, she was concerned as she was not able to make harmony between herself and environment.

11.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S53-S55, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-705917

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 emerged as a unique type of health-care crisis. With no established protocols, it became a difficult task to manage this pandemic. Not only individual patients were the point of concern but also multiple clusters were getting reported. Management of these clusters has its own challenges varying from administrative and infrastructural to psychosocial- and stigma-related issues. A well-sought administrative will power along with a dedicated team of health care professionals handled the situation in their best capacity leaving an imprint of peace and harmony.

12.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S173-S175, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-705901

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 outbreak is an unexpected challenge to all areas of health-care delivery, including cancer centers. The novel coronavirus is known to affect individuals in all age groups, especially patients with multiple comorbidities. A nationwide lockdown has restricted the routine patient care, with health-care services focusing mainly on emergency services and COVID patient management. These restrictions in health services may delay the treatments of non-COVID patients. This conundrum is especially true in cancer patients as they require frequent visits to the hospital, and there is a lack of understanding of the treatment prioritization in cancer patients. In this case, we discuss the concerns faced by a 37-year-old male with neuroendocrine tumor of the anal canal who was tested COVID positive. His surgery was canceled following the report and was shifted to the COVID care facility. Best supportive care was given till further management.

13.
Indian J Palliat Care ; 26(Suppl 1): S168-S169, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-705496

ABSTRACT

The impact of COVID-19 on transplant recipients is yet to be fully understood. Apart from the physical implications, little has been discussed regarding the psychosocial burden it exerts on the already chronically ill patients. Here, we discuss a case of a 40-year-old male who received kidney transplantation 2 years ago and has tested positive for COVID-19. At the time of admission, he presented with mild symptoms and subsequently developed fever for which he had been managed conservatively. However, a comprehensive approach addressing psychosocial, emotional, and spiritual domains from a palliative care physician's perspective is often overlooked, whether in times of COVID-19 or not and this report aims to identify and assess such gaps.

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