Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 10 de 10
Filter
2.
Health Serv Manage Res ; : 9514848221115243, 2022 Jul 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1938177

ABSTRACT

The COVID crisis has put hospitals under great stress over the past 2 years and some institutions came close to their breaking points. This has often forced decision makers and the entire institutions to change their practices and the organization of the hospitals in order to continue operating despite limited resources. It has also led some hospitals to develop and implement organizational innovations. This article is based on a qualitative case study analyzing the case of a crisis unit that has implemented various innovative medical and organizational actions in order to manage the flow of resuscitation Covid patients in a large group of hospitals in Paris. This team has implemented a new evaluation scale of resuscitation needs in order to better manage quantitatively and qualitatively the patients' flow; it has defined medical criteria to select the patients eligible for transfer; it has organized one hundred patients transfers to other hospitals' intensive care units, in and out of the region, involving private hospitals and private ambulances for a new collaboration. The case allows us to understand innovation in the midst of an extreme situation, when material and human resources are highly constrained, and with very strong time pressure. We highlight the importance of implementing flexible organizational processes and staffing the crisis team with physicians and nurses with specific and complementary skills and experience in flow management and crisis situations.

3.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 22(1): 46, 2022 02 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690973

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are limited data to detail the perioperative anesthetic management and the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications among patients requiring an anesthetic procedure while being SARS-CoV-2 positive or suspected. METHODS: An observational multicenter cohort study was performed including consecutive patients who were SARS-CoV-2 confirmed or suspected and who underwent scheduled and emergency anesthesia between March 17 and May 26, 2020. RESULTS: A total of 187 patients underwent anesthesia with SARS-CoV-2 confirmed or suspected, with ultimately 135 (72.2%) patients positive and 52 (27.8%) negative. The median SOFA score was 2 [0; 5], and the median ARISCAT score was 49 [36; 67]. The major respiratory complications rate was 48.7% (n = 91) with 40.4% (n = 21) and 51.9% (n = 70) in the SARS-CoV-2-negative and -positive groups, respectively (p = 0.21). Among both positive and negative groups, patients with a high ARISCAT risk score (> 44) had a higher risk of presenting major respiratory complications (p < 0.01 and p = 0.1, respectively). DISCUSSION: When comparing SARS-COV-2-positive and -negative patients, no significant difference was found regarding the rate of postoperative complications, while baseline characteristics strongly impact these outcomes. This finding suggests that patients should be scheduled for anesthetic procedures based on their overall risk of postoperative complication, and not just based on their SARS-CoV-2 status.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia , COVID-19/complications , Aged , Anesthesia/adverse effects , Cohort Studies , Elective Surgical Procedures , Emergency Medical Services , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Perioperative Care , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Registries , Respiratory Tract Diseases/complications , Respiratory Tract Diseases/epidemiology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
4.
Médecine de Catastrophe - Urgences Collectives ; 2021.
Article in French | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1401802

ABSTRACT

Résumé La pandémie COVID-19 a inscrit l’hôpital au cœur d’une crise sanitaire de cinétique longue. Un des enjeux majeurs est d’éviter la saturation du système, notamment l’accessibilité à la réanimation. À la demande de la cellule de crise du groupe hospitalier AP-HP Sorbonne Université, une cellule spécifique nommée « Dynamo » s’est montée au cours de la 1ère vague et a apporté des solutions innovantes pour libérer des places en réanimation. La cellule avec l’accord du directeur médical de crise, a ouvert un flux entre les réanimations expertes et des unités nouvelles de réanimation. Initialement la cellule « Dynamo » a géré complètement les transferts des réanimations demandeuses vers les sites d’accueil en Ile-de-France en médicalisant et armant des ambulances privées avec les moyens humains et matériels d’AP-HP Sorbonne Université. Dans un second temps, la cellule s’est mise à disposition du SAMU zonal afin de trouver des patients éligibles aux transferts inter-régionaux (train, avion, hélicoptère). Au cours de la 1ère vague, « Dynamo » a reçu 149 demandes de transferts des réanimations de AP-HP Sorbonne Université entre le 27 mars et le 20 avril 2020. 105 demandes ont été honorées, dont 91 de manière totalement autonome. Concernant les transferts en autonomie les équipes médicales étaient composées d’un MIR (médecin intensif réanimateur), d’un MAR (médecin anesthésiste-réanimateur) ou d’un réanimateur pédiatrique associé à un aide le plus souvent chirurgien. Le matériel de transport était fourni par la réanimation de départ. L’équipe constituée était accompagnée de deux ambulanciers privés. La cellule « Dynamo » a été réactivée pour la 3ème vague. La typologie de patients modifiés, une épidémie différente dans ses caractéristiques et décisions politiques, le choix des proches n’ont pas permis de montrer autant d’efficacité. At the request of the crisis unit of the AP-HP Sorbonne University hospital group, the “Dynamo” team, during the 1st wave, provided innovative solutions to free up places in intensive care. “Dynamo” team, with the agreement of the crisis medical director, opened a flow between expert resuscitations and new intensive care units. Initially, “Dynamo” team completely managed the transfers by medicalizing and arming private ambulances with the human and material resources of AP-HP Sorbonne University. Secondly, “Dynamo” team made itself available to the zonal SAMU in order to find patients eligible for inter-regional transfers (train, plane, helicopter). During the 1st wave, “Dynamo” team received 149 requests for transfers from AP-HP Sorbonne University between March 27 and April 20, 2020. 105 requests were honored, 91 of which were completely autonomous. Regarding autonomous transfers, the medical teams consisted of medical intensivist, or an anesthesiologist and intensivist or a pediatric intensivist associated with an assistant, most often a surgeon. The transport equipment was provided by the initial intensive care uni.t The team formed was accompanied by two private paramedics. “Dynamo” team has been reactivated for the 3rd wave. The changed typology of patients, a different epidemic in its characteristics and political decisions, the choice of relatives did not allow “Dynamo” team to be as effective.

5.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(3): e211489, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1130417

ABSTRACT

Importance: There is evidence of central nervous system impairments associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection, including encephalopathy. Multimodal monitoring of patients with COVID-19 may delineate the specific features of COVID-19-related encephalopathy and guide clinical management. Objectives: To investigate clinical, biological, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in association with electroencephalographic (EEG) features for patients with COVID-19, and to better refine the features of COVID-19-related encephalopathy. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study conducted in Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, Paris, France, enrolled 78 hospitalized adults who received a diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov2) and underwent EEG between March 30 and June 11, 2020. Exposures: Detection of SARS-CoV-2 from a nasopharyngeal specimen using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay or, in the case of associated pneumonia, on a computed tomography scan of the chest. Main Outcomes and Measures: Data on the clinical and paraclinical features of the 78 patients with COVID-19 were retrieved from electronic patient records. Results: Of 644 patients who were hospitalized for COVID-19, 78 (57 men [73%]; mean [SD] age, 61 [12] years) underwent EEG. The main indications for EEG were delirium, seizure-like events, and delayed awakening in the intensive care unit after stopping treatment with sedatives. Sixty-nine patients showed pathologic EEG findings, including metabolic-toxic encephalopathy features, frontal abnormalities, periodic discharges, and epileptic activities. Of 57 patients who underwent brain MRI, 41 showed abnormalities, including perfusion abnormalities, acute ischemic lesions, multiple microhemorrhages, and white matter-enhancing lesions. Fifty-five patients showed biological abnormalities, including dysnatremia, kidney failure, and liver dysfunction, the same day as the EEG. The results of cerebrospinal fluid analysis were negative for SARS-Cov-2 for all tested patients. Nine patients who had no identifiable cause of brain injury outside COVID-19 were further isolated; their brain injury was defined as COVID-19-related encephalopathy. They represented 1% (9 of 644) of patients with COVID-19 requiring hospitalization. Six of these 9 patients had movement disorders, 7 had frontal syndrome, 4 had brainstem impairment, 4 had periodic EEG discharges, and 3 had MRI white matter-enhancing lesions. Conclusions and Relevance: The results from this cohort of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 suggest there are clinical, EEG, and MRI patterns that could delineate specific COVID-19-related encephalopathy and guide treatment strategy.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Cohort Studies , Electroencephalography , Electronic Health Records , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged
6.
Radiology ; 297(3): E313-E323, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-930394

ABSTRACT

Background This study provides a detailed imaging assessment in a large series of patients infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and presenting with neurologic manifestations. Purpose To review the MRI findings associated with acute neurologic manifestations in patients with COVID-19. Materials and Methods This was a cross-sectional study conducted between March 23 and May 7, 2020, at the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital, a reference center for COVID-19 in the Paris area. Adult patients were included if they had a diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection with acute neurologic manifestations and referral for brain MRI. Patients with a prior history of neurologic disease were excluded. The characteristics and frequency of different MRI features were investigated. The findings were analyzed separately in patients in intensive care units (ICUs) and other departments (non-ICU). Results During the inclusion period, 1176 patients suspected of having COVID-19 were hospitalized. Of 308 patients with acute neurologic symptoms, 73 met the inclusion criteria and were included (23.7%): thirty-five patients were in the ICU (47.9%) and 38 were not (52.1%). The mean age was 58.5 years ± 15.6 [standard deviation], with a male predominance (65.8% vs 34.2%). Forty-three patients had abnormal MRI findings 2-4 weeks after symptom onset (58.9%), including 17 with acute ischemic infarct (23.3%), one with a deep venous thrombosis (1.4%), eight with multiple microhemorrhages (11.3%), 22 with perfusion abnormalities (47.7%), and three with restricted diffusion foci within the corpus callosum consistent with cytotoxic lesions of the corpus callosum (4.1%). Multifocal white matter-enhancing lesions were seen in four patients in the ICU (5%). Basal ganglia abnormalities were seen in four other patients (5%). Cerebrospinal fluid analyses were negative for SARS-CoV-2 in all patients tested (n = 39). Conclusion In addition to cerebrovascular lesions, perfusion abnormalities, cytotoxic lesions of the corpus callosum, and intensive care unit-related complications, we identified two patterns including white matter-enhancing lesions and basal ganglia abnormalities that could be related to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. © RSNA, 2020 Online supplemental material is available for this article.


Subject(s)
Brain/diagnostic imaging , Cerebrovascular Disorders/complications , Cerebrovascular Disorders/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Acute Disease , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Brain/physiopathology , COVID-19 , Cerebrovascular Disorders/physiopathology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Crit Care ; 24(1): 418, 2020 07 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-638653

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) outbreak is spreading worldwide. To date, no specific treatment has convincingly demonstrated its efficacy. Hydroxychloroquine and lopinavir/ritonavir have potential interest, but virological and clinical data are scarce, especially in critically ill patients. METHODS: The present report took the opportunity of compassionate use and successive drug shortages to compare the effects of two therapeutic options, lopinavir/ritonavir and hydroxychloroquine, as compared to standard of care only. The primary outcomes were treatment escalation (intubation, extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation support, or renal replacement therapy) after day 1 until day 28. Secondary outcomes included ventilator-free days at day 28, mortality at day 14 and day 28, treatment safety issues and changes in respiratory tracts, and plasma viral load (as estimated by cycle threshold value) between admission and day 7. RESULTS: Eighty patients were treated during a 4-week period and included in the analysis: 22 (28%) received standard of care only, 20 (25%) patients received lopinavir/ritonavir associated to standard of care, and 38 (47%) patients received hydroxychloroquine and standard of care. Baseline characteristics were well balanced between the 3 groups. Treatment escalation occurred in 9 (41%), 10 (50%), and 15 (39%) patients who received standard of care only, standard of care and lopinavir/ritonavir, and standard of care and hydroxychloroquine, respectively (p = 0.567). There was no significant difference between groups regarding the number of ventilator-free days at day 28 and mortality at day 14 and day 28. Finally, there was no significant change between groups in viral respiratory or plasma load between admission and day 7. CONCLUSION: In critically ill patients admitted for SARS-CoV-2-related pneumonia, no difference was found between hydroxychloroquine or lopinavir/ritonavir as compared to standard of care only on the proportion of patients who needed treatment escalation at day 28. Further randomized controlled trials are required to demonstrate whether these drugs may be useful in this context.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , Aged , COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Drug Combinations , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Standard of Care , Treatment Outcome
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL