Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Journal of the Association of Physicians of India ; 69(October):17-23, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1717366

ABSTRACT

Background: There is more than twofold rise in prevalence of mucormycosis cases in India during the COVID-19 pandemic which needs to be evaluated. Aims: The study aimed to document the spectrum of cases of mucormycosis seen at our Institute during COVID-19 times.

2.
QJM ; 115(4): 222-227, 2022 Apr 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706110

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE) is one of the most common infectious causes of sporadic encephalitis. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has been associated with immune dysregulation of the host that might increase the risk of infections like HSVE following SARS-CoV-2 infection. There is paucity of literature on post COVID-19 HSVE. This study was conducted with the aim of analyzing the clinical presentation, brain imaging, and outcome of patients presenting with HSVE within 6 weeks of COVID-19 and providing a comprehensive review on the possible mechanisms of post-COVID-19 HSVE. METHODS: This observational study included patients who had laboratory-confirmed HSVE (type 1 or type 2) and a history of COVID-19 within the previous 6 weeks. Patients were followed up for 3 months. RESULTS: Eight patients were included and all of them had type 1 HSVE. The mean latency of onset of neurological symptoms from being diagnosed with COVID-19 is 23.87 days and a majority of the patients have received injectable steroids with a mean duration of 6.5 days. Behavioral abnormality was the commonest neurological presentation and typical brain imaging involved T2 FLAIR hyperintensities of the medial temporal lobes. All patients received intravenous acyclovir 10 mg/kg every eight hourly for atleast 14 days. One patient with concomitant rhinocerebral mucormycosis succumbed while the majority had a complete recovery. CONCLUSION: Possible immune dysregulation in COVID-19 may increase the susceptibility of HSVE in patients with a history of recent SARS-CoV-2 infection. The clinical manifestations and laboratory findings of HSVE in such patients are similar to typical HSVE.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Encephalitis, Herpes Simplex , Herpes Simplex , Acyclovir/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Encephalitis, Herpes Simplex/complications , Encephalitis, Herpes Simplex/diagnosis , Encephalitis, Herpes Simplex/drug therapy , Humans , Observational Studies as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Neurology Asia ; 26(4):829-834, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1626971

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 infection is well-known to produce different neurological complications, including cerebrovascular diseases. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome (RCVS) is characterized by transient segmental vasoconstriction of the cerebral vasculature, has been rarely reported in association with COVID-19 infection. The causative agent, the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), binds to the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE-2) receptors for its entry into the host cell. This leads to downregulation of the ACE-2 and increased activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAAS) axis resulting in sympathetic overactivity and vasoconstriction. This might be the possible mechanism of RCVS in COVID-19. We hereby report a case of RCVS occurring in a SARS-CoV-2infected patient. This was a 38-year-old male without any comorbidities or risk factors, who presented with headache and confusion. His SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR was positive. MRI of the brain was normal but cerebral angiography revealed segmental vasoconstriction in bilateral middle cerebral arteries and the terminal part of the internal carotid arteries, which resolved almost completely after 2 weeks. He was treated with oral nimodipine 60 mg every 6 hourly. A database search revealed 2 previous cases of RCVS associated with COVID-19. In conclusion, RCVS is a rare complication of COVID-19. It is possibly under-recognized as only a few COVID-19 patients with headaches undergo cerebral angiography especially when parenchymal brain imaging is normal.

4.
Journal of Association of Physicians of India ; 69(10):17-23, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1469268

ABSTRACT

Background: There is more than twofold rise in prevalence of mucormycosis cases in India during the COVID-19 pandemic which needs to be evaluated. Aims: The study aimed to document the spectrum of cases of mucormycosis seen at our Institute during COVID-19 times. Methods: The study is a retrospective observational study carried out at our Institute from May 2021 to mid-June 2021. All patients with biopsy-proven mucormycosis were enrolled in the study. The patients were subjected to complete history taking, ophthalmological examination, and imaging studies. The patients were treated with a multidisciplinary approach with antifungal therapy as well as surgical intervention when needed. Results: Ten patients (n=10) were seen, with a mean age of 50.3 years. The major risk factors included recent use of steroids, uncontrolled diabetes, and CKD. The most common presentation was swelling of unilateral eye and ptosis, followed by loss of vision. Inflammatory marker (CRP) and d-dimer were raised at presentation in all cases. Imaging showed the spread of infection from paranasal sinus to orbit and brain via cavernous sinus, which was a poor prognostic factor. Intravenous Amphotericin-B was given to all patients for at least 4 weeks. Two patients were discharged after completion of treatment and mortality was seen in three patients. Conclusion: We present an array of COVID-associated-mucormycosis (CAM) cases from Eastern India. CAM is presenting with rhino-orbito-cerebral involvement. There is poor outcome with cerebral involvement and high incidence of adverse effects with deoxycholate formulation of amphotericin-B. The causal association of COVID-19 with mucormycosis needs to be unearthed but possible preventive role of anticoagulation should be evaluated. © 2021 Journal of Association of Physicians of India. All rights reserved.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL