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1.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 16(8):608-613, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2081634

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has become a global pandemic which has affected millions of people worldwide. It has become a global issue for the people of the world. The current study aimed to find whether there is any relationship between spirituality, Occupational stress and work family conflict among COVID-19 rescue responders or not. A sample of 180 COVID-19 rescue responders was selected through purposive sampling by selecting 5 rescue responders from each district of Punjab Province. Co relational research design used for this study and Data was collected by administering Health Safety Executive Standard Indicator Tool for occupational stress, Work Family Conflict Self Efficacy scale for work family conflict and Multidimensional Measure for Islamic Spirituality to rescue responders. Data was analyzed though SPSS by using statistical processes of regression, correlation and moderation along with calculating Percentage and frequencies of responses. Results of the study showed that spirituality moderates the relationship between occupational stress and work family conflict among COVID-19 rescue responders. It also showed that there was no significant effect of demographic variables on occupational stress, work family conflict and spirituality. This study is the first study on COVID-19 rescue responders. More research work may be done by other researchers to fully explore different aspects of spirituality, occupational stress and work family conflict among Rescue responders and emergency responders. Copyright © 2022 Lahore Medical And Dental College. All rights reserved.

2.
European Journal of Clinical Pharmacy ; 23(4):244-248, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1955738

ABSTRACT

Background:As the pandemic progresses, we are growing increasingly aware that COVID-19 affects multiple parts of the body beyond the lungs. Objective: We aimed to review the literature to outline the COVID-19 effect on hair, vision, thinking, hearing, fertility, taste and smell, skin and gastro-intestine (GI), and its health crisis among COVID-19 infected patients.Method: We searched the database «PubMed» which included studies that measured COVID-19 effect on hair, vision, thinking, hearing, fertility, taste and smell, skin, and GI. Results: A total of 60 studies were reviewed and screened based on titles and s. Of these, only 15 studies were determined to meet the eligibility criteria for discussion. The health crisis associated with hair, vision, thinking, hearing, fertility, taste and smell, skin, and GI were baldness, hair shedding, conjunctivitis, pink-eye syndrome, sore-eyes, brain fog, short-term memory loss, reduction in male sperm concentration, altered sperm cell shape, morbidity, tinnitus, loss of hearing, reduce taste and loss of smell, acne, eczema, psoriasis, and rosacea, lacy and dusky rashes on the skin, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting diarrhea, and abdomen pain. Conclusion: Scientists, researchers and clinicians are still learning, observing and knowledge is evolving daily related to COVID-19 infection.

3.
JOURNAL OF THE LIAQUAT UNIVERSITY OF MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES ; 21(2):149-152, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1939582

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare the pre and post-vaccination effects of vaccination on various COVID SOPs and to determine whether or not HCWs take adequate precautions. METHODOLOGY: This cross-sectional study was conducted between May and July 2021. Online survey forms were distributed via social media platforms, completed by male and female house officers, medical officers, postgraduate trainees, residents, and specialists/consultants at Holy Family Hospital in RESULTS: Our study enrolled 104 volunteers. The participants ranged in age from 18 to 30 years, and males constituted more than half of the study population. The most frequently used designation was postgraduate trainees/residents, which accounted for 34% of all participants. 100% of medical professionals used masks before vaccination, and 45% of medical professionals practiced social distancing. Fourteen of the participants discontinued the use of masks following vaccination. Hand washing and sanitizing habits decreased by 14. CONCLUSION: Vaccination has made life easy for HCWs, as negative trends are observed towards preventive measures. The pandemic timeline and physical and mental well-being depreciation also played a crucial role in the COVID-19 SOPs. So let us all hope that the whole population gets vaccinated and the virus gets eradicated.

4.
CUREUS JOURNAL OF MEDICAL SCIENCE ; 14(6), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1939383

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome management secondary to coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has been overwhelming for healthcare systems. Patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection can present with symptoms ranging from a mild flu-like illness to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Patients who develop coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection and present with hypoxic respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation typically follow ARDS physiology. Many of them develop complications including pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and pneumopericardium. In this case series, we present multiple instances where patients with severe COVID-19 infections developed tension pneumothoraces during their hospital course.

5.
Stud Mycol ; 101: 417-564, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1902874

ABSTRACT

This paper is the fourth contribution in the Genera of Phytopathogenic Fungi (GOPHY) series. The series provides morphological descriptions and information about the pathology, distribution, hosts and disease symptoms, as well as DNA barcodes for the taxa covered. Moreover, 12 whole-genome sequences for the type or new species in the treated genera are provided. The fourth paper in the GOPHY series covers 19 genera of phytopathogenic fungi and their relatives, including Ascochyta, Cadophora, Celoporthe, Cercospora, Coleophoma, Cytospora, Dendrostoma, Didymella, Endothia, Heterophaeomoniella, Leptosphaerulina, Melampsora, Nigrospora, Pezicula, Phaeomoniella, Pseudocercospora, Pteridopassalora, Zymoseptoria, and one genus of oomycetes, Phytophthora. This study includes two new genera, 30 new species, five new combinations, and 43 typifications of older names. Taxonomic novelties: New genera: Heterophaeomoniella L. Mostert, C.F.J. Spies, Halleen & Gramaje, Pteridopassalora C. Nakash. & Crous; New species: Ascochyta flava Qian Chen & L. Cai, Cadophora domestica L. Mostert, R. van der Merwe, Halleen & Gramaje, Cadophora rotunda L. Mostert, R. van der Merwe, Halleen & Gramaje, Cadophora vinacea J.R. Úrbez-Torres, D.T. O'Gorman & Gramaje, Cadophora vivarii L. Mostert, Havenga, Halleen & Gramaje, Celoporthe foliorum H. Suzuki, Marinc. & M.J. Wingf., Cercospora alyssopsidis M. Bakhshi, Zare & Crous, Dendrostoma elaeocarpi C.M. Tian & Q. Yang, Didymella chlamydospora Qian Chen & L. Cai, Didymella gei Qian Chen & L. Cai, Didymella ligulariae Qian Chen & L. Cai, Didymella qilianensis Qian Chen & L. Cai, Didymella uniseptata Qian Chen & L. Cai, Endothia cerciana W. Wang. & S.F. Chen, Leptosphaerulina miscanthi Qian Chen & L. Cai, Nigrospora covidalis M. Raza, Qian Chen & L. Cai, Nigrospora globospora M. Raza, Qian Chen & L. Cai, Nigrospora philosophiae-doctoris M. Raza, Qian Chen & L. Cai, Phytophthora transitoria I. Milenkovic, T. Májek & T. Jung, Phytophthora panamensis T. Jung, Y. Balci, K. Broders & I. Milenkovic, Phytophthora variabilis T. Jung, M. Horta Jung & I. Milenkovic, Pseudocercospora delonicicola C. Nakash., L. Suhaizan & I. Nurul Faziha, Pseudocercospora farfugii C. Nakash., I. Araki, & Ai Ito, Pseudocercospora hardenbergiae Crous & C. Nakash., Pseudocercospora kenyirana C. Nakash., L. Suhaizan & I. Nurul Faziha, Pseudocercospora perrottetiae Crous, C. Nakash. & C.Y. Chen, Pseudocercospora platyceriicola C. Nakash., Y. Hatt, L. Suhaizan & I. Nurul Faziha, Pseudocercospora stemonicola C. Nakash., Y. Hatt., L. Suhaizan & I. Nurul Faziha, Pseudocercospora terengganuensis C. Nakash., Y. Hatt., L. Suhaizan & I. Nurul Faziha, Pseudocercospora xenopunicae Crous & C. Nakash.; New combinations: Heterophaeomoniella pinifoliorum (Hyang B. Lee et al.) L. Mostert, C.F.J. Spies, Halleen & Gramaje, Pseudocercospora pruni-grayanae (Sawada) C. Nakash. & Motohashi., Pseudocercospora togashiana (K. Ito & Tak. Kobay.) C. Nakash. & Tak. Kobay., Pteridopassalora nephrolepidicola (Crous & R.G. Shivas) C. Nakash. & Crous, Pteridopassalora lygodii (Goh & W.H. Hsieh) C. Nakash. & Crous; Typification: Epitypification: Botrytis infestans Mont., Cercospora abeliae Katsuki, Cercospora ceratoniae Pat. & Trab., Cercospora cladrastidis Jacz., Cercospora cryptomeriicola Sawada, Cercospora dalbergiae S.H. Sun, Cercospora ebulicola W. Yamam., Cercospora formosana W. Yamam., Cercospora fukuii W. Yamam., Cercospora glochidionis Sawada, Cercospora ixorana J.M. Yen & Lim, Cercospora liquidambaricola J.M. Yen, Cercospora pancratii Ellis & Everh., Cercospora pini-densiflorae Hori & Nambu, Cercospora profusa Syd. & P. Syd., Cercospora pyracanthae Katsuki, Cercospora horiana Togashi & Katsuki, Cercospora tabernaemontanae Syd. & P. Syd., Cercospora trinidadensis F. Stevens & Solheim, Melampsora laricis-urbanianae Tak. Matsumoto, Melampsora salicis-cupularis Wang, Phaeoisariopsis pruni-grayanae Sawada, Pseudocercospora angiopteridis Goh & W.H. Hsieh, Pseudocercospora basitruncata Crous, Pseudocercospora boehmeriigena U. Braun, Pseudocercospora coprosmae U. Braun & C.F. Hill, Pseudocercospora cratevicola C. Nakash. & U. Braun, Pseudocercospora cymbidiicola U. Braun & C.F. Hill, Pseudocercospora dodonaeae Boesew., Pseudocercospora euphorbiacearum U. Braun, Pseudocercospora lygodii Goh & W.H. Hsieh, Pseudocercospora metrosideri U. Braun, Pseudocercospora paraexosporioides C. Nakash. & U. Braun, Pseudocercospora symploci Katsuki & Tak. Kobay. ex U. Braun & Crous, Septogloeum punctatum Wakef.; Neotypification: Cercospora aleuritis I. Miyake; Lectotypification: Cercospora dalbergiae S.H. Sun, Cercospora formosana W. Yamam., Cercospora fukuii W. Yamam., Cercospora glochidionis Sawada, Cercospora profusa Syd. & P. Syd., Melampsora laricis-urbanianae Tak. Matsumoto, Phaeoisariopsis pruni-grayanae Sawada, Pseudocercospora symploci Katsuki & Tak. Kobay. ex U. Braun & Crous. Citation: Chen Q, Bakhshi M, Balci Y, Broders KD, Cheewangkoon R, Chen SF, Fan XL, Gramaje D, Halleen F, Horta Jung M, Jiang N, Jung T, Májek T, Marincowitz S, Milenkovic T, Mostert L, Nakashima C, Nurul Faziha I, Pan M, Raza M, Scanu B, Spies CFJ, Suhaizan L, Suzuki H, Tian CM, Tomsovský M, Úrbez-Torres JR, Wang W, Wingfield BD, Wingfield MJ, Yang Q, Yang X, Zare R, Zhao P, Groenewald JZ, Cai L, Crous PW (2022). Genera of phytopathogenic fungi: GOPHY 4. Studies in Mycology 101: 417-564. doi: 10.3114/sim.2022.101.06.

6.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 16(5):426-428, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1897400

ABSTRACT

Background: The education of college level badly affected by the Covid-19 because of several reasons. The educational activities of college level are neglected and the education system is becoming unsatisfactory during the deteriorated era of Covid-19. Objectives: The aim of study is to identify the impact of Covid-19 on the academic achievement of student of district Faisalabad. Methodology: Total population will be 267 students of graduation 4th year in the colleges of (Government College for women Karkhana bazar Faisalabad 101, Government Degree College Samanabad 77 and Government postgraduate Islamiya College for women Eidgah road Faisalabad 89). The sample size of this study was 134 (Government college for women karkhana bazar Faisalabad 54, Government degree college Samanabad 38 and Government postgraduate Islamiya college for women Eidgah road Faisalabad 42) by the confidence interval 6% and confidence level 95%.The sample size had been determined by using online available software i.e;www.surveysystem.com. Respondents were selected for research by simple random sampling technique. The data were collected through questionnaire keeping in view the objectives of the study. Collected data were analyzed by using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). The respondents of the present study were asked to give their opinion on a five Likert scale. The percentage, mean, standard deviation and rank order were calculated for presents the results. Conclusion: The study was concluded that students were faced numerous social problems due to the spreading of Covid-19 in all over the world. These social problems directly affected the educational system of every country. On the basis of results, it was concluded that the Covid-19 completely deteriorated the educational system and academic achievements of students. So it becomes crucial to reconstruct every fiber of educational society so that development of student’s academic achievement can be enhanced.

7.
1st International Conference on Technologies for Smart Green Connected Society 2021, ICTSGS 2021 ; 107:11559-11565, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1874845

ABSTRACT

India being worst hit during the second wave of Coronavirus left a devastating effect on lives and economy. India is facing the greatest crisis since its independence and people are feeling unsecured because of this deadly virus. Lockdown and social distancing have changed not only the consumer buying habits but also the shopping preferences. As coronavirus progressed the consumer optimism declined in India and Consumers are worried about personal and family safety. Majority of people are trying to do their work from home and stepping out only to buy the essential goods. This crisis has affected brand, category preferences, buying behaviour and spends. As purchase decision people are spending higher on their health and hygiene products and preferring home deliveries rather than visiting stores. People have adopted low touch activities which has increased digital payments and online transaction. This paper attempts to examine the impact of coronavirus on consumer behaviour. © The Electrochemical Society

8.
Organizatsionnaya Psikologiya ; 12(1):27-42, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1870181

ABSTRACT

Purpose. In organizations, employee's work stress is seen as the main problem behind dissatisfaction which ultimately leads towards turnover intention. This research is specific to knowledge workers of private schools registered in the Federal Capital Territory of Pakistan during COVID-19 and empirically examined the influence of perceived work stress on turnover intention and work satisfaction, including investigating the mediation effect of work satisfaction on the association of perceived work stress with turnover intention. Finally, the conditional direct and indirect effect of males and females is also measured. Design. Data were gathered from private school's teachers of the Federal Capital Territory of Pakistan in the form of a survey and the final sample of 269 teachers was used to test the hypotheses through structural equational modeling. Findings. Perceived work stress positively influenced the turnover intention of knowledge workers but work satisfaction reduces the greater impact of stress on turnover intention and seems to he partially mediated the association of perceived work stress and turnover intention. Finally, gender differences exposed that work satisfaction decreases the greater effect of stress on turnover intention among females strongly than males although the direct effect was already weaker among male teachers than females. Practical implications. This research will assist decision-makers to better understand the consequences of perceived work stress and work satisfaction. Moreover, management can formulate strategies for the retention of employees to minimize the turnover of knowledge workers that are contributing to the welfare of society. Organizations need to emphasize the work satisfaction of employees on priority in any circumstances to utilize their full efforts for better performance as the turnover intention is the main cause of perceived work stress. Work satisfaction minimizes the influence of perceived work stress on turnover intention among knowledge workers especially in the current scenario where almost every organization is affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and official work has been transmitted from physical to online medium which is generating uncertainties globally. Value of results. This research paper thrusts the knowledge about the antecedents of individual's work satisfaction, stress and intention to quit in the field of education.

9.
Digital Health: Exploring Use and Integration of Wearables ; : 151-162, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1838466

ABSTRACT

The healthcare sector has been stretched to its maximum capacity with the outbreak of coronavirus. With a worldwide impact it has highlighted the maximum capabilities and limitations in the existing healthcare facilities worldwide. Such an unprecedented load of healthcare requirements can be supported with Internet of Things (IoT) and cloud services. The limited number of healthcare staff and limited resources urge the use of emerging technologies to support healthcare provision. In such circumstance IoT and cloud computing offer sufficient potential that can be used for monitoring, diagnosis, support, and intelligent decisioning. A smart environment can be created with the collected data from patients, medical equipment, hospitals, ambulances, recovery centers, old-age houses, and nursing homes. The use of cloud services integrated with IoT allows the collection, analysis, and provisioning of support and solution at a rapid rate. This facilitates remote patient-monitoring and safeguards healthcare providers from coming in direct contact with the patient and highly infectious and contagious work environment. It also brings in great potentials for smart-health solutions with enhanced patient observation, monitoring, support, and prediction of vital needs essential in emergency situations. © 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

10.
Journal of the Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences ; 21(1):44-49, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1818978

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on health care workers in tertiary care hospitals of Karachi. METHODOLOGY: This is a multicentric cross-sectional study conducted at tertiary care hospitals of Karachi (Pakistan). A total of 350 health care workers, including both males and females, from different private and Government tertiary care hospitals, were approached and enrolled after fulfilling the selection criteria from May to Aug 2020. The semi-structured Performa was used for demographic details while the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD 7) were administered to evaluate depression and anxiety, respectively. RESULTS: Out of 350 participants, 220 (62.8%) have depression in this study, while 206 (58.8%) have anxiety. The degree of depression was mild in 81 (23.1%) of health care workers, moderate in59 (16.8%), moderately severe in 50 (14.2%), severe in 30 (8.6%). Similarly, mild anxiety was present in 75 (21.4%), moderate in 74 (21.1%), and severe anxiety in 57 (16.3%) persons. The most common problem they faced is ―Fear of transmission of disease family /close friends, being present in 311 (88.9%) p-value = 0.014. CONCLUSION: It is evident that health care workers are affected with depression and anxiety due to pandemic. It is necessary to take appropriate steps to manage the psychological impact of the stress to be more productive in their respective fields.

11.
Journal of Population and Social Studies ; 30:408-422, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1744422

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic during initial lockdowns created a problematic situation in which individuals were forced to remain within their homes and were forced to follow social distance restrictions for the well-being of themselves and others. In response, people use social networking sites on mobile phones to gather information about the COVID-19 epidemic. This study aims to investigate the influence of lockdowns on mobile phone usage among university students. Moreover, the harmful effects of COVID-19, such as anxiety, social isolation, and nomophobia among national and international students, are also investigated. The total sample size for this cross-sectional study is 438 individuals. The sample consists of Pakistani students studying at local universities (58.7%) and Pakistani students studying abroad (41.3%). The indigenous data is gathered through convenience sampling. The snowball sampling approach is adopted to acquire data from overseas. The findings show that the excessive use of mobile phones for browsing social networking sites to get information about the pandemic caused COVID-19 anxiety, nomophobia (“no-mobile-phone” phobia), and feelings of social isolation. Our results indicate that the COVID-19 outbreak greatly impacted students' massive mobile phone use and psycho-social well-being, regardless of their geographic location. © 2022. All Rights Reserved.

12.
Pakistan Armed Forces Medical Journal ; 71:S500-S503, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1732703

ABSTRACT

Objective: To determine the frequency of earliest symptoms of COVID-19 infection among patients with confirmed SARS-COVID-19 infection. Study Design: Cross-sectional analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital Multan, from Jun to Dec 2021. Methodology: Data from 299 patients admitted in tertiary care settings was collected on a questionnaire. Patients regardless of gender and age who had confirmed COVID-19 infection through Real Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) were included in the study. A nonprobability consecutive sampling technique was used to select samples. Data was entered and analyzed through SPSS version 22. Frequencies and percentages of various presenting symptoms were calculated. Sample size calculated at 95% level of confidence, 1% required precision, and 27% anticipated population proportion were 299. The over-all difference in frequencies of symptoms in various groups was compared by using chi-square test. p-value <0.05 was taken as significant. Results: A total of 299 participants were included in this analysis. The median age for participants (interquartile range [IQR]) was 46 (36-54) years. Among 299 adults the reported symptoms were cough 238 (79.6%), fever 176 (58.7%) and, dyspnea 113 (37.8%). Only 78 (26.1%) of participants with confirmed infection reported having all three symptoms of cough, fever, and dyspnea. Other reported symptoms in patients were diarrhea 54 (18.1%), fatigue 128 (42.8%), myalgia 113 (37.8%), and anosmia 98 (32.8%). There was no significant difference in the frequency of symptoms across both genders. Conclusion: The most frequent symptoms of COVID-19 are cough, fever, and dyspnea. © 2021, Army Medical College. All rights reserved.

13.
Pakistan Armed Forces Medical Journal ; 71:S530-S533, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1732702

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore the disappearance of neutralizing antibodies from patients, their myths, and facts. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital Multan Pakistan, from Jul 2021 to Aug 2021. Methodology: A total of 100 blood samples were collected from 100 COVID-19 patients. These 100 patients were followed up for a period of 3 months. Antibodies were determined with the modified neutralization assay method and enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). Results: The antibody level by NA and ELISA peaked on days 30-35 then decreased slightly. In multivariate analysis, patients aged 25-35, 36-56, and 57-84 years had a higher neutralizing antibody level than those aged 10-21 years. The patient with the worst clinical manifestation had a higher neutralizing antibody titer. In serum samples, IgG was undetectable at 18.3% and 11% and the geographical mean reciprocal titers dropped from 244 at 3-month period and neutralizing antibodies, the geographical mean reciprocal titers dropped from 874 at 3 months. Conclusion: All COVID-19 patients were seropositive and significantly neutralizing antibody response. Neutralizing antibody levels depend on the time after the onset of symptoms, age, and severity of the disease. © 2021, Army Medical College. All rights reserved.

14.
Journal for Multicultural Education ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1701947

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This paper aims to report insights from the planning and execution phase of an interactive radio instruction (IRI) intervention envisioned as a medium-term response plan to address school closures amidst the global Coronavirus pandemic. The project has been envisioned by a local development agency in the province of Balochistan for adolescent out-of-school (OOS) girls. Design/methodology/approach: This study reports respondents’ academic achievement through the one-group pretest-posttest design method across numeracy, literacy, civic education and indigenous crafts. Participating adolescent girl respondents were randomly selected from six districts of Balochistan and the results assert a positive impact of IRI intervention. Thus, showcasing IRI as a promising approach to address protracted challenges of educational accessibility in remote areas of Pakistan. Findings: The mean score comparison of pre-test–post-test across four curriculum subjects indicates the greatest gains in numeracy and civic education. Results also highlight the significance of the pedagogical capacity of IRI developers and the quality of supplementary educational kits paired with IRI during this intervention. Research limitations/implications: The findings of this study focus on design and implementation phases eliminating the analysis of learners’ behaviour, environmental factors and family support. Further research is suggested to identify gaps in related dimensions for the success of IRI in Pakistan. Originality/value: This study contributes data-driven findings from a pioneer on-going IRI project in Balochistan, a hard-to-reach province where the ratio of OOS adolescent girls exceeds 78%. This study also proposes vital steps for the longevity of IRI to solve protracted educational crises in Pakistan. © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited.

15.
Robson, S. C.; Connor, T. R.; Loman, N. J.; Golubchik, T.; Nunez, R. T. M.; Bonsall, D.; Rambaut, A.; Snell, L. B.; Livett, R.; Ludden, C.; Corden, S.; Nastouli, E.; Nebbia, G.; Johnston, I.; Lythgoe, K.; Torok, M. E.; Goodfellow, I. G.; Prieto, J. A.; Saeed, K.; Jackson, D. K.; Houlihan, C.; Frampton, D.; Hamilton, W. L.; Witney, A. A.; Bucca, G.; Pope, C. F.; Moore, C.; Thomson, E. C.; Harrison, E. M.; Smith, C. P.; Rogan, F.; Beckwith, S. M.; Murray, A.; Singleton, D.; Eastick, K.; Sheridan, L. A.; Randell, P.; Jackson, L. M.; Ariani, C. V.; Gonçalves, S.; Fairley, D. J.; Loose, M. W.; Watkins, J.; Moses, S.; Nicholls, S.; Bull, M.; Amato, R.; Smith, D. L.; Aanensen, D. M.; Barrett, J. C.; Aggarwal, D.; Shepherd, J. G.; Curran, M. D.; Parmar, S.; Parker, M. D.; Williams, C.; Glaysher, S.; Underwood, A. P.; Bashton, M.; Loveson, K. F.; Byott, M.; Pacchiarini, N.; Carabelli, A. M.; Templeton, K. E.; de Silva, T. I.; Wang, D.; Langford, C. F.; Sillitoe, J.; Gunson, R. N.; Cottrell, S.; O'Grady, J.; Kwiatkowski, D.; Lillie, P. J.; Cortes, N.; Moore, N.; Thomas, C.; Burns, P. J.; Mahungu, T. W.; Liggett, S.; Beckett, A. H.; Holden, M. T. G.; Levett, L. J.; Osman, H.; Hassan-Ibrahim, M. O.; Simpson, D. A.; Chand, M.; Gupta, R. K.; Darby, A. C.; Paterson, S.; Pybus, O. G.; Volz, E. M.; de Angelis, D.; Robertson, D. L.; Page, A. J.; Martincorena, I.; Aigrain, L.; Bassett, A. R.; Wong, N.; Taha, Y.; Erkiert, M. J.; Chapman, M. H. S.; Dewar, R.; McHugh, M. P.; Mookerjee, S.; Aplin, S.; Harvey, M.; Sass, T.; Umpleby, H.; Wheeler, H.; McKenna, J. P.; Warne, B.; Taylor, J. F.; Chaudhry, Y.; Izuagbe, R.; Jahun, A. S.; Young, G. R.; McMurray, C.; McCann, C. M.; Nelson, A.; Elliott, S.; Lowe, H.; Price, A.; Crown, M. R.; Rey, S.; Roy, S.; Temperton, B.; Shaaban, S.; Hesketh, A. R.; Laing, K. G.; Monahan, I. M.; Heaney, J.; Pelosi, E.; Silviera, S.; Wilson-Davies, E.; Adams, H.; du Plessis, L.; Johnson, R.; Harvey, W. T.; Hughes, J.; Orton, R. J.; Spurgin, L. G.; Bourgeois, Y.; Ruis, C.; O'Toole, Á, Gourtovaia, M.; Sanderson, T.; Fraser, C.; Edgeworth, J.; Breuer, J.; Michell, S. L.; Todd, J. A.; John, M.; Buck, D.; Gajee, K.; Kay, G. L.; Peacock, S. J.; Heyburn, D.; Kitchman, K.; McNally, A.; Pritchard, D. T.; Dervisevic, S.; Muir, P.; Robinson, E.; Vipond, B. B.; Ramadan, N. A.; Jeanes, C.; Weldon, D.; Catalan, J.; Jones, N.; da Silva Filipe, A.; Williams, C.; Fuchs, M.; Miskelly, J.; Jeffries, A. R.; Oliver, K.; Park, N. R.; Ash, A.; Koshy, C.; Barrow, M.; Buchan, S. L.; Mantzouratou, A.; Clark, G.; Holmes, C. W.; Campbell, S.; Davis, T.; Tan, N. K.; Brown, J. R.; Harris, K. A.; Kidd, S. P.; Grant, P. R.; Xu-McCrae, L.; Cox, A.; Madona, P.; Pond, M.; Randell, P. A.; Withell, K. T.; Williams, C.; Graham, C.; Denton-Smith, R.; Swindells, E.; Turnbull, R.; Sloan, T. J.; Bosworth, A.; Hutchings, S.; Pymont, H. M.; Casey, A.; Ratcliffe, L.; Jones, C. R.; Knight, B. A.; Haque, T.; Hart, J.; Irish-Tavares, D.; Witele, E.; Mower, C.; Watson, L. K.; Collins, J.; Eltringham, G.; Crudgington, D.; Macklin, B.; Iturriza-Gomara, M.; Lucaci, A. O.; McClure, P. C.; Carlile, M.; Holmes, N.; Moore, C.; Storey, N.; Rooke, S.; Yebra, G.; Craine, N.; Perry, M.; Fearn, N. C.; Goudarzi, S.; Lyons, R. A.; Williams, T.; Haldenby, S. T.; Durham, J.; Leonard, S.; Davies, R. M.; Batra, R.; Blane, B.; Spyer, M. J.; Smith, P.; Yavus, M.; Williams, R. J.; Mahanama, A. I. K.; Samaraweera, B.; Girgis, S. T.; Hansford, S. E.; Green, A.; Beaver, C.; Bellis, K. L.; Dorman, M. J.; Kay, S.; Prestwood, L.; Rajatileka, S.; Quick, J.; Poplawski, R.; Reynolds, N.; Mack, A.; Morriss, A.; Whalley, T.; Patel, B.; Georgana, I.; Hosmillo, M.; Pinckert, M. L.; Stockton, J.; Henderson, J. H.; Hollis, A.; Stanley, W.; Yew, W. C.; Myers, R.; Thornton, A.; Adams, A.; Annett, T.; Asad, H.; Birchley, A.; Coombes, J.; Evans, J. 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Embase;
Preprint in English | EMBASE | ID: ppcovidwho-326811

ABSTRACT

The scale of data produced during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has been unprecedented, with more than 5 million sequences shared publicly at the time of writing. This wealth of sequence data provides important context for interpreting local outbreaks. However, placing sequences of interest into national and international context is difficult given the size of the global dataset. Often outbreak investigations and genomic surveillance efforts require running similar analyses again and again on the latest dataset and producing reports. We developed civet (cluster investigation and virus epidemiology tool) to aid these routine analyses and facilitate virus outbreak investigation and surveillance. Civet can place sequences of interest in the local context of background diversity, resolving the query into different 'catchments' and presenting the phylogenetic results alongside metadata in an interactive, distributable report. Civet can be used on a fine scale for clinical outbreak investigation, for local surveillance and cluster discovery, and to routinely summarise the virus diversity circulating on a national level. Civet reports have helped researchers and public health bodies feedback genomic information in the appropriate context within a timeframe that is useful for public health.

16.
SSRN;
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-326218

ABSTRACT

Universities and other educational institutions along with libraries are closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Libraries face difficulties due to COVID-19 outbreaks but ensure continuity of the teaching and learning process. This research aimed to look into the effects on university libraries and their responses to the COVID-19 lockdown in India. The researchers have collected data using a structured closed and open-ended online questionnaire and collected data has been interpreted and depicted in figures. The study discussed: awareness of COVID-19, library status, communication channels, target users, resource availability and shareability, and how libraries fulfil user requirements and challenges. No such study has been conducted mainly in the context of Indian universities.

17.
Pak J Med Sci ; 38(3Part-I): 612-616, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1675227

ABSTRACT

Objective: To establish correlation between serum albumin during early days of ICU admission and risk of death in COVID-19 pneumonia. Methods: In this retrospective study, we included 76 patients hospitalized in ICU, who stayed for at least four days with COVID-19 pneumonia, from May 1, 2020 to June 30, 2020 in Lahore Health Care Hospital and Al-Shafi Hospital. Patients were labelled as COVID-19 pneumonia on radiological basis as bilateral 'ground-glass opacity' in lower zones and RT-PCR positive result in nasopharyngeal swab. All patients were oxygen dependent, either on high flow oxygen via non rebreathing mask or invasive positive pressure ventilation support. Serum albumin levels were measured daily from first day to fourth day of ICU admission. The data was analyzed using SPSS version 26 and Microsoft excel 2016. Results: Out of 76 patients of COVID-19 pneumonia admitted in ICU who stayed for more than four days, 38 patients expired. The mean age of all the patients was 58.9±12.56 years, 38(50%) of the patients were ≥60 years and 49 (62%) of them were male. On day four of ICU admission, mean serum albumin of discharged patients was 3.83±0.22 g/dl while mean serum albumin level of expired patients was 2.96±0.46 g/dl. Strong negative correlation (r = -767) was found between decrease in serum albumin level and increase number of deaths from COVID-19 pneumonia. Weak correlation was observed between increase in serum CRP and increase number of deaths in the same patients. Conclusion: Daily monitoring of serum albumin level of COVID-19 pneumonia patients can be used as a biological marker for monitoring of cytokine storm and risk of death in COVID-19 pneumonia.

18.
European Journal of Clinical Pharmacy ; 23(2):114-118, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1548583

ABSTRACT

Background: According to World Health Organization (WHO), COVID-19 is a contagious and infectious disease caused by the novel virus SARS-CoV-2 which mainly affects the lungs and also damages many other organs. This organ damage may increase the risk of long-term health problems. Objective: We aimed to systematically review the literature to outline the organ damage caused by COVID-19 infection and its long-term effects. Method: We systematically searched the database «PubMed» which included studies that measured organ damage associated with COVID-19 and their long-term effects among infected patients. Results: A total of 53 studies were reviewed and screened based on titles and s. Of these, only nine studies were determined to meet the eligibility criteria for discussion. Body systems and organs that may be affected by COVID-19 infection were the heart, lungs, brain and nervous system, musculoskeletal, and kidney. The possible long-term effects identified in these studies were damage to heart muscles, heart failure, damage to lung tissues and restrictive lung failure, anosmia (loss of sense of smell), and the consequences of thrombo-embolic events, stroke, heart attack, cognitive impairment,depression, anxiety, sleep disturbance, pain in muscles and joints. Conclusion: Many long-term COVID-19 effects are still unknown and how COVID-19 will affect people over time. © 2021 Rasgo Editorial S.A.. All rights reserved.

19.
Microbiol Resour Announc ; 10(42): e0091221, 2021 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483992

ABSTRACT

We announce the complete genome sequences of 12 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) sublineage B.1.617.2 strains (Delta variant) obtained from nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swab samples from 12 pediatric patients in Chittagong, Bangladesh, displaying COVID-19 symptoms. Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencing technology was used to generate the genomic sequences.

20.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 15(9):2175-2177, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1469044

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 pandemic has become a foremost health concern, many countries have ordered lockdown to stop the spread of COVID-19 due to which many Universities are closed and students are taking lectures online, Pakistan is also one of the countries in which lockdown was imposed, the aim of this study is to examine the level of physical activity and lifestyle of medical students from University of Lahore (UoL) during COVID-19. Aim: To determine the effect of COVID-19 lockdown on the physical activity and lifestyle of medical students of University of Lahore. Materials: Sample size included 151 medical students from the University of Lahore, study was pure cross-sectional and convenient sampling technique was used, data was collected through online questionnaire which contained question from IPAQ-SF to estimate the physical activity and lifestyle of observed University students. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 25. Results: The results showed that from the population of 151 medical students of University of Lahore 75 students (49.7%) reported Low level of physical activity, while 44 students (29.1%) students reported Moderate level of physical activity, and 32 students (21.2%) reported high level of physical activity. Conclusion: Majority of the medical students showed Low level of physical activity, 49.7% in the last 7 days during COVID-19 pandemic. Medical students of University of Lahore showed a decrease in their overall physical activity level.

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