Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Chemical Engineering Transactions ; 89:61-66, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1625686

ABSTRACT

The effects and aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and ensuing Movement Control Order (MCO) will be felt for a long while, even after the MCO period ends. It is imperative to determine and measure the level of knowledge and readiness among Safety and Health Competent Persons (SHCPs) and Training Providers (TPs) in handling issues relating to COVID-19 during the MCO in Malaysia. A survey instrument was developed and validated by expert panels from academia and enforcement agency. A pilot study involving 40 respondents showed high reliability, with a Cronbach's alpha score of 0.95 and 0.96 for SHCP and TP. A fullblown research was carried out for two weeks from the 14th to 28th of April 2020. This cross-sectional study covers all states in Malaysia and has been distributed to approximately 3,000 respondents with a response rate of 10.6 % from respondents employed in various sectors. The construction sectors recorded the highest percentage of responses as compared to other sectors at 37 % followed by manufacturing sectors at 23 % and public services and statutory authorities at 18 %. The companies are a mix of small, medium-sized enterprises (47 %), and large establishments (53 %), which altogether have a wide range of turnover rates. This study highlights that SHCPs and TPs in Malaysia have moderate post-MCO awareness and readiness in terms of knowledge, skills, standard operating procedure, social distancing, and basic equipment to control and curb workplace contagion after the MCO is lifted. There are uncertainties regarding the TP's willingness to budget for and bear the daily costs of the decontamination procedure, personal protective equipment usage, space availability, and the COVID-19 screening process. The readiness of SHCPs and TPs have been measured and identified. SHCPs and TPs need more knowledge in post-MCO COVID-19 management, especially in terms of the capacity of the trained staff to adequately screen workers for COVID-19 symptoms after the MCO is lifted. SHCPs and TPs believe they are underprepared, but they are willing to learn more about pandemic preparedness if training options are provided. A plan of action to address these issues has been proposed to DOSH Malaysia for guidance on formulating the next step forward. © 2021, AIDIC Servizi S.r.l.

2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-294726

ABSTRACT

Objectives To assess the effectiveness of prone positioning to reduce the risk of death or respiratory failure in non-critically ill patients hospitalized with COVID-19 Design Pragmatic randomized clinical trial of prone positioning of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 across 15 hospitals in Canada and the United States from May 2020 until May 2021. Settings Patients were eligible is they had a laboratory-confirmed or a clinically highly suspected diagnosis of COVID-19, required supplemental oxygen (up to 50% fraction of inspired oxygen [FiO2]), and were able to independently prone with verbal instruction. ( NCT04383613 ). Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was a composite of in-hospital death, mechanical ventilation, or worsening respiratory failure defined as requiring at least 60% FiO2 for at least 24 hours. Secondary outcomes included the change in the ratio of oxygen saturation to FiO2 (S/F ratio). Results A total of 248 patients were included. The trial was stopped early on the basis of futility for the pre-specified primary outcome. The median time from hospital admission until randomization was 1 day, the median age of patients was 56 years (interquartile range [IQR] 45,65), 36% were female, and 90% of patients were receiving oxygen via nasal prongs at the time of randomization. The median time spent prone in the first 72 hours was 6 hours total (IQR 1.5,12.8) for the prone arm compared to 0 hours (0,2) in the control arm. The risk of the primary outcome was similar between the prone group (18 [14.3%] events) and the standard care group (17 [13.9%] events), odds ratio 0.92 (95% CI 0.44 to 1.92). The change in the S/F ratio after 72 hours was similar for patients randomized to prone compared to standard of care. Conclusion Among hypoxic but not critically patients with COVID-19 in hospital, a multifaceted intervention to increase prone positioning did not improve outcomes. Adherence to prone positioning was poor, despite multiple efforts. Subsequent trials of prone positioning should aim to develop strategies to improve adherence to awake prone positioning. What is already known on this topic Prone positioning is considered standard of care for mechanically ventilated patients who have severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. Recent data suggest prone positioning is beneficial for patients with COVID-19 who are requiring high flow oxygen. It is unknown of prone positioning is beneficial for patients not on high flow oxygen. What this study adds Prone positioning is generally not well tolerated and innovative approaches are needed to improve adherence. Clinical and physiologic outcomes were not improved with prone positioning among hypoxic but not critically ill patients hospitalized with COVID-19.

3.
American Journal of Gastroenterology ; 116(SUPPL):S304, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1534675

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has created challenges in upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) management due to concerns regarding aerosolization during endoscopy and patient hesitancy in presenting to hospital. The impact of the pandemic on UGIB outcomes is not well described. Methods: We described adults with UGIB admitted to general medicine services or intensive care units (ICU) during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (March 1-June 30 2020) at 7 hospitals in Toronto and Mississauga, Ontario. The historical control group consisted of patients admitted to these hospitals from March 1-June 30, 2018 and March 1-June 30, 2019. We compared primary (inhospital mortality) and secondary outcomes (ICU utilization, transfusion requirements, persistent bleeding, and need for angiographic/surgical management of bleeding) using multivariable regression models, controlling for patient demographic factors, comorbidities, severity and etiology of bleeding, and admitting hospital. Results: There were 363 admissions for UGIB from March 1-June 30, 2020 (COVID-19 period) and 950 admissions from March 1-June 30 2018 and 2019 (historical control period). There were no differences between the two groups with respect to baseline variables of age, sex, underlying cirrhosis, Charlson comorbidity index, and the modified Glasgow-Blatchford and pre-endoscopy Rockall mortality risk scores (Table 1). Patients in the COVID-19 time period were less likely to undergo endoscopy (64% vs. 71%, p=0.015). There were no differences between the two groups for the primary outcome of in-hospital mortality or any secondary outcomes (Table 1). On multivariable analysis, patients admitted with UGIB during the COVID-19 time period did not have greater inhospital mortality (odds ratio [OR]50.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.30-1.57), or any differences in ICU utilization, number of red blood cell units transfused, persistent bleeding, and angiographic/ surgical management. Conclusion: Although fewer patients admitted to hospital with UGIB during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic received endoscopy, there was no difference in clinical outcomes.

4.
ARPN Journal of Engineering and Applied Sciences ; 16(14):1536-1545, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1444801

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) a newly discovered virus that infects humans and is categorized as a global pandemic. Including in Indonesia, everyday case of COVID-19 increases and gets worse. In this digital era, we always use mobile smartphones every day to do our activities, that is why Traker choosesa mobile platform for development. Traker is a mobile application to trace and record the activity of an infected person, also to show any information about COVID-19 to the community as we proposed in Jakarta city. Traker works both on Android and iOS and Traker uses GPS method solution to track down the infected. The proposed model was designed using Unified Modeling Language (UML) such as a use case diagram for figure out the business process in the systems whilst a class diagram was used to design the database model. Android studio was used to implement the systems where each displayed user interfaces as a print screen of the running prototype application © 2006-2021 Asian Research Publishing Network (ARPN). All rights reserved.

5.
Sains Malaysiana ; 50(5):1497-1509, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1291544

ABSTRACT

Reopening strategies are crucial to balance efforts of economic revitalization and bringing back a sense of normalcy while mitigating outbreaks and effectively flattening the infection curve. This paper proposes practical reopening, monitoring and testing strategies for institutions to reintroduce physical meetings based on SIR simulations run on a student friendship network collected pre-COVID-19. These serve as benchmarks to assess several testing strategies that can be applied in physical classes. Our simulations show that the best outbreak mitigation results are obtained with full knowledge of contact, but are also robust to non-compliance of students to new social interaction guidelines, simulated by partial knowledge of the interactions. These results are not only applicable to institutions but also for any organization or company wanting to navigate the COVID-19 ravaged world. © 2021 Penerbit Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia. All rights reserved.

6.
Data Brief ; 32: 106263, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739801

ABSTRACT

The data in this article provide information on spectroscopic and theoretical data for p-chlorocalix[4]arene when combined with selected drugs, such as paracetamol, ibuprofen, and cetirizine. The present spectroscopic data are generated from Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H NMR and 13C NMR), and Ultraviolet-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) as the key tools for molecular characterization. The measurement of the optimization energy, interaction energy, and the band gap energy between the molecules was calculated by Gaussian 09 software. It is interesting to note that of the three titled drugs identified, p-chlorocalix[4]arene showed the highest interaction energy with paracetamol, followed by ibuprofen and cetirizine.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL