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1.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 908, 2021 Sep 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455937

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pre-existing comorbidities have been linked to SARS-CoV-2 infection but evidence is sparse on the importance and pattern of multimorbidity (2 or more conditions) and severity of infection indicated by hospitalisation or mortality. We aimed to use a multimorbidity index developed specifically for COVID-19 to investigate the association between multimorbidity and risk of severe SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: We used data from the UK Biobank linked to laboratory confirmed test results for SARS-CoV-2 infection and mortality data from Public Health England between March 16 and July 26, 2020. By reviewing the current literature on COVID-19 we derived a multimorbidity index including: (1) angina; (2) asthma; (3) atrial fibrillation; (4) cancer; (5) chronic kidney disease; (6) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; (7) diabetes mellitus; (8) heart failure; (9) hypertension; (10) myocardial infarction; (11) peripheral vascular disease; (12) stroke. Adjusted logistic regression models were used to assess the association between multimorbidity and risk of severe SARS-CoV-2 infection (hospitalisation/death). Potential effect modifiers of the association were assessed: age, sex, ethnicity, deprivation, smoking status, body mass index, air pollution, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, cardiorespiratory fitness, high sensitivity C-reactive protein. RESULTS: Among 360,283 participants, the median age was 68 [range 48-85] years, most were White (94.5%), and 1706 had severe SARS-CoV-2 infection. The prevalence of multimorbidity was more than double in those with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection (25%) compared to those without (11%), and clusters of several multimorbidities were more common in those with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection. The most common clusters with severe SARS-CoV-2 infection were stroke with hypertension (79% of those with stroke had hypertension); diabetes and hypertension (72%); and chronic kidney disease and hypertension (68%). Multimorbidity was independently associated with a greater risk of severe SARS-CoV-2 infection (adjusted odds ratio 1.91 [95% confidence interval 1.70, 2.15] compared to no multimorbidity). The risk remained consistent across potential effect modifiers, except for greater risk among older age. The highest risk of severe infection was strongly evidenced in those with CKD and diabetes (4.93 [95% CI 3.36, 7.22]). CONCLUSION: The multimorbidity index may help identify individuals at higher risk for severe COVID-19 outcomes and provide guidance for tailoring effective treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Hospitalization , Humans , Middle Aged , Multimorbidity , Risk Factors
2.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 717, 2021 Jul 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394426

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although age, obesity and pre-existing chronic diseases are established risk factors for COVID-19 outcomes, their interactions have not been well researched. METHODS: We used data from the Clinical Characterisation Protocol UK (CCP-UK) for Severe Emerging Infection developed by the International Severe Acute Respiratory and emerging Infections Consortium (ISARIC). Patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 from 6th February to 12th October 2020 were included where there was a coded outcome following hospital admission. Obesity was determined by an assessment from a clinician and chronic disease by medical records. Chronic diseases included: chronic cardiac disease, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, chronic pulmonary disease, diabetes and cancer. Mutually exclusive categories of obesity, with or without chronic disease, were created. Associations with in-hospital mortality were examined across sex and age categories. RESULTS: The analysis included 27,624 women with 6407 (23.2%) in-hospital deaths and 35,065 men with 10,001 (28.5%) in-hospital deaths. The prevalence of chronic disease in women and men was 66.3 and 68.5%, respectively, while that of obesity was 12.9 and 11.1%, respectively. Association of obesity and chronic disease status varied by age (p < 0.001). Under 50 years of age, obesity and chronic disease were associated with in-hospital mortality within 28 days of admission in a dose-response manner, such that patients with both obesity and chronic disease had the highest risk with a hazard ratio (HR) of in-hospital mortality of 2.99 (95% CI: 2.12, 4.21) in men and 2.16 (1.42, 3.26) in women compared to patients without obesity or chronic disease. Between the ages of 50-69 years, obesity and chronic disease remained associated with in-hospital COVID-19 mortality, but survival in those with obesity was similar to those with and without prevalent chronic disease. Beyond the age of 70 years in men and 80 years in women there was no meaningful difference between those with and without obesity and/or chronic disease. CONCLUSION: Obesity and chronic disease are important risk factors for in-hospital mortality in younger age groups, with the combination of chronic disease and obesity being particularly important in those under 50 years of age. These findings have implications for targeted public health interventions, vaccination strategies and in-hospital clinical decision making.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Chronic Disease , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology
3.
Mayo Clin Proc Innov Qual Outcomes ; 5(6): 997-1007, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364354

ABSTRACT

Objective: To quantify the association between accelerometer-assessed physical activity and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outcomes. Methods: Data from 82,253 UK Biobank participants with accelerometer data (measured 2013-2015), complete covariate data, and linked COVID-19 data from March 16, 2020, to March 16, 2021, were included. Two outcomes were investigated: severe COVID-19 (positive test result from in-hospital setting or COVID-19 as primary cause of death) and nonsevere COVID-19 (positive test result from community setting). Logistic regressions were used to assess associations with moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), total activity, and intensity gradient. A higher intensity gradient indicates a higher proportion of vigorous activity. Results: Average MVPA was 48.1 (32.7) min/d. Physical activity was associated with lower odds of severe COVID-19 (adjusted odds ratio per standard deviation increase: MVPA, 0.75 [95% CI, 0.67 to 0.85]; total, 0.83 [0.74 to 0.92]; intensity, 0.77 [0.70 to 0.86]), with stronger associations in women (MVPA, 0.63 [0.52 to 0.77]; total, 0.76 [0.64 to 0.90]; intensity, 0.63 [0.53 to 0.74]) than in men (MVPA, 0.84 [0.73 to 0.97]; total, 0.88 [0.77 to 1.01]; intensity, 0.88 [0.77 to 1.00]). In contrast, when mutually adjusted, total activity was associated with higher odds of a nonsevere infection (1.10 [1.04 to 1.16]), whereas the intensity gradient was associated with lower odds (0.91 [0.86 to 0.97]). Conclusion: Odds of severe COVID-19 were approximately 25% lower per standard deviation (∼30 min/d) MVPA. A greater proportion of vigorous activity was associated with lower odds of severe and nonsevere infections. The association between total activity and higher odds of a nonsevere infection may be through greater community engagement and thus more exposure to the virus. Results support calls for public health messaging highlighting the potential of MVPA for reducing the odds of severe COVID-19.

4.
BMJ Open ; 11(7): e053402, 2021 07 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322829

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine inequalities in COVID-19 vaccination rates among elderly adults in England. DESIGN: Cohort study. SETTING: People living in private households and communal establishments in England. PARTICIPANTS: 6 655 672 adults aged ≥70 years (mean 78.8 years, 55.2% women) who were alive on 15 March 2021. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Having received the first dose of a vaccine against COVID-19 by 15 March 2021. We calculated vaccination rates and estimated unadjusted and adjusted ORs using logistic regression models. RESULTS: By 15 March 2021, 93.2% of people living in England aged 70 years and over had received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. While vaccination rates differed across all factors considered apart from sex, the greatest disparities were seen between ethnic and religious groups. The lowest rates were in people of black African and black Caribbean ethnic backgrounds, where only 67.2% and 73.8% had received a vaccine, with adjusted odds of not being vaccinated at 5.01 (95% CI 4.86 to 5.16) and 4.85 (4.75 to 4.96) times greater than the white British group. The proportion of individuals self-identifying as Muslim and Buddhist who had received a vaccine was 79.1% and 84.1%, respectively. Older age, greater area deprivation, less advantaged socioeconomic position (proxied by living in a rented home), being disabled and living either alone or in a multigenerational household were also associated with higher odds of not having received the vaccine. CONCLUSION: Research is now urgently needed to understand why disparities exist in these groups and how they can best be addressed through public health policy and community engagement.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , England , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Semantic Web , Vaccination , Vaccination Coverage
5.
Obesity (Silver Spring) ; 29(7): 1223-1230, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146942

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of obesity with in-hospital coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outcomes in different ethnic groups. METHODS: Patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 in the United Kingdom through the Clinical Characterisation Protocol UK (CCP-UK) developed by the International Severe Acute Respiratory and emerging Infections Consortium (ISARIC) were included from February 6 to October 12, 2020. Ethnicity was classified as White, South Asian, Black, and other minority ethnic groups. Outcomes were admission to critical care, mechanical ventilation, and in-hospital mortality, adjusted for age, sex, and chronic diseases. RESULTS: Of the participants included, 54,254 (age = 76 years; 45.0% women) were White, 3,728 (57 years; 41.1% women) were South Asian, 2,523 (58 years; 44.9% women) were Black, and 5,427 (61 years; 40.8% women) were other ethnicities. Obesity was associated with all outcomes in all ethnic groups, with associations strongest for black ethnicities. When stratified by ethnicity and obesity status, the odds ratios for admission to critical care, mechanical ventilation, and mortality in black ethnicities with obesity were 3.91 (3.13-4.88), 5.03 (3.94-6.63), and 1.93 (1.49-2.51), respectively, compared with White ethnicities without obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity was associated with an elevated risk of in-hospital COVID-19 outcomes in all ethnic groups, with associations strongest in Black ethnicities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Ethnic Groups/statistics & numerical data , Minority Groups/statistics & numerical data , Obesity/ethnology , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , United Kingdom , Young Adult
6.
Eur J Public Health ; 31(3): 630-634, 2021 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142653

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People from South Asian and black minority ethnic groups are disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. It is unknown whether deprivation mediates this excess ethnic risk. METHODS: We used UK Biobank with linked COVID-19 outcomes occurring between 16th March 2020 and 24th August 2020. A four-way decomposition mediation analysis was used to model the extent to which the excess risk of testing positive, severe disease and mortality for COVID-19 in South Asian and black individuals, relative to white individuals, would be eliminated if levels of high material deprivation were reduced within the population. RESULTS: We included 15 044 (53.0% women) South Asian and black and 392 786 (55.2% women) white individuals. There were 151 (1.0%) positive tests, 91 (0.6%) severe cases and 31 (0.2%) deaths due to COVID-19 in South Asian and black individuals compared with 1471 (0.4%), 895 (0.2%) and 313 (0.1%), respectively, in white individuals. Compared with white individuals, the relative risk of testing positive for COVID-19, developing severe disease and COVID-19 mortality in South Asian and black individuals were 2.73 (95% CI: 2.26, 3.19), 2.96 (2.31, 3.61) and 4.04 (2.54, 5.55), respectively. A hypothetical intervention moving the 25% most deprived in the population out of deprivation was modelled to eliminate between 40 and 50% of the excess risk of all COVID-19 outcomes in South Asian and black populations, whereas moving the 50% most deprived out of deprivation would eliminate over 80% of the excess risk of COVID-19 outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The excess risk of COVID-19 outcomes in South Asian and black communities could be substantially reduced with population level policies targeting material deprivation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ethnic Groups , Female , Humans , Male , Minority Groups , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Int J Obes (Lond) ; 45(5): 1155-1159, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1104458

ABSTRACT

Obesity is an emerging risk factor for coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Simple measures of physical fitness, such as self-reported walking pace, may also be important risk markers. This analysis includes 412,596 UK Biobank participants with linked COVID-19 data (median age at linkage = 68 years, obese = 24%, median number of comorbidities = 1). As of August 24th 2020, there were 1001 cases of severe (in-hospital) disease and 336 COVID-19 deaths. Compared to normal weight individuals, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of severe COVID-19 in overweight and obese individuals was 1.26 (1.07, 1.48) and 1.49 (1.25, 1.79), respectively. For COVID-19 mortality, the ORs were 1.19 (0.88, 161) and 1.82 (1.33, 2.49), respectively. Compared to those with a brisk walking pace, the OR of severe COVID-19 for steady/average and slow walkers was 1.13 (0.98, 1.31) and 1.88 (1.53, 2.31), respectively. For COVID-19 mortality, the ORs were 1.44 (1.10, 1.90) and 1.83 (1.26, 2.65), respectively. Slow walkers had the highest risk regardless of obesity status. For example, compared to normal weight brisk walkers, the OR of severe disease and COVID-19 mortality in normal weight slow walkers was 2.42 (1.53, 3.84) and 3.75 (1.61, 8.70), respectively. Self-reported slow walkers appear to be a high-risk group for severe COVID-19 outcomes independent of obesity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Obesity/epidemiology , Walking Speed/physiology , Aged , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , Comorbidity , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom
8.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 96(1): 156-164, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065442

ABSTRACT

Behavioral lifestyle factors are associated with cardiometabolic disease and obesity, which are risk factors for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We aimed to investigate whether physical activity, and the timing and balance of physical activity and sleep/rest, were associated with SARS-CoV-2 positivity and COVID-19 severity. Data from 91,248 UK Biobank participants with accelerometer data and complete covariate and linked COVID-19 data to July 19, 2020, were included. The risk of SARS-CoV-2 positivity and COVID-19 severity-in relation to overall physical activity, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), balance between activity and sleep/rest, and variability in timing of sleep/rest-was assessed with adjusted logistic regression. Of 207 individuals with a positive test result, 124 were classified as having a severe infection. Overall physical activity and MVPA were not associated with severe COVID-19, whereas a poor balance between activity and sleep/rest was (odds ratio [OR] per standard deviation: 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.62 to 0.81]). This finding was related to higher daytime activity being associated with lower risk (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.61 to 0.93) but higher movement during sleep/rest being associated with higher risk (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.42) of severe infection. Greater variability in timing of sleep/rest was also associated with increased risk (OR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.35). Results for testing positive were broadly consistent. In conclusion, these results highlight the importance of not just physical activity, but also quality sleep/rest and regular sleep/rest patterns, on risk of COVID-19. Our findings indicate the risk of COVID-19 was consistently approximately 1.2-fold greater per approximately 40-minute increase in variability in timing of proxy measures of sleep, indicative of irregular sleeping patterns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise , Rest , Sleep , Accelerometry , Aged , Biological Specimen Banks , Female , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , United Kingdom/epidemiology
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