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1.
Res Dev Disabil ; 136: 104480, 2023 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2290878

ABSTRACT

Growing international consensus in recognising rights of individuals with disability to enabling environments has spurred on provision of services for support for these individuals. The provision of this support has however been variable across the globe, often depending upon the economic development and social stigma associated with disability within individual countries. Individuals with Mental health learning disability have experienced even more stigma and limitations to access care. Qatar, a young and economically prosperous country, has adopted this rights-based approach to developing services for individuals with learning disability. This has led to the development of a specialist mental health learning disability services which is taking its initial steps within the country. This specialist service places the individual and their family at the centre of developing and delivering care and aims at reducing stigma and improving access to specialist evidence-based care.


Subject(s)
Learning Disabilities , Mental Health , Humans , Qatar , Social Stigma , Human Rights , Health Services Accessibility
2.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 104, 2022 Feb 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962772

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Infection control measures during the Covid-19 pandemic have focused on limiting physical contact and decontamination by observing cleaning and hygiene rituals. Breastfeeding requires close physical contact and observance of hygienic measures like handwashing. Worries around contamination increase during the perinatal period and can be expressed as increase in obsessive compulsive symptoms. These symptoms have shown to impact breastfeeding rates. This study attempts to explore any relationship between the Covid-19 pandemic and perinatal obsessive-compulsive symptomatology and whether the Covid-19 pandemic has any impact on intent to breastfeed. METHODS: A cross sectional survey of perinatal women attending largest maternity centre in Qatar was carried out during the months of October to December 2020. Socio-demographic information, intent to breastfeed and information around obsessive compulsive thoughts around Covid-19 pandemic were collected using validated tools. RESULTS: 15.7% respondents report intent to not breastfeed. 21.4% respondents reported obsessive-compulsive symptoms. 77.3% respondents believed the biggest source of infection was from others while as only 12% of the respondents believed that the source of infection was through breastfeeding and 15.7% believed the vertical transmission as the main source of risk of transmission. CONCLUSIONS: The rates of Obsessive-compulsive symptoms were increased and the rates of intent to breastfeed were decreased when compared with pre pandemic rates. The obsessive-compulsive symptoms and the intent to not breastfeed were significantly associated with fear of infection to the new-born. Obsessive-compulsive symptoms were not significantly correlated with intent to breastfeed and can be seen as adaptive strategies utilized by women to continue breastfeeding in the context of fear of infection.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Intention , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Hygiene , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Perinatal Care , Pregnancy , Qatar/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Front Public Health ; 9: 727748, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405443

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Healthcare workers are the critical frontline workforce of the COVD-19 pandemic and are considered a target group for vaccination. Hesitancy to vaccinate is a major concern that can jeopardize the vaccination programme. The hesitancy rates in the general population and healthcare workers (HCWs) vary globally, and more importantly, hesitancy in HCWs is of particular concern, as it can influence the wider population. Materials and Methods: The present study evaluated the vaccine hesitancy rate and its sociodemographic and attitudinal factors among the HCWs in the state of Qatar. We conducted a national cross-sectional survey using a validated hesitancy measurement tool between October 15 and November 15, 2020. A total of 7,821 adults above the age of 18 years out of the 2.3 million adult Qatari residents completed the survey. While majority of the participants were from the general public, 1,546 participants were HCWs. Sociodemographic data, along with attitudes and beliefs around COVID-19 vaccination, were collected from the respondents. Results: We found that 12.9% of the study participants showed vaccine hesitancy, defined as definitely or probably will not take the vaccine if offered, and 25.31% reported that they were unsure about the uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine. Female respondents were more hesitant toward the vaccine. Safety and efficacy concerns of vaccine were the significant predictors of vaccine hesitancy. The primary predictor for vaccine acceptance was a better understanding of the disease and vaccine. Discussion: Overall, 1 in 8 HCWs were reluctant to get vaccinated against COVID-19, mainly due to concerns about the vaccine's efficacy and safety. Education about the vaccine's safety and efficacy can potentially improve acceptance among healthcare workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Attitude , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Qatar , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses ; 15(3): 361-370, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1091047

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccine hesitancy is a global threat undermining control of preventable infections. Emerging evidence suggests that hesitancy to COVID-19 vaccination varies globally. Qatar has a unique population with around 90% of the population being economic migrants, and the degree and determinants of hesitancy are not known. METHODS: This study was carried out to evaluate the degree of vaccine hesitancy and its socio-demographic and attitudinal determinants across a representative sample. A national cross-sectional study using validated hesitancy measurement tool was carried out from October 15, 2020, to November 15, 2020. A total of 7821 adults completed the survey. Relevant socio-demographic data along with attitudes and beliefs around COVID-19 vaccination were collected from the respondents. RESULTS: 20.2% of the respondents stated they would not take the vaccine and 19.8% reported being unsure about taking the prospective COVID-19 vaccine. Citizens and females were more likely to be vaccine hesitators than immigrants and males, respectively. Concerns around the safety of COVID-19 vaccine and its longer-term side effects were the main concerns cited. Personal research around COVID-19 and vaccine were by far the most preferred methods that would increase confidence in accepting the vaccine across all demographic groups. CONCLUSIONS: This study reports an overall vaccine hesitancy of 20% toward the COVID-19 vaccine and the influence of social media on attitudes toward vaccination which is in keeping with emerging evidence. This finding comes at a time that is close to the start of mass immunization and reports from a migrant-majority population highlighting important socio-demographic determinants around vaccine hesitancy.


Subject(s)
Attitude , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Transients and Migrants , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Intention , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Patient Acceptance of Health Care
6.
Gen Psychiatr ; 33(6): e100313, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-916304
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