Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-8, 2022 Sep 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2036665

ABSTRACT

As COVID-19 was declared a health emergency in March 2020, there was immense demand for information about the novel pathogen. This paper examines the clinician-reported impact of Project ECHO COVID-19 Clinical Rounds on clinician learning. Primary sources of study data were Continuing Medical Education (CME) Surveys for each session from the dates of March 24, 2020 to July 30, 2020 and impact surveys conducted in November 2020, which sought to understand participants' overall assessment of sessions. Quantitative analyses included descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney testing. Qualitative data were analyzed through inductive thematic analysis. Clinicians rated their knowledge after each session as significantly higher than before that session. 75.8% of clinicians reported they would 'definitely' or 'probably' use content gleaned from each attended session and clinicians reported specific clinical and operational changes made as a direct result of sessions. 94.6% of respondents reported that COVID-19 Clinical Rounds helped them provide better care to patients. 89% of respondents indicated they 'strongly agree' that they would join ECHO calls again.COVID-19 Clinical Rounds offers a promising model for the establishment of dynamic peer-to-peer tele-mentoring communities for low or no-notice response where scientifically tested or clinically verified practice evidence is limited.

2.
Front Public Health ; 9: 770039, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686562

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly stressed healthcare systems. The addition of monoclonal antibody (mAb) infusions, which prevent severe disease and reduce hospitalizations, to the repertoire of COVID-19 countermeasures offers the opportunity to reduce system stress but requires strategic planning and use of novel approaches. Our objective was to develop a web-based decision-support tool to help existing and future mAb infusion facilities make better and more informed staffing and capacity decisions. Materials and Methods: Using real-world observations from three medical centers operating with federal field team support, we developed a discrete-event simulation model and performed simulation experiments to assess performance of mAb infusion sites under different conditions. Results: 162,000 scenarios were evaluated by simulations. Our analyses revealed that it was more effective to add check-in staff than to add additional nurses for middle-to-large size sites with ≥2 infusion nurses; that scheduled appointments performed better than walk-ins when patient load was not high; and that reducing infusion time was particularly impactful when load on resources was only slightly above manageable levels. Discussion: Physical capacity, check-in staff, and infusion time were as important as nurses for mAb sites. Health systems can effectively operate an infusion center under different conditions to provide mAb therapeutics even with relatively low investments in physical resources and staff. Conclusion: Simulations of mAb infusion sites were used to create a capacity planning tool to optimize resource utility and allocation in constrained pandemic conditions, and more efficiently treat COVID-19 patients at existing and future mAb infusion sites.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Monoclonal , Humans , Pandemics , Workforce
3.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-32, 2022 Jan 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625403

ABSTRACT

Monoclonal antibody therapeutics to treat COVID-19 have been authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration under Emergency Use Authorization (EUA). Many barriers exist when deploying a novel therapeutic during an ongoing pandemic, and it is critical to assess the needs of incorporating monoclonal antibody infusions into pandemic response activities. We examined the monoclonal antibody infusion site process during the COVID-19 pandemic and conducted a descriptive analysis using data from three sites at medical centers in the U.S. supported by the National Disaster Medical System. Monoclonal antibody implementation success factors included engagement with local medical providers, therapy batch preparation, placing the infusion center in proximity to emergency services, and creating procedures resilient to EUA changes. Infusion process challenges included confirming patient SARS-CoV-2 positivity, strained staff, scheduling, and pharmacy coordination. Infusion sites are effective when integrated into pre-existing pandemic response ecosystems and can be implemented with limited staff and physical resources.

4.
Ann Epidemiol ; 64: 15-22, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1439847

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In 2015, the Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation (MoHS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) agreed to consolidate data recorded by MoHS and international partners during the Ebola epidemic and create the Sierra Leone Ebola Database (SLED). The primary objectives were helping families to identify the location of graves of their loved ones who died from any cause at the time of the Ebola epidemic and creating a data source for epidemiological research. The Family Reunification Program fulfills the first SLED objective. The purpose of this paper is to describe the Family Reunification Program (Program) development, functioning, and results. METHODS: The MoHS, CDC, SLED Team, and Concern Worldwide developed, tested, and implemented methodology and tools to conduct the Program. Family liaisons were trained in protection of the personally identifiable information. RESULTS: The SLED Family Reunification Program allows families in Sierra Leone, who did not know the final resting place of their loved ones, to be reunited with their graves and to bring them relief and closure. CONCLUSION: Continuing family requests in search of the burial place of loved ones 5 years after the end of the epidemic shows that the emotional burden of losing a family member and not knowing the place of burial does not diminish with time. As of February 2021, the Program continues and is described to allow its replication for other emergency events including COVID-19 and new Ebola outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola , Disease Outbreaks , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sierra Leone/epidemiology
5.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 8(8): ofab398, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364829

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) are a promising treatment for limiting the progression of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and decreasing strain on hospitals. Their use, however, remains limited, particularly in disadvantaged populations. METHODS: Electronic health records were reviewed from SARS-CoV-2 patients at a single medical center in the United States that initiated mAb infusions in January 2021 with the support of the US Department of Health and Human Services' National Disaster Medical System. Patients who received mAbs were compared with untreated patients from the time period before mAb availability who met eligibility criteria for mAb treatment. We used logistic regression to measure the effect of mAb treatment on the risk of hospitalization or emergency department (ED) visit within 30 days of laboratory-confirmed COVID-19. RESULTS: Of 598 COVID-19 patients, 270 (45%) received bamlanivimab and 328 (55%) were untreated. Two hundred thirty-one patients (39%) were Hispanic. Among treated patients, 5/270 (1.9%) presented to the ED or required hospitalization within 30 days of a positive SARS-CoV-2 test, compared with 39/328 (12%) untreated patients (P < .001). After adjusting for age, gender, and comorbidities, the risk of ED visit or hospitalization was 82% lower in mAb-treated patients compared with untreated patients (95% CI, 56%-94%). CONCLUSIONS: In this diverse, real-world COVID-19 patient population, mAb treatment significantly decreased the risk of subsequent ED visit or hospitalization. Broader treatment with mAbs, including in disadvantaged patient populations, can decrease the burden on hospitals and should be facilitated in all populations in the United States to ensure health equity.

6.
Ann Emerg Med ; 78(2): 223-228, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188271

ABSTRACT

Tasked with identifying digital health solutions to support dynamic learning health systems and their response to COVID-19, the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response partnered with the University of New Mexico's Project ECHO and more than 2 dozen other organizations and agencies to create a real-time virtual peer-to-peer clinical education opportunity: the COVID-19 Clinical Rounds Initiative. Focused on 3 "pressure points" in the COVID-19 continuum of care-(1) the out-of-hospital and/or emergency medical services setting, (2) emergency departments, and (3) inpatient critical care environments-the initiative has created a massive peer-to-peer learning network for real-time information sharing, engaging participants in all 50 US states and more than 100 countries. One hundred twenty-five learning sessions had been conducted between March 24, 2020 and February 25, 2021, delivering more than 58,000 total learner-hours of contact in the first 11 months of operation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Emergency Medical Services , Teaching Rounds/methods , Humans , Learning Curve , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL