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1.
Obesity ; 29(SUPPL 2):115, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1616082

ABSTRACT

Background: The negative impacts of COVID-19 are higher in Blacks compared to Whites in the United States (US). Systemic inequities and differences in health behaviors may contribute to COVID-19 disparities. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of COVID-19 stay-at- home orders on health behaviors and anxiety in Blacks and Whites with overweight or obesity (OW/OB). Methods: In April 2020, the COVID-19 Health Behaviors Survey collected demographic information and changes to employment, income, diet (Rapid Eating Assessment for Participants), physical activity (PA;MET-minutes/ week), sleep patterns, and anxiety (General Anxiety Disorder-7) through an online survey. Of the 7753 respondents globally, adults residing in the US and BMI ≥25 kg/m2 were analyzed. Data presented as proportion (%) or Mean ± SD. Analyses were adjusted for baseline characteristics. Significance was set at p < 0.05. Results: Overall, 4008 respondents identified as Black (6.4%) or White (93.6%). Blacks reported being younger (-3.5 years), weighing more (+5.2 kg), single (18.4% greater proportion), and a lower annual income (2.9% lower proportion earning ≥US$50,000/year) compared to Whites (p < 0.004 for all). A greater proportion of Blacks reported being laid off (+13.5%), working fewer hours (+6.7%), and working from home (+4.6%) during COVID-19 stay-at- home orders (p < 0.0001 for all). In the overall sample, eating behaviors improved (+0.1 ± 0.3), PA decreased (-72.0 ± 1417.4 MET-minutes/ week), sleep time extended (+0.3 ± 2.5 hours), and anxiety heightened (+8.9 ± 13.2) during COVID-19 stay-at- home orders (p < 0.01 for all). These findings were universal between Blacks and Whites (p≥0.05 for all). Conclusions: This study highlights the disproportionate employment and income changes in Blacks compared to Whites with OW/OB, with no differential impact on health behaviors and anxiety. As the COVID-19 pandemic persists, disproportionate changes to employment and income may widen among Blacks and Whites, which may influence health behaviors and anxiety.

3.
South African Medical Journal ; 111(6):535-537, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1264653

ABSTRACT

There have recently been safety concerns regarding an increased risk of vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia (VITT) following administration of SARS-CoV-2 adenoviral vector vaccines. The Southern African Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis reviewed the emerging literature on this idiosyncratic complication. A draft document was produced and revised by consensus agreement by a panel of professionals from various specialties. The recommendations were adjudicated by independent international experts to avoid local bias. We present concise, practical guidelines for the clinical management of VITT.

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