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1.
Journal of Clinical Urology ; : 20514158221086137, 2022.
Article in English | Sage | ID: covidwho-1910212

ABSTRACT

Background:Although the technology has been available and several pilot studies have shown success, use of telemedicine has previously been limited in the United States, especially among surgeons. This study aimed to investigate the benefits and obstacles for successful implementation of telemedicine visits in paediatric surgical subspecialties amid the COVID-19 pandemic.Methods:We analysed survey data from telemedicine visits with paediatric surgical subspecialists from May 1 through June 30, 2020 at our paediatric surgery subspecialty clinics. Univariate logistic regression was used to determine associations in survey responses and various demographic factors.Results:There were 164 respondents to the survey. The most frequently cited barrier to care was ability to get time off work (46.3%). Overall satisfaction with the telemedicine visit was 93.8%, and 55.6% responded that they would choose video telemedicine rather than an in-person or telephone visit. Those living at least 25 miles from the hospital had increased odds of indicating interest in using telemedicine for future visits (OR = 2.56, 95% CI = 1.12?5.86, p = 0.026). The average respondent saved between 30 minutes and 1 hour, and 45 minutes using telemedicine.Conclusions:The implementation of telemedicine at our institution in the paediatric surgical subspecialties has proven to be effective and well-received. Given the benefits of time and money saved for families, paired with high satisfaction rates and continued interest, paediatric surgical subspecialists should work to incorporate virtual visits into regular patient care, even well after the COVID-19 pandemic.Level of Evidence:Level IV

2.
Ann Plast Surg ; 88(6): 594-598, 2022 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1494142

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Plastic surgery has traditionally been a specialty that places a strong emphasis on away rotations during the final year of medical school. These rotations allow the program and residency candidates to become better acquainted and are often crucial, as a large portion of applicants match at programs where they rotated. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic forced many institutions to modify their educational curriculums when away rotations were canceled. We present our experience creating and implementing a virtual plastic surgery rotation. METHODS: Our virtual program was designed to mirror the in-person away rotations as much as possible. Prerotation and postrotation surveys from the students as well as feedback interviews with the students, residents, and faculty were used to gather information on the experience. RESULTS: We created a 2-week curriculum including approximately 20 hours of lecture time, 28 hours of operating room time, 2.5 hours of one-on-one mentorship, and 3 hours of social opportunities. Students reported that they learned more about plastic surgery and the residency program, but in contrast to this, some found it difficult to make an impression. CONCLUSIONS: We developed a novel 2-week virtual curriculum that provided visiting medical students from across the country an opportunity to learn more about plastic surgery and our residency program. Virtual learning is becoming a vital part of education, and our study provides pearls and pitfalls when structuring these experiences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Surgery, Plastic , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgery, Plastic/education
3.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 147(6): 1469-1471, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223413

ABSTRACT

SUMMARY: The health care crisis related to the spread of novel coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) has created new challenges to plastic surgery education, mostly because of the decreased volume of procedures. The plastic surgery program directors in Chicago decided to act and identify ways to promote surgical education through citywide, multi-institutional, systematic clinical case discussions. Although the initiative has no impact on the surgical skill of the trainees, it was welcomed by residents and faculty and promoted clinical core knowledge in plastic surgery and collaboration among the institutions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Internship and Residency/organization & administration , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/education , Surgery, Plastic/education , Universities/organization & administration , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Curriculum , Humans , Illinois/epidemiology , Internship and Residency/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data
4.
Ann Plast Surg ; 85(2S Suppl 2): S161-S165, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-537113

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 crisis has brought many unique challenges to the health care system. Across the United States, social distancing measures have been put in place, including stay-at-home (SAH) orders, to combat the spread of this infection. This has impacted the type and volume of traumatic injuries sustained during this time. Meanwhile, steps have been taken in our health care system to assure that adequate resources are available to maintain a high standard of patient care while recognizing the importance of protecting health care providers. Using comparative data, we aim to describe the trends in traumatic injuries managed by our plastic surgery service and detail the changes in consultation policies made to minimize provider exposure. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed of all plastic surgery emergencies at our institution during the 3 weeks preceding the issuance of SAH orders in Chicago and the 3 weeks after. The electronic medical record was queried for patient age, type and mechanism of injury, location where injury was sustained, presence of domestic violence, length of inpatient hospital stays, and treatment rendered. The two 3-week periods were then comparatively analyzed to determine differences and trends in these variables and treatment rendered. The 2 periods were then comparatively analyzed to determine differences and trends in these variables. RESULTS: There was a significant decrease in trauma consults since the issuance of SAH (88 pre-SAH vs 62 post-SAH) with a marked decrease in trauma-related hand injuries. There was an increase in the percentage of assault-related injuries including those associated with domestic violence, whereas there was an overall decrease in motor vehicle collisions. There was no notable change in the location where injuries were sustained. Significantly fewer patients were seen by house staff in the emergency room, whereas those requiring surgical intervention were able to receive care without delay. CONCLUSIONS: Stay-at-home orders in Chicago have impacted traumatic injury patterns seen by the Section of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at a level I Trauma Center. Safe and timely care can continue to be provided with thorough communication, vigilance, and guidance from our colleagues.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Facilities and Services Utilization/trends , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/trends , Trauma Centers/trends , Wounds and Injuries/surgery , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Chicago/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Clinical Protocols , Emergencies , Female , Health Policy , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgery Department, Hospital , United States , Wounds and Injuries/diagnosis , Wounds and Injuries/epidemiology , Wounds and Injuries/etiology , Young Adult
5.
J Am Coll Surg ; 231(2): 205-215, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-382062

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic forced surgeons to reconsider concepts of "elective" operations. Perceptions about the time sensitivity and medical necessity of a procedure have taken on greater significance during the pandemic. The evolving ethical and clinical environment requires reappraisal of perioperative factors, such as personal protective equipment conservation; limiting the risk of exposure to COVID-19 for patients, families, and healthcare workers; preservation of hospital beds and ICU resources; and minimizing COVID-19-related perioperative risk to patients. STUDY DESIGN: A scaffold for the complex decision-making required for prioritization of medically necessary, time-sensitive (MeNTS) operations was developed for adult patients by colleagues at the University of Chicago. Although adult MeNTS scoring can be applied across adult surgical specialties, some variables were irrelevant in a pediatric population. Pediatric manifestations of chronic diseases and congenital anomalies were not accounted for. To account for the unique challenges children face, we modified the adult MeNTS system for use across pediatric subspecialties. RESULTS: This pediatric MeNTS scoring system was applied to 101 cases both performed and deferred between March 23 and April 19, 2020 at the University of Chicago Comer Children's Hospital. The pediatric MeNTS scores provide a safe, equitable, transparent, and ethical strategy to prioritize children's surgical procedures. CONCLUSIONS: This process is adaptable to individual institutions and we project it will be useful during the acute phase of the pandemic (maximal limitations), as well as the anticipated recovery phase.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Decision Making , Elective Surgical Procedures , Infection Control/methods , Operating Rooms , Patient Selection , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Child , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , SARS-CoV-2
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