Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
1.
Psychological well-being and behavioral interactions during the Coronavirus pandemic ; : 58-96, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2278096

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 period emphasized the vulnerability employees and employers face, and was characterized as a traumatic period throughout the world. However, it also accelerated the speed of changes at the workplace, and fundamentally changed the way people work. Practices such as working remotely, virtual Zoom meetings, and virtual Zoom interviews became more popular than ever. The current review aims to map the post-COVID-19 period, and to present several scenarios in the workplace field. The goal of the current review is not to articulate an all-encompassing model of every relevant consideration, but rather to identify some high priority factors in future determinants of employee well-being in the post-COVID-19 period based on the trends and cumulative knowledge gained during the pandemic. The review maps the significant workplace characteristics that may impact employee well-being in post-COVID-19 times such as remote working, job insecurity, unemployment, diversity, and uncertainty. The review suggests that employee well-being would be a dominant area of consideration in the future of the workplace, and provides some practical recommendations to both researchers and practitioners for further examination of future post-COVID-19 times. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

2.
Psychol Rep ; : 332941221144608, 2022 Dec 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2162141

ABSTRACT

Despite government mandates to wear face masks in some public locations, why do some people still refuse to wear a face mask in public? This paper examines the relationship between grit, COVID-19 preventative health measure, and distress. Further, the mediating role of COVID-19 autonomous and controlled motivation is also investigated. The results suggest that grit is directly related to decreased distress and increased preventative behaviors. COVID-19 autonomous and controlled motivated mediated the relationship between grit, distress and preventive behaviors, such that COVID-19 autonomous motivation mediated the association between grit and preventive behaviors; while COVID-19 controlled motivation mediated the relationship between grit and psychological distress. These findings suggest that grit can be an important growth mindset in increasing preventative behaviors and individual well-being during the pandemic. Implications for human resource managers in attempting to help employees cope effectively during the pandemic are discussed.

3.
Psychological well-being and behavioral interactions during the Coronavirus pandemic ; : 58-96, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2111846

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 period emphasized the vulnerability employees and employers face, and was characterized as a traumatic period throughout the world. However, it also accelerated the speed of changes at the workplace, and fundamentally changed the way people work. Practices such as working remotely, virtual Zoom meetings, and virtual Zoom interviews became more popular than ever. The current review aims to map the post-COVID-19 period, and to present several scenarios in the workplace field. The goal of the current review is not to articulate an all-encompassing model of every relevant consideration, but rather to identify some high priority factors in future determinants of employee well-being in the post-COVID-19 period based on the trends and cumulative knowledge gained during the pandemic. The review maps the significant workplace characteristics that may impact employee well-being in post-COVID-19 times such as remote working, job insecurity, unemployment, diversity, and uncertainty. The review suggests that employee well-being would be a dominant area of consideration in the future of the workplace, and provides some practical recommendations to both researchers and practitioners for further examination of future post-COVID-19 times. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

4.
J Bus Res ; 145: 660-670, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751081

ABSTRACT

After the COVID-19 pandemic began, organizations had to pivot and move to online remote work. As companies moved to digital platforms and technologies for remote working, a key concern was the increase in workplace withdrawal behaviors during the pandemic, including cyberloafing, a form of workplace deviance. Cyberloafing can be described as the action of using the internet for non-work-related activities or personal use during working hours. Given its effect on organizational effectiveness and efficiency, organizations must take measures to minimize cyberloafing. We examined how two factors-fear of COVID-19 and intolerance for uncertainty-were related to cyberloafing during the third lockdown in Israel. A sample of 322 adults who were enrolled in professional courses at a university in Israel were surveyed. Based on Conservation of Resources Theory, our findings suggest that distress significantly mediated the relationship between fear of COVID-19, intolerance for uncertainty, and cyberloafing. In an attempt to deal with the stress and depletion of personal resources during the COVID-19 lockdown, individuals engaged in cyberloafing as a way to handle the stress. Our results suggest that organizations should take measures to reduce fear and uncertainty in order to decrease distress, which, in turn, will reduce cyberloafing.

5.
Pers Individ Dif ; 184: 111164, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1331140

ABSTRACT

The present paper examined the contribution of optimism and humor styles to well-being during the COVID-19 lockdown period. Furthermore, we examined whether these direct associations were mediated by two common COVID-19 challenges--work-family interface (WFI) and COVID-19 fears. Israeli employees (N = 356) completed an online survey during lockdown restrictions (69% women, 57.20% held academic degrees, M age = 30.70, age-range = 20-61). Both optimism and adaptive humor revealed a positive and direct effect on well-being. Furthermore, mediation analyses indicated that both fear of COVID-19 and WFI mediated the direct associations between optimism and well-being, as well as the direct associations between maladaptive humor and well-being, whereas WFI mediated the association between adaptive humor and well-being. These findings stress the need to adapt interventions derived from positive psychology to enhance well-being during these challenging times of COVID-19.

6.
Health Care Women Int ; 41(11-12): 1273-1293, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263589

ABSTRACT

After the COVID-19 virus was officially declared a pandemic on March 11, 2020, the Israeli government adopted lockdown restrictions to limit its spread. The purpose of the present article is to examine the impact of this disturbing environment on Israeli women. Specifically, we examined whether fear of the virus would impact the women's distress symptoms, self-rated health (SRH), and marital satisfaction. A total of 130 Israeli married women with children completed the survey during the lockdown restrictions period. All participants reported that their children were living with them during the lockdown, and that no one had been infected by the virus. The results indicated that fear of COVID-19 was negatively associated with SRH as well as marital satisfaction, and positively associated with psychological distress. In addition, psychological distress mediated the link between fear of COVID-19 and both SRH and marital satisfaction. To mitigate similar negative consequences in the future, it is suggested that interventions should focus on the way the crisis is presented in the public domain. In addition, further research is recommended to identify the various indirect consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on psychological, physical, and relational aspects among women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Fear , Marriage/psychology , Personal Satisfaction , Psychological Distress , Adult , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Israel , Mental Health , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Psychol Trauma ; 13(4): 432-437, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065815

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: One of the significant features of the recent lockdown caused by the coronavirus 2019 coronavirus pandemic was the lengthy period of uncertainty that accompanied it. The present study examined a moderated model that links conditions of uncertainty with psychological distress during the coronavirus 2019 lockdown. METHOD: Married parents in Israel (N = 186), all of whom were working at home during the lockdown, completed several measures, including those assessing intolerance of uncertainty (IU), psychological distress, dispositional optimism, and work arrangements at home. RESULTS: Data analysis supported the association between IU and psychological distress. Two additional measures, optimism and work schedule, were found to act as moderators. Whereas optimism buffered IU's negative ramifications, the inability to schedule proper work arrangements at home during the lockdown comprised a risk factor for IU and psychological distress. CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that IU is associated with psychological distress. Theoretical and practical ramifications of the study findings are presented. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control , Psychological Distress , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Uncertainty , Adaptation, Psychological , Female , Humans , Male , Optimism , Pandemics
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL