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1.
Pathogens ; 11(4):460, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1785870

ABSTRACT

Feline coronavirus (FCoV) infections present as one of two forms: a mild or symptom-less enteric infection (FEC) and a fatal systemic disease termed feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). The lack of epidemiology of FCoV in central China and the reason why different symptoms are caused by viruses of the same serotype have motivated this investigation. Clinical data of 81 suspected FIP cases, 116 diarrhea cases and 174 healthy cases were collected from veterinary hospitals using body cavity effusion or fecal samples. Risk factors, sequence comparison and phylogenetic studies were performed. The results indicated that FIPV was distinguished from FECV in the average hydrophobicity of amino acids among the cleavage sites of furin, as well as the mutation sites 23,531 and 23,537. FIPV included a higher minimal R-X-X-R recognition motif of furin (41.94%) than did FECV (9.1%). The serotype of FCoV was insignificantly correlated with FIP, and the clade 1 and clade 2 strains that appeared were unique to central China. Thus, it is hypothesized that this, along with the latent variables of an antigenic epitope at positions 1058 and 1060, as well as mutations at the S1/S2 sites, are important factors affecting FCoV transmission and pathogenicity.

2.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-330278

ABSTRACT

The current pandemic of COVID-19 is fueled by more infectious emergent Omicron variants. Ongoing concerns of emergent variants include possible recombinants, as genome recombination is an important evolutionary mechanism for the emergence and re-emergence of human viral pathogens. Although recombination events among SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoV were well-documented, it has been difficult to detect the recombination signatures in SARS-CoV-2 variants due to their high degree of sequence similarity. In this study, we identified diverse recombination events between two Omicron major subvariants (BA.1 and BA.2) and other variants of concern (VOCs) and variants of interest (VOIs), suggesting that co-infection and subsequent genome recombination play important roles in the ongoing evolution of SARS-CoV-2. Through scanning high-quality completed Omicron spike gene sequences, eighteen core mutations of BA.1 variants (frequency >99%) were identified (eight in NTD, five near the S1/S2 cleavage site, and five in S2). BA.2 variants share three additional amino acid deletions with the Alpha variants. BA.1 subvariants share nine common amino acid mutations (three more than BA.2) in the spike protein with most VOCs, suggesting a possible recombination origin of Omicron from these VOCs. There are three more Alpha-related mutations (del69-70, del144) in BA.1 than BA.2, and therefore BA.1 may be phylogenetically closer to the Alpha variant. Revertant mutations are found in some dominant mutations (frequency >95%) in the BA.1 subvariant. Most notably, multiple additional amino acid mutations in the Delta spike protein were also identified in the recently emerged Omicron isolates, which implied possible recombination events occurred between the Omicron and Delta variants during the on-going pandemic. Monitoring the evolving SARS-CoV-2 genomes especially for recombination is critically important for recognition of abrupt changes to viral attributes including its epitopes which may call for vaccine modifications.

3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-325266

ABSTRACT

Background: Hospitalized patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia showed a severve loss of muscle mass and strength over admission. Therefore, early physical interventions might be conducive to prevent disability and fasten recovery. Methods: : We designed a prospective, randomized controlled trial to identify the effectiveness and safety of pulmonary rehabilitation based on muscle exercise in COVID-19 patients. The study was conducted between February 7 th and March 31 st 2020 in Union Hospital. Patients were randomly assigned to the pulmonary rehabilitation exercise group or the control group. Primary outcome was improvement of activity of daily living (ADL). Secondary outcome was changes of muscle strength assessed by manual muscle test (MMT) and arterial blood gas analysis. Length of hospital staying (LOS) and adverse events related to physical activity were also observed. Results: : A total of sixty patients were in analysis, and thirty patients were in PR group. Patients had a mean age of 54.43±10.57 years. A statistically and clinically significant increase in ADL was observed in PR group (75.00 [66.25,90.00] to 100.00 [100.00,100.00], p<0.001). We also found that the improvement of ADL was related to younger age and higher PaO 2 (p<0.01). Both groups had MMT improvement and there was no statistical difference between groups. There was a significant increase in PaO 2 (80.23±6.49 vs. 90.47±7.82, respectively, p<0.001) between two groups before discharge. There was no statically significant difference in LOS between study group and control group (p=0.62). None of these patients had severe complications during the study. Conclusions: : The protocal of pulmonary rehabilitation based on muscle training exercise was feasible in COVID-19 patients and it might accelerate recovery in ADL as compared with the spontaneous recovery in the control group. Clinical Trial Registration: ChiCTR, ChiCTR2000032457. Registered 29 April 2020- Retrospectively registered, http://www.chictr.org.cn/showproj.aspx?proj=52925.

4.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-319977

ABSTRACT

Background: A year ago, a new type of coronavirus emerged. Once treated for severe and critical COVID-19 infections, patients are discharged from the hospital for further treatment and rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a newly developed comprehensive rehabilitation program based on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in the rehabilitation of patients with severe and critical COVID-19. Methods: : We recruited a total of 72 patients who had suffered from severe and critical COVID-19 infections and were undergoing rehabilitation in Chongqing, China. A comprehensive rehabilitation program was formulated according to the TCM syndromes of these patients. Specific treatments included oral TCM, Baduanjin, Moxibustion, Acupoint application, and foot baths. Prior to the initiation of treatment, and four weeks after the initiation of treatment, we carried out a range of assessments, including the TCM Syndrome curative effect score, the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) dyspnea score, the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire, the Short Form (SF)-36 Quality of Life Scale, and the 6-minute walking test. We also carried out CT scans, serology tests. Statistical analysis was also conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of TCM on severe and critical COVID-19 patients. Results: : Analysis showed that there were significant differences (P < 0.05) when compared before and after four weeks of TCM treatment, in terms of the TCM syndrome curative effect score, mMRC dyspnea score, St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire score, SF-36 Quality of Life Scale score, and the 6-minute walking test. We also identified significant differences (P < 0.05) between these two timepoints, with regards to the neutrophil ratio, lymphoid cell ratio, lymphocytes, platelets, red blood cells, and hemoglobin. There were no significant differences when compared between the two timepoints with regards to white blood cells and neutrophils (P > 0.05). The efficacy of chest CT scans was 83.9%. Logistic regression showed that the CT scans of patients who did not take the TCM decoction did not improve significantly. The higher a patient’s score on the 6-minute walking test, the higher the probability of no significant improvement on the CT scan. Conclusions: A comprehensive rehabilitation program based on TCM improved a number of clinical parameters in patients suffering from severe and critical COVID-19 infections, including quality of life, clinical symptoms, exercise endurance, and respiratory function. TCM also enhanced lymphocytes, lymphocyte ratio, platelet, red blood cell (RBC) count, and hemoglobin content. TCM also appeared to contribute to the absorption of lung lesions.

5.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-308215

ABSTRACT

Background: Serological tests for anti-2019-nCoV antibodies have been developed, however, validation with clinical samples was insufficient and mixed. MethodsA total of 197 patients with COVID-19 hospitalized in the Wuhan Pulmonary Hospital and 114 healthy people were enrolled in this study. The IgM/IgG was measured by chemiluminescence detection kit and the performance of IgM/IgG was assessed through diagnostic test. A smooth spline function was used to fit a possible dynamic changes of antibody content.ResultsThe sensitivity and specificity to diagnose COVID-19 were 96.95% and 92.98% for IgG, and 65.99% and 98.25% for IgM, respectively. The period with the highest IgM positive rate (93.75%) was 11 to 13 days after the onset, while the IgG positive rate was almost 100% in the patients whose serum was collected 7 days after onset. Small differences were found in IgM content among mild/regular, severe and critical patients. IgG content in critical patients were highest in the 2-week post-symptom onset group, while the IgG in the severe patients were highest in the 15-28 days and more than 28 days post-symptom onset.ConclusionsSerological testing performed well in the diagnosis for COVID-19, and the positive rate and variance of IgG are higher than those of IgM.

6.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-306085

ABSTRACT

Researchers across the globe are seeking to rapidly repurpose existing drugs or discover new drugs to counter the the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). One promising approach is to train machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) tools to screen large numbers of small molecules. As a contribution to that effort, we are aggregating numerous small molecules from a variety of sources, using high-performance computing (HPC) to computer diverse properties of those molecules, using the computed properties to train ML/AI models, and then using the resulting models for screening. In this first data release, we make available 23 datasets collected from community sources representing over 4.2 B molecules enriched with pre-computed: 1) molecular fingerprints to aid similarity searches, 2) 2D images of molecules to enable exploration and application of image-based deep learning methods, and 3) 2D and 3D molecular descriptors to speed development of machine learning models. This data release encompasses structural information on the 4.2 B molecules and 60 TB of pre-computed data. Future releases will expand the data to include more detailed molecular simulations, computed models, and other products.

7.
Neural Regen Res ; 17(9): 2029-2035, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1687156

ABSTRACT

Excessive inflammation post-traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) induces microglial activation, which leads to prolonged neurological dysfunction. However, the mechanism underlying microglial activation-induced neuroinflammation remains poorly understood. Ruxolitinib (RUX), a selective inhibitor of JAK1/2, was recently reported to inhibit inflammatory storms caused by SARS-CoV-2 in the lung. However, its role in disrupting inflammation post-SCI has not been confirmed. In this study, microglia were treated with RUX for 24 hours and then activated with interferon-γ for 6 hours. The results showed that interferon-γ-induced phosphorylation of JAK and STAT in microglia was inhibited, and the mRNA expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1ß, interleukin-6, and cell proliferation marker Ki67 were reduced. In further in vivo experiments, a mouse model of spinal cord injury was treated intragastrically with RUX for 3 successive days, and the findings suggest that RUX can inhibit microglial proliferation by inhibiting the interferon-γ/JAK/STAT pathway. Moreover, microglia treated with RUX centripetally migrated toward injured foci, remaining limited and compacted within the glial scar, which resulted in axon preservation and less demyelination. Moreover, the protein expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1ß, and interleukin-6 were reduced. The neuromotor function of SCI mice also recovered. These findings suggest that RUX can inhibit neuroinflammation through inhibiting the interferon-γ/JAK/STAT pathway, thereby reducing secondary injury after SCI and producing neuroprotective effects.

8.
Cureus ; 13(10), 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1525054

ABSTRACT

Background and objective Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the dreaded complications in patients after arthroplasty surgeries, owing to the risk of morbidity and arduous investigations and management associated with it. Nevertheless, as Malaysia is currently battling against the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-induced coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic head-on, the treatment for other non-life-threatening diseases including PJI has taken a backseat. In this study, we present a case series of 11 patients with PJI who were managed surgically at the largest tertiary hospital in Malaysia and we hope to shed some light on the difficulties we have encountered during this trying period. Patients and methods Patients with PJIs who underwent surgical intervention during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic (March 1, 2020, to June 30, 2021) were reviewed and included in this study. The demographic profile of the patients, presenting complaints, prosthesis topography, biochemical investigative findings, surgical interventions, and short-term outcomes were summarized. Results A total of 11 patients were treated surgically at Hospital Kuala Lumpur for PJI. Among them, five patients are still awaiting their second-stage surgeries despite the completion of their antibiotic regimes, and they are fit for the procedure. Conclusion The COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc on the treatment of patients with PJI. In a setting with scarce resources, surgeons should strongly consider single-stage revision surgeries for the treatment of patients with PJI.

9.
J Virol ; 95(16): e0061721, 2021 07 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486509

ABSTRACT

The current pandemic of COVID-19 is caused by a novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The SARS-CoV-2 spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) is the critical determinant of viral tropism and infectivity. To investigate whether naturally occurring RBD mutations during the early transmission phase have altered the receptor binding affinity and infectivity, we first analyzed in silico the binding dynamics between SARS-CoV-2 RBD mutants and the human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor. Among 32,123 genomes of SARS-CoV-2 isolates (December 2019 through March 2020), 302 nonsynonymous RBD mutants were identified and clustered into 96 mutant types. The six dominant mutations were analyzed applying molecular dynamics simulations (MDS). The mutant type V367F continuously circulating worldwide displayed higher binding affinity to human ACE2 due to the enhanced structural stabilization of the RBD beta-sheet scaffold. The MDS also indicated that it would be difficult for bat SARS-like CoV to infect humans. However, the pangolin CoV is potentially infectious to humans. The increased infectivity of V367 mutants was further validated by performing receptor-ligand binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), surface plasmon resonance, and pseudotyped virus assays. Phylogenetic analysis of the genomes of V367F mutants showed that during the early transmission phase, most V367F mutants clustered more closely with the SARS-CoV-2 prototype strain than the dual-mutation variants (V367F+D614G), which may derivate from recombination. The analysis of critical RBD mutations provides further insights into the evolutionary trajectory of early SARS-CoV-2 variants of zoonotic origin under negative selection pressure and supports the continuing surveillance of spike mutations to aid in the development of new COVID-19 drugs and vaccines. IMPORTANCE A novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has caused the pandemic of COVID-19. The origin of SARS-CoV-2 was associated with zoonotic infections. The spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) is identified as the critical determinant of viral tropism and infectivity. Thus, whether mutations in the RBD of the circulating SARS-CoV-2 isolates have altered the receptor binding affinity and made them more infectious has been the research hot spot. Given that SARS-CoV-2 is a novel coronavirus, the significance of our research is in identifying and validating the RBD mutant types emerging during the early transmission phase and increasing human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor binding affinity and infectivity. Our study provides insights into the evolutionary trajectory of early SARS-CoV-2 variants of zoonotic origin. The continuing surveillance of RBD mutations with increased human ACE2 affinity in human or other animals is critical to the development of new COVID-19 drugs and vaccines against these variants during the sustained COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Amino Acid Substitution , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/transmission , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Binding Sites , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Gene Expression , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Kinetics , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Phenylalanine/chemistry , Phenylalanine/metabolism , Phylogeny , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Thermodynamics , Valine/chemistry , Valine/metabolism , Virulence , Virus Attachment
10.
J Nurs Manag ; 2021 Oct 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462860

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To qualitatively explore potential experience among frontline nurses who had been fighting against the COVID-19 infection since the outbreak. BACKGROUND: Disasters are often sudden and uncertain. Since the COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan city, local frontline nurses had been responsible for treatment of COVID-19 for several months. Qualitative study was required to assess complex multi-component psychological experiences among frontline nurses. METHODS: Twenty local frontline nurses were recruited from a designated hospital of COVID-19 treatment. We conducted semi-structured interview using phenomenological method. Descriptive phenomenological method was applied for thematic analysis. RESULTS: Twenty female frontline nurses (aged 24 to 43 years old) were interviewed. Two broader themes, negative and positive, were identified. Negative experience included refusal and helpless (refusal to work at frontline, shortage of confidence in working and helpless), fear and anxiety, excessive miss, and other health issues. Positive experience included improved interpersonal relationship, sublimation of personal faith and strength, changes in understanding meaning of life and new possibility. CONCLUSION: Both positive and negative psychological response were observed, which can provide evidence based clues for making essential strategies and policy. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Understand subjective experience of frontline nurses can establish evidence for development of effective psychological intervention. Nursing administrator should consider the nurses' psychological experience comprehensively to promote psychological growth and lower post-traumatic psychological burden.

11.
Economic Analysis and Policy ; 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1340625

ABSTRACT

This study examined the relationship between the air quality index (AQI), COVID-19, and the oil market using China’s provincial data for the first four months of the pandemic (1 January – 22 April 2020). The results show that air quality improved significantly during this period. Our income and regional group analyses further clarified that the middle-income group and Eastern and Central provinces, which were most affected by COVID-19, showed a more robust relationship between AQI and COVID-19 cases than other Chinese provinces. The national oil market, which saw a 57% decline in the oil price over the period of 13 January to 22 April, was also found to be insignificantly related to AQI. All in all, our paper implies that an improvement in air quality due to a drastic decline in economic activity. We provide some future research directions in the paper.

13.
Microb Cell Fact ; 20(1): 95, 2021 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216899

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) highlights the need to develop safe and effective vaccines with a top priority. Multiple vaccine candidates are under development, and several vaccines are currently available. Efforts need to be undertaken to counter the threat of the global COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: We generated a Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae)-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, EBY100/pYD1-RBD, in which the full-length receptor binding domain (RBD) of the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 was expressed on the surface of yeast. Mice vaccinated orally with unadjuvanted EBY100/pYD1-RBD could produce significant humoral and mucosal responses as well as robust cellular immune responses. Notably, EBY100/pYD1-RBD elicited a mixed Th1/Th2-type cellular immune response with a Th1-biased immune response in a mouse model. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the importance of the RBD as a key target to design and develop vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 and provide evidence of oral administration of a S. cerevisiae-based SARS-CoV-2 vaccine eliciting significant immune responses. Most importantly, the S. cerevisiae surface display system can serve as a universal technology platform and be applied to develop other oral viral or bacterial vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Cellular , Saccharomyces cerevisiae , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Administration, Oral , Animals , Binding Sites , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Immunity, Humoral , Immunity, Mucosal , Mice , Mice, Inbred BALB C
14.
Sci Adv ; 7(6)2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066794

ABSTRACT

The ongoing unprecedented severe acute respiratory syndrome caused by the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak worldwide has highlighted the need for understanding viral-host interactions involved in mechanisms of virulence. Here, we show that the virulence factor Nsp1 protein of SARS-CoV-2 interacts with the host messenger RNA (mRNA) export receptor heterodimer NXF1-NXT1, which is responsible for nuclear export of cellular mRNAs. Nsp1 prevents proper binding of NXF1 to mRNA export adaptors and NXF1 docking at the nuclear pore complex. As a result, a significant number of cellular mRNAs are retained in the nucleus during infection. Increased levels of NXF1 rescues the Nsp1-mediated mRNA export block and inhibits SARS-CoV-2 infection. Thus, antagonizing the Nsp1 inhibitory function on mRNA export may represent a strategy to restoring proper antiviral host gene expression in infected cells.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Gene Expression , Host Microbial Interactions/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Virulence Factors/metabolism , Active Transport, Cell Nucleus/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Nuclear Pore/metabolism , Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins/genetics , Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins/metabolism , RNA, Messenger/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Transfection , Vero Cells , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics
15.
Zhong Nan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 45(10): 1247-1254, 2020 Oct 28.
Article in English, Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-955221

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has become a major outbreak in the world. SARS-CoV-2 infection can not only involve in the respiratory system, but also cause severe nervous system damage. Studies have shown that SRAS-CoV-2 can invade the nervous system through hematogenous and transneuronal pathways, and may cause nervous system damage in patients with COVID-19 by inhibiting cellular immunity, hypoxemia, inflammation, inducing neuronal degeneration and apoptosis, and angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) mechanism. It can lead to intracranial infection, toxic encephalopathy, acute cerebrovascular disease, muscle damage, peripheral nervous system injury, acute myelitis, demyelination disease or other nervous system diseases.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Pneumonia, Viral , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Research , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(45): 28344-28354, 2020 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-887237

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent of the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic that is a serious global health problem. Evasion of IFN-mediated antiviral signaling is a common defense strategy that pathogenic viruses use to replicate and propagate in their host. In this study, we show that SARS-CoV-2 is able to efficiently block STAT1 and STAT2 nuclear translocation in order to impair transcriptional induction of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). Our results demonstrate that the viral accessory protein Orf6 exerts this anti-IFN activity. We found that SARS-CoV-2 Orf6 localizes at the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and directly interacts with Nup98-Rae1 via its C-terminal domain to impair docking of cargo-receptor (karyopherin/importin) complex and disrupt nuclear import. In addition, we show that a methionine-to-arginine substitution at residue 58 impairs Orf6 binding to the Nup98-Rae1 complex and abolishes its IFN antagonistic function. All together our data unravel a mechanism of viral antagonism in which a virus hijacks the Nup98-Rae1 complex to overcome the antiviral action of IFN.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Interferons/metabolism , Nuclear Pore Complex Proteins/metabolism , Nuclear Pore/metabolism , STAT1 Transcription Factor/metabolism , STAT2 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Active Transport, Cell Nucleus , Animals , Binding Sites , Chlorocebus aethiops , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Nuclear Matrix-Associated Proteins/chemistry , Nuclear Matrix-Associated Proteins/metabolism , Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins/chemistry , Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins/metabolism , Protein Binding , Signal Transduction , Vero Cells
17.
SSRN; 2020.
Preprint | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-602

ABSTRACT

Background: Since December 2019, several dozens of ‘pneumonia of unknown origin’ cases, which now came to be known as COVID-19, appeared in Wuhan city, Hubepr

19.
J Med Virol ; 92(10): 1890-1901, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-60287

ABSTRACT

The discovery of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are causing public health emergencies. A handful pieces of literature have summarized its clinical and radiologic features, whereas therapies for COVID-19 are rather limited. To evaluate the efficacy of convalescent plasma therapy in COVID-19 patients, we did this timely descriptive study. Six laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 patients were enrolled and received the transfusion of ABO-compatible convalescent plasma. The efficacy of this intervention was determined by the alleviation of symptoms, changes in radiologic abnormalities and laboratory tests. No obvious adverse effect observed during the treatment. Transfusion of convalescent plasma led to a resolution of ground-glass opacities and consolidation in patients #1, #2, #3, #4, and #6. In patients #1 and #5 who presented with SARS-CoV-2 in throat swab, convalescent plasma therapy elicited an elimination of the virus. Serologic analysis indicated an immediate increase in anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody titers in patients #2 and #3, but not in patient #1. This study indicates that convalescent plasma therapy is effective and specific for COVID-19. This intervention has a special significance for eliminating SARS-CoV-2 and is believed to be a promising state-of-the-art therapy during COVID-19 pandemic crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/blood , China , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Male , Middle Aged
20.
Brain Behav Immun ; 88: 945-946, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-45865
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