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2.
Journal of Agriculture, Food Systems and Community Development ; 11(3):121-137, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1964348

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has unveiled deep and systemic weaknesses and gross inequalities in U.S. food and farming systems, compounding the effects of an already unjust food and agricultural system. Emergent studies reveal disproportionate effects of the pandemic on minority farmers and vulnerable communities, as well as inequitable access to critical relief programs. Less is understood about the experiences and responses of Native American producers, tribal governments, and tribal-led organizations to the COVID-19 crisis. As the nation's primary Native American agriculture and natural resources organization, serving 574 Federally Recognized Tribal communities throughout the United States, the Intertribal Agriculture Council (IAC) received a resounding increase in inquiries during the pandemic pertaining to a number of challenges that tribal producers and governments face. In response, IAC launched a series of national surveys to assess the impacts and needs of Native American producers, tribal governments, and grocery stores in and near tribal communities, with the goal of identifying effective strategies to address tribal priorities in policy and programming. As we continue to learn about the causes and consequences of food system ruptures during the COVID-19 pandemic, it has become abundantly clear that increased investment in and sovereignty over decentralized regional food and farming systems' infrastructure and markets are needed to strengthen the economic viability and resilience of Native American agriculture and food systems.

3.
Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology ; 33(6):S231, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1936899

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To examine the outcomes of patients with venous thromboembolism (VTE) who underwent placement of a bioabsorbable inferior vena cava filter (IVCF) for temporary pulmonary embolism (PE) protection Materials and Methods: From 10/1/2020 to 11/31/2021, 17 patients (mean age 71, range 45-92, 58% female) underwent placement of a bioabsorbable IVCF (Sentry, Boston Scientific) at a single academic center. Thirteen of the 17 filters (76.4%) were placed in the inpatient setting, and the remainder were placed outpatient. VTE risk factors included malignancy (70.6%), immobility (5.9%), COVID-19 (5.9%), and unprovoked (7.6%). Prior to IVCF, 11 patients presented with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) alone, two had PE alone, and four were diagnosed both DVT and PE. The contraindication to anticoagulation (AC) was active bleeding in 47.1% of the cohort, upcoming surgery in 41.2%, worsening of DVT on AC in 5.9%. and brain tumor in 5.9%. The pre-implantation infrarenal IVC diameter ranged from 1.6 to 2.6 cm. Technical success (TS), adverse events (AEs), and follow-up IVCF characteristics were recorded. Results: TS was 100%. No AEs occurred during placement. Mean follow-up period was 4.9 months (range 0-12.9). No new PEs were diagnosed after IVCF placement, and no patients required replacement of IVCF. Nine of the 17 patients had follow-up CTs after filter placement, two had follow up radiographs in which the filter state could be assessed, and the remaining six had no imaging evaluating the filter after placement. Asymptomatic IVCF associated non-occlusive thrombosis was seen in 3 patients. The longest amount of time after placement that a Sentry filter was observed to still be in the filter state was 3.9 months, and the shortest time in which imaging showed a filter bio-converted to the open state was 3.1 months. Three patients underwent serial imaging which incidentally demonstrated the timeframe in which the IVCF converted from a filter-state to an open-state. In one patient this conversion occurred between 2.1 and 3.1 months, in another between 1.7 and 3.3 months, and in the last patient between 3.9 and 4.4 months. Conclusion: In VTE patients with either a temporary contraindication to anticoagulation or a transitory high-PE-risk period, bioconvertible IVC filters are a safe and effective option for short-term protection against pulmonary embolism.

4.
IEEE IAS Electrical Safety Workshop (ESW) ; 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1459025

ABSTRACT

The electrical industry has greatly evolved over the past several decades. Originally, there was no such thing as a "safety culture". Now, hundreds of the industry's leading minds show up annually for a full week to learn, listen, and exchange ideas for stopping electrical incidents and injuries in the workplace. Under normal operations, most companies have adopted the " Safety First" mantra. In 2020, the world was faced with something it had never seen before;a modern-day pandemic. This completely changed the way that we here in the United States were able to conduct business. When circumstances change so rapidly even on a day to day basis and people's businesses and the ability to support their families are put on the line, is safety still first? In this paper, we will discuss the struggles of operating a business and keeping employees as safe as possible during the 2020 SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) (COVID-19) Pandemic. We linked with other professionals and centers of excellence from around the world in the electrical sector to advance our mission of a Safety-First culture. The innovations required involved human performance best practices to overcome these substantial barriers to everyday work tasks. The US Department of Homeland Security deemed the Energy Sector as critically essential. They stated, "The U.S. energy infrastructure fuels the economy of the 21st century. Without a stable energy supply, health and welfare are threatened, and the U.S. economy cannot function [1]." The electrical industry could not shut down in this crisis. Our industry needed to adapt, in real-time, to the environments they were in. Engineers, technicians, and electricians dealt daily with this new hazard that they could not see, interestingly not unlike electricity. The ongoing respect for electricity that our employees have always had, along with the ability to adapt quickly in innovative ways made it possible to still provide this essential work to keep the country moving.

5.
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control ; 10(SUPPL 1), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1448308

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Implementation of a validated twinning partnership approach with clear objectives while maintaining flexibility of inputs and activities during a pandemic, can yield improvements in IPC as a cornerstone of quality of care. Objectives: To apply the World Health Organisation (WHO) TPI 6-step model to guide twinning partners through a systematic process to drive quality of care in health settings. Methods: A partnership between Macau Health Bureau and Timor-Leste Cabinet of Quality Assurance in Health was initiated, guided by WHO's TPI objectives and 6-step model. The 2-year TPI included partnership formation, a situational analysis, co-developing a quality improvement (QI) action plan, joint implementation of action and bi-directional learning. IPC at the national, subnational and facility level was as prioritized by the partnership. Three Timor-Leste facilities were chosen for IPC improvements. The WHO IPC assessment framework at the facility level (IPCAF) was used to gather data at baseline and at intervals over the 2-year TPI. Results: Based on the IPCAF results, the action plan focused on 4 areas: 1) establishing IPC team in each of the facilities;2) training and capacity building in standard precautions;3) facility infrastructure improvements (including water sanitation and hygiene);and 4) hand hygiene advocacy. The structured TPI methodology and direct partner support resulted in clean water being consistently available at the 3 facilities and capacity building in standard precautions, transmission-based precautions and PPE. COVID-19 realities required adaptation and re-scheduled infrastructure and training activities. Conclusion: Implementation of the partnership plan using the structured TPI approach catalyzed IPC improvements at the three facilities and beyond. Although COVID-19 required adjustment of activities, a robust QI plan supported innovation, flexibility and commitment. Lessons from the experience can be applied to other twinning partnerships.

7.
2021 IEEE IAS Electrical Safety Workshop, ESW 2021 ; 2021-March, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1373734

ABSTRACT

The electrical industry has greatly evolved over the past several decades. Originally, there was no such thing as a 'safety culture'. Now, hundreds of the industry's leading minds show up annually for a full week to learn, listen, and exchange ideas for stopping electrical incidents and injuries in the workplace. Under normal operations, most companies have adopted the 'Safety First' mantra. In 2020, the world was faced with something it had never seen before;a modern-day pandemic. This completely changed the way that we here in the United States were able to conduct business. When circumstances change so rapidly even on a day to day basis and people's businesses and the ability to support their families are put on the line, is safety still first? In this paper, we will discuss the struggles of operating a business and keeping employees as safe as possible during the 2020 SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) (COVID-19) Pandemic. We linked with other professionals and centers of excellence from around the world in the electrical sector to advance our mission of a Safety-First culture. The innovations required involved human performance best practices to overcome these substantial barriers to everyday work tasks. The US Department of Homeland Security deemed the Energy Sector as critically essential. They stated, 'The U.S. energy infrastructure fuels the economy of the 21st century. Without a stable energy supply, health and welfare are threatened, and the U.S. economy cannot function [1].' The electrical industry could not shut down in this crisis. Our industry needed to adapt, in real-time, to the environments they were in. Engineers, technicians, and electricians dealt daily with this new hazard that they could not see, interestingly not unlike electricity. The ongoing respect for electricity that our employees have always had, along with the ability to adapt quickly in innovative ways made it possible to still provide this essential work to keep the country moving. © 2021 IEEE.

8.
Clinical Infectious Diseases ; 71(11):2976-2980, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1059931

ABSTRACT

In early-to-mid March 2020, 20 of 46 (43%) COVID-19 cases at a tertiary care hospital in San Francisco, California were travel related. Cases were significantly associated with travel to either Europe (odds ratio, 6.1) or New York (odds ratio, 32.9). Viral genomes recovered from 9 of 12 (75%) cases co-clustered with lineages circulating in Europe.

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