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1.
Journal of Travel Research ; 62(5):969-988, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20239306

ABSTRACT

When people make travel decisions, they consult their imagination, considering how they would feel in the respective travel situation. Both, researchers who examine this phenomenon and practitioners executing it, commonly hold the vague assumption of an evaluative cognitive process that enables tourists to factor such information into their decision-making process. The nature and functioning of such a process is largely unknown. The authors suggest that travelers, often subconsciously, mentally simulate future hotel stays and predict future feelings to inform their decision-making, a process referred to as affective forecasting. Executing an experimental design, the authors show that actively engaging in episodic future thinking to trigger affective forecasting increases travelers' intentions toward holiday accommodations. This effect is mediated by hotel trust and risk perception, demonstrating that affective forecasting is an effective way for regaining tourists' trust and reducing their perceived risk during a pandemic. Contributions to theory and practical implications are discussed.

2.
Social Science Open Access Repository; 2020.
Non-conventional in English | Social Science Open Access Repository | ID: grc-748140

ABSTRACT

The paper examines which travel risks are more salient for tourists' destination choice. We develop and test an integrated travel decision risk typology with survey data from 835 potential tourists. Specifically, we explore the interplay of risk types, tourist attributes and destination characteristics. We examine if travel risks linked to nature, health, terrorism, criminality, political instability are more salient for tourists' destination choice - and how risk perceptions influence tourist’s in the key stages of the decision-making process. Results offer an important baseline for future studies in the post-COVID-19 phase. First, our integrated travel decision risk typology distinguishes between sociodemographic, psychological and travel-related factors. We show that past travel experience shapes risk perceptions and impacts tourists' future destination choice. Second, we reveal that natural disasters are not the key barrier in the early decision-making stage of the destination choice process. Third, we identify tourist segments that are resilient to certain risks. We conclude with implications for the tourism practice with recommendations on how to manage travel risk and decision-making behaviours in the (post-)COVID-19 phase.

3.
Tourism Management ; 87:104374, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1271798

ABSTRACT

This study takes a processual view of resilience to investigate how tourism organisations utilise dynamic capabilities to develop resilience in a disaster context. A longitudinal qualitative research design was used to gain insights into the process. The study uses on-site observation, secondary documents, and in-depth interviews with representatives from 25 tourism organisations and industry stakeholders across two years to provide a longitudinal understanding of disaster resilience. A dynamic resilience framework is developed based on three dynamic capability steps (sensing, seizing, transforming) and helps to explain how tourism organisations develop resilience elements at each disaster management stage. Two notable contributions include (i) a new resilience element added to the existing list of resilience development, which illustrates disruptive changes of tourism facilitated by transforming dynamic capabilities, and (ii) a trial-and-error process used by tourism organisations to improve decision-making for future disaster events. These help to explain the cyclical nature of resilience building.

4.
Annals of Tourism Research ; 87:103139, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1039270

ABSTRACT

People mentally simulate future events, visualise themselves in these events, and then make predictions about how they would feel. This process is referred to as affective forecasting. Tourism lends itself toward affective forecasting because holiday experiences are not tangible and difficult to judge upfront. The authors conceptualise and empirically examine the mental simulation and affective forecasting in tourist decision-making. Using the COVID-19 pandemic as a proof of concept, they employ an experimental research design to demonstrate that affective forecasting can mitigate risk perceptions and travel decision-making in times of a pandemic. The findings highlight how affective forecasting can be leveraged to predict and change travel behaviour in the aftermath of pandemics, though implications reach beyond this context.

5.
Tourism Management ; : 104261, 2020.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-922146

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has generated an unprecedented level of public fear, likely impeding tourism industry recovery after the pandemic is over. This study explores what trigger the public’s pandemic ‘travel fear’ and how people impose self-protection, coping and resilience related to travel. The study integrates theories including protection motivation theory, coping and resilience theories to address the research aim. Using a quota sampling, an online survey of 1208 respondents across mainland China was conducted. Results found that threat severity and susceptibility can cause ‘travel fear’, which leads to protection motivation and protective travel behaviors after the pandemic outbreak. Findings also revealed that ‘travel fear’ can evoke different coping strategies, which increases people’s psychological resilience and adoption of cautious travel behaviors. Several strategies are provided on how to mitigate people’s ‘travel fear’ and encourage travel in a post-COVID-19 world.

6.
J. Destin. Mark. Manage. ; - (18):100487, 2020.
Article | ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-773511

ABSTRACT

The paper examines which travel risks are more salient for tourists' destination choice. An integrated travel-decision risk typology with survey data from 835 potential tourists is developed and tested. Specifically, this paper explores the interplay of risk types, tourist attributes and destination characteristics. It examines if travel risks linked to nature, health, terrorism, criminality, political instability are more salient for tourists' destination choice, and how risk perceptions influence tourists in the key stages of the decision-making process. Results offer an important baseline for future studies in the post-COVID-19 phase. First, the integrated travel-decision risk typology distinguishes between sociodemographic, psychological and travel-related factors. It shows that past travel experience shapes risk perceptions and impacts tourists’ future destination choice. Second, the study reveals that natural hazards are not the key barrier in the early decision-making stage of the destination choice process. Third, tourist segments that are resilient to certain risks are identified. This paper concludes with implications for the tourism practice with recommendations on how to manage travel risk and decision-making behaviours in the post-COVID-19 phase.

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