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1.
Transpl Infect Dis ; 23(4): e13696, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319361

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since phase III trials for the most prominent vaccines excluded immunocompromised or immunosuppressed patients, data on safety and efficacy of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines for recipients of solid organ transplantations are scarce. AIMS: Our study offers a synthesis of expert opinions aligned with available data addressing key questions of the clinical management of SARS-CoV-2 vaccinations for transplant patients. METHOD: An online research was performed retrieving available recommendations by national and international transplantation organizations and state institutions on SARS-CoV2 vaccination management for transplant recipients. RESULTS: Eleven key statements were identified from recommendations by 18 national and international societies, and consensus for the individual statements was evaluated by means of the Society Recommendation Consensus score. The highest consensus level (SRC A) was found for prioritized access to vaccination for transplant patients despite anticipation of a weakened immune response. All currently authorized vaccines can be considered safe for transplant patients (SRC A). The handling of immunosuppressive medication, the timely management of vaccines, and other aspects were aligned with available expert opinions. CONCLUSION: Expert consensus can be determined for crucial aspects of the implementation of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination programs. We hereby offer a tool for immediate decision-making until empirical data becomes available.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Consensus , Humans , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
2.
J Clin Med ; 10(13)2021 Jun 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288913

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic challenges international and national healthcare systems. In the field of thoracic surgery, procedures may be deferred due to mandatory constraints of the access to diagnostics, staff and follow-up facilities. There is a lack of prospective data on the management of benign and malignant thoracic conditions in the pandemic. Therefore, we derived recommendations from 14 thoracic societies to address key questions on the topic of COVID-19 in the field of thoracic surgery. Respective recommendations were extracted and the degree of consensus among different organizations was calculated. A high degree of consensus was found to temporarily suspend non-critical elective procedures or procedures for benign conditions and to prioritize patients with symptomatic or advanced cancer. Prior to hospitalization, patients should be screened for respiratory symptoms indicating possible COVID-19 infection and most societies recommended to screen all patients for COVID-19 prior to admission. There was a weak consensus on the usage of serology tests and CT scans for COVID-19 diagnostics. Nearly all societies suggested to postpone elective procedures in patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 and recommended constant reevaluation of these patients. Additionally, we summarized recommendations focusing on precautions in the theater and the management of chest drains. This study provides a novel approach to informed guidance for thoracic surgeons during the COVID-19 pandemic in the absence of scientific evidence-based data.

3.
Zentralbl Chir ; 146(1): e1-e6, 2021 Jan.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724353

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The new COVID-19 pandemic has an impact on routine thoracic surgery. Various concepts and recommendations are being pursued to protect patients and hospital staff. However, the implementation of these recommendations may depend on the existing infrastructure, local conditions and in-house procedural instructions. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Between 11th May and 26th May 2020, an anonymous online survey on the topic of COVID-19 was conducted among thoracic surgeons in Germany. The survey consisted of 16 questions on the local COVID-19 case numbers, protective measures, procedural instructions and treatment concepts. The results were summarised, descriptively analysed and discussed. RESULTS: The response rate of 42.6% (n = 66), included replies from 23 (34.8%) specialised hospitals, 18 (27.3%) maximum care hospitals and 14 (21.2%) university clinics. COVID-19-positive patients were treated in 65 (99%) clinics and 37.9% of the clinics also performed surgery on COVID-19-positive patients. Nasopharyngeal swabs were the main instrument for COVID-19 patient testing (in 95.4% of the clinics). Test results influenced decisions on treatment in 71.2% of the clinics. In 59.1% of clinics, safety equipment was supplemented with FFP2 masks and eye protection during thoracic surgeries due to the COVID-19 pandemic. DISCUSSION: Almost all thoracic surgeons reported that they had treated patients with COVID-19 and half of them also had performed surgery on COVID-19-positive patients. The applied procedural instructions as well as the effects of COVID-19 on treatment decisions and patient-doctor contact differed between the reporting clinics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Thoracic Surgery , Germany , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Clin Med ; 9(6)2020 Jun 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-603147

ABSTRACT

Health care systems worldwide have been facing major challenges since the outbreak of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Kidney transplantation (KT) has been tremendously affected due to limited personal protective equipment (PPE) and intensive care unit (ICU) capacities. To provide valid information on risk factors for ICU admission in a high-risk cohort of old kidney recipients from old donors in the Eurotransplant Senior Program (ESP), we retrospectively conducted a bi-centric analysis. Overall, 17 (16.2%) patients out of 105 KTs were admitted to the ICU. They had a lower BMI, and both coronary artery disease (CAD) and hypertensive nephropathy were more frequent. A risk model combining BMI, CAD and hypertensive nephropathy gained a sensitivity of 94.1% and a negative predictive value of 97.8%, rendering it a valuable search test, but with low specificity (51.1%). ICU admission also proved to be an excellent parameter identifying patients at risk for short patient and graft survivals. Patients admitted to the ICU had shorter patient (1-year 57% vs. 90%) and graft (5-year 49% vs. 77%) survival. To conclude, potential kidney recipients with a low BMI, CAD and hypertensive nephropathy should only be transplanted in the ESP in times of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic if the local health situation can provide sufficient ICU capacities.

5.
Am J Transplant ; 20(7): 1826-1836, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-108935

ABSTRACT

The ongoing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has a drastic impact on national health care systems. Given the overwhelming demand on facility capacity, the impact on all health care sectors has to be addressed. Solid organ transplantation represents a field with a high demand on staff, intensive care units, and follow-up facilities. The great therapeutic value of organ transplantation has to be weighed against mandatory constraints of health care capacities. In addition, the management of immunosuppressed recipients has to be reassessed during the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. In addressing these crucial questions, transplant physicians are facing a total lack of scientific evidence. Therefore, the aim of this study was to offer an approach of consensus-based guidance, derived from individual information of 22 transplant societies. Key recommendations were extracted and the degree of consensus among different organizations was calculated. A high degree of consensus was found for temporarily suspending nonurgent transplant procedures and living donation programs. Systematic polymerase chain reaction-based testing of donors and recipients was broadly recommended. Additionally, more specific aspects (eg, screening of surgical explant teams and restricted use of marginal donor organs) were included in our analysis. This study offers a novel approach to informed guidance for health care management when a priori no scientific evidence is available.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Organ Transplantation/standards , Organ Transplantation/trends , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Critical Care , Evidence-Based Medicine , Health Policy , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Internationality , Living Donors , Organ Transplantation/methods , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Radiography, Thoracic , Resource Allocation , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Tissue Donors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Transplant Recipients
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