Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
J Clin Med ; 11(19)2022 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066201

ABSTRACT

Lenalidomide-based regimens are effective treatment options for patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM). However, they are associated with an increased risk of infectious complications. This study examines the clinical factors influencing the occurrence of infection in MM patients treated with lenalidomide and dexamethasone (Rd). A retrospective analysis of all patients who received the Rd regimen between 2017 and 2021 at our institution was performed. The study group consisted of 174 patients and the median age was 65 years. Most patients (n = 110, 63.2%) received the Rd treatment in second-line treatment. The majority of patients (64.3%) received bortezomib-based regimens in the first line of treatment. The median progression-free survival was 12.6 (95% CI: 9.5-16.2) months, and the median overall survival was 22.3 (95% CI: 15.9-28.6) months. The overall response rate was 64.1%, 12.7% of patients achieved complete response, and 20.4% had a very good partial response. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, hypoalbuminemia (OR 4.2, 95% CI: 1.6-11.2, p = 0.0039), autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) before Rd (OR 2.6, 95% CI: 1.0-6.7, p = 0.048), and anemia grade ≥3 (OR 5.0, 95% CI: 1.8-14.0, p = 0.002) were independent factors related to the occurrence of infections. In conclusion, in this large cohort of RRMM patients, AHSCT before Rd regimen therapy, hypoalbuminemia, and anemia during treatment were identified as three independent factors influencing the frequency of infections during Rd therapy. Patients with established risk factors may benefit from optimal supportive therapy.

2.
Lancet Oncol ; 23(8): 1031-1043, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1926992

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Zanubrutinib is a next-generation, selective Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor with efficacy in relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and small lymphocytic lymphoma (SLL). We compared zanubrutinib with bendamustine-rituximab to determine its effectiveness as frontline therapy in patients with CLL or SLL. METHODS: We conducted an open-label, multicentre, phase 3 study at 153 academic or community hospitals in 14 countries and regions. Eligible patients had untreated CLL or SLL requiring treatment as per International Workshop on CLL criteria; were aged 65 years or older, or 18 years or older and had comorbidities; and had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status score of 0-2. A central interactive web response system randomly assigned patients without del(17)(p13·1) to zanubrutinib (group A) or bendamustine-rituximab (group B) by sequential block method (permutated blocks with a random block size of four). Patients with del(17)(p13·1) were enrolled in group C and received zanubrutinib. Zanubrutinib was administered orally at 160 mg twice per day (28-day cycles); bendamustine at 90 mg/m2 of body surface area on days 1 and 2 for six cycles plus rituximab at 375 mg/m2 of body surface area the day before or on day 1 of cycle 1, and 500 mg/m2 of body surface area on day 1 of cycles 2-6, were administered intravenously. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival per independent review committee in the intention-to-treat population in groups A and B, with minimum two-sided α of 0·05 for superiority. Safety was analysed in all patients who received at least one dose of study treatment. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03336333, and is closed to recruitment. FINDINGS: Between Oct 31, 2017, and July 22, 2019, 590 patients were enrolled; patients without del(17)(p13·1) were randomly assigned to zanubrutinib (group A; n=241) or bendamustine-rituximab (group B; n=238). At median follow-up of 26·2 months (IQR 23·7-29·6), median progression-free survival per independent review committee was not reached in either group (group A 95% CI not estimable [NE] to NE; group B 28·1 months to NE). Progression-free survival was significantly improved in group A versus group B (HR 0·42 [95% CI 0·28 to 0·63]; two-sided p<0·0001). The most common grade 3 or worse adverse event was neutropenia (27 [11%] of 240 patients in group A, 116 [51%] of 227 in group B, and 17 [15%] of 111 patients in group C). Serious adverse events occurred in 88 (37%) of 240 patients in group A, 113 (50%) of 227 patients in group B, and 45 (41%) of 111 patients in group C. Adverse events leading to death occurred in 11 (5%) of 240 patients in group A, 12 (5%) of 227 patients in group B, and three (3%) of 111 patients in group C, most commonly due to COVID-19 (four [2%] of 240 patients in group A), diarrhoea, and aspiration pneumonia (two each [1%] of 227 patients in group B). INTERPRETATION: Zanubrutinib significantly improved progression-free survival versus bendamustine-rituximab, with an acceptable safety profile consistent with previous studies. These data support zanubrutinib as a potential new treatment option for untreated CLL and SLL. FUNDING: BeiGene.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell , Sequoia , Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Bendamustine Hydrochloride , Humans , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/drug therapy , Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell/pathology , Piperidines , Pyrazoles , Pyrimidines , Rituximab
3.
Cancers (Basel) ; 14(3)2022 Feb 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674510

ABSTRACT

The use of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors has changed the management and clinical history of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). BTK is a critical molecule that interconnects B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling. BTKis are classified into two categories: irreversible (covalent) inhibitors and reversible (non-covalent) inhibitors. Ibrutinib was the first irreversible BTK inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2013 as a breakthrough therapy in CLL patients. Subsequently, several studies have evaluated the efficacy and safety of new agents with reduced toxicity when compared with ibrutinib. Two other irreversible, second-generation BTK inhibitors, acalabrutinib and zanubrutinib, were developed to reduce ibrutinib-mediated adverse effects. Additionally, new reversible BTK inhibitors are currently under development in early-phase studies to improve their activity and to diminish adverse effects. This review summarizes the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, safety, dosing, and drug-drug interactions associated with the treatment of CLL with BTK inhibitors and examines their further implications.

4.
Curr Opin Oncol ; 33(5): 412-419, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364850

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article provides a brief update on the recommended diagnosis and treatment strategies for patients with the classic form of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) and HCL variant (HCLv). RECENT FINDINGS: HCL is a chronic B-cell malignancy with multiple treatment options. In recent years, many novel drugs have been assessed for HCL treatment with promising results. The investigated nonchemotherapy options include moxetumomab pasudotox, which targets CD22; vemurafenib or dabrafenib, which target the BRAFV600E protein; trametinib, which targets mitogen-activated protein kinase enzyme; and ibrutinib, which targets Bruton tyrosine kinase. SUMMARY: Purine analogs significantly improve survival in patients with HCL. However, patients often relapse, require multiple treatments, and may become refractory. The introduction of novel agents has expanded the spectrum of therapy possibilities in those patients. In the coming years, they will assist standard therapy for patients with HCL who may currently have suboptimal results.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents , Leukemia, Hairy Cell , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Leukemia, Hairy Cell/drug therapy , Recurrence
5.
Leukemia ; 35(7): 1864-1872, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216445

ABSTRACT

Standard treatment options in classic HCL (cHCL) result in high response rates and near normal life expectancy. However, the disease itself and the recommended standard treatment are associated with profound and prolonged immunosuppression, increasing susceptibility to infections and the risk for a severe course of COVID-19. The Hairy Cell Leukemia Foundation (HCLF) has recently convened experts and discussed different clinical strategies for the management of these patients. The new recommendations adapt the 2017 consensus for the diagnosis and management with cHCL to the current COVID-19 pandemic. They underline the option of active surveillance in patients with low but stable blood counts, consider the use of targeted and non-immunosuppressive agents as first-line treatment for cHCL, and give recommendations on preventive measures against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Leukemia, Hairy Cell/therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Consensus , Humans , Leukemia, Hairy Cell/complications , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Expert Opin Pharmacother ; 22(5): 565-582, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990388

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Patients with hematological malignancies have experienced a more severe clinical course of COVID-19 and higher mortality than those with solid tumors and those without cancer. The ongoing pandemic poses many challenges in assuring the correct and timely diagnosis of hemato-oncology patients as well as the optimal treatment.Areas covered: The present paper reviews current data on the incidence and clinical course of COVID-19 in patients with hematological malignancies. A literature review of the MEDLINE database for articles was conducted via PubMed. Publications from December 2019 through September 2020 were scrutinized. The search terms used were SARS-Cov-2 OR COVID-19 in conjunction with hematological malignancies OR leukemia OR lymphoma OR multiple myeloma OR cancer. Recommendations and expert opinions either published or presented on ASH, ASCO, ESMO, NCCN websites were also reviewed.Expert opinion: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought a pressing need to improve the management of patients with hematological malignancies, including establishing prompt diagnoses and providing effective treatment while also minimalizing the risk of SARS-Cov2 infection. The recommendations developed by many organizations based on expert opinions are helpful in making proper decisions. All cancer patients should be advised to get vaccinated against influenza and pneumococcus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hematologic Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Pandemics
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL