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1.
Curr Med Chem ; 2021 Sep 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862442

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The digestive tract represents an interface between the external environment and the body where the interaction of a complex polymicrobial ecology has an important influence on health and disease. The physiological mechanisms that are altered during the hospitalization and in the intensive care unit (ICU) contribute to the pathobiota's growth. Intestinal dysbiosis occurs within hours of being admitted to ICU. This may be due to different factors, such as alterations of normal intestinal transit, administration of variuos medications or alterations in the intestinal wall which causes a cascade of events that will lead to the increase of nitrates and decrease of oxygen concentration, liberation of free radicals. OBJECTIVE: This work aims to report the latest updates on the microbiota's contribution to developing sepsis in patients in the ICU department. In this short review were reviewed the latest scientific findings on the mechanisms of intestinal immune defenses performed both locally and systemically. In addition, we considered it necessary to review the literature to report the current best treatment strategies to prevent the infection spread which can bring systemic infections in patients admitted to ICU. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This review has been written to answer at three main questions: what are the main intestinal flora's defense mechanisms that help us to prevent the risk of developing systemic diseases on a day-to-day basis? What are the main dysbiosis' systemic abnormalities? What are the modern strategies that are used in the ICU patients to prevent the infection spread? Using the combination of following keywords: microbiota and ICU, ICU and gut, microbiota and critical illness, microbiota and critical care, microbiota and sepsis, microbiota and infection, gastrointestinal immunity,in the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Library, medline and pubmed, google scholar, ovid/wiley. Finally, we reviewed and selected 72 articles. We also consulted the site ClinicalTrials.com to find out studies that are recently conducted or ongoing. RESULTS: The critical illness can alter intestinal bacterial flora leading to homeostasis disequilibrium. Despite numerous mechanisms, such as epithelial cells with calciform cells that together build a mechanical barrier for pathogenic bacteria, the presence of mucous associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) which stimulates an immune response through the production of interferon-gamma (IFN-y) and THN-a or by stimulating lymphocytes T helper-2 produces anti-inflammatory cytokines. But these defenses can be altered following a hospitalization in ICU and lead to serious complications such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), health care associated pneumonia (HAP) and ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP), Systemic infection and multiple organ failure (MOF), but also in the development of coronary artery disease (CAD). In addition, the microbiota has a significant impact on the development of intestinal complications and the severity of the SARS-COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSION: The microbiota is recognized as one of the important factors that can worsen the clinical conditions of patients who are already very frailty in intensive care unit. At the same time, the microbiota also plays a crucial role in the prevention of ICU associated complications. By using the resources, we have available, such as probiotics, symbiotics or fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), we can preserve the integrity of the microbiota and the GUT, which will later help maintain homeostasis in ICU patients.

2.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 236, 2021 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854835

ABSTRACT

Infectious diseases may affect brain function and cause encephalopathy even when the pathogen does not directly infect the central nervous system, known as infectious disease-associated encephalopathy. The systemic inflammatory process may result in neuroinflammation, with glial cell activation and increased levels of cytokines, reduced neurotrophic factors, blood-brain barrier dysfunction, neurotransmitter metabolism imbalances, and neurotoxicity, and behavioral and cognitive impairments often occur in the late course. Even though infectious disease-associated encephalopathies may cause devastating neurologic and cognitive deficits, the concept of infectious disease-associated encephalopathies is still under-investigated; knowledge of the underlying mechanisms, which may be distinct from those of encephalopathies of non-infectious cause, is still limited. In this review, we focus on the pathophysiology of encephalopathies associated with peripheral (sepsis, malaria, influenza, and COVID-19), emerging therapeutic strategies, and the role of neuroinflammation.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/complications , Cytokines/immunology , Influenza, Human/complications , Malaria/complications , Sepsis/complications , Blood-Brain Barrier/immunology , Brain Diseases/prevention & control , COVID-19/immunology , Humans , Influenza, Human/immunology , Malaria/immunology , Sepsis/immunology
3.
Front Neurol ; 13: 814405, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834475

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Neurological complications are frequent in patients with coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). The use of non-invasive neuromonitoring in subjects without primary brain injury but with potential neurological derangement is gaining attention outside the intensive care unit (ICU). This systematic review and meta-analysis investigates the use of non-invasive multimodal neuromonitoring of the brain in non-critically ill patients with COVID-19 outside the ICU and quantifies the prevalence of abnormal neuromonitoring findings in this population. Methods: A structured literature search was performed in MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane, and EMBASE to investigate the use of non-invasive neuromonitoring tools, including transcranial doppler (TCD); optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD); near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS); pupillometry; and electroencephalography (EEG) inpatients with COVID-19 outside the ICU. The proportion of non-ICU patients with CVOID-19 and a particular neurological feature at neuromonitoring at the study time was defined as prevalence. Results: A total of 6,593 records were identified through literature searching. Twenty-one studies were finally selected, comprising 368 non-ICU patients, of whom 97 were considered for the prevalence of meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of electroencephalographic seizures, periodic and rhythmic patterns, slow background abnormalities, and abnormal background on EEG was.17 (95% CI 0.04-0.29), 0.42 (95% CI 0.01-0.82), 0.92 (95% CI 0.83-1.01), and.95 (95% CI 0.088-1.09), respectively. No studies investigating NIRS and ONSD outside the ICU were found. The pooled prevalence for abnormal neuromonitoring findings detected using the TCD and pupillometry were incomputable due to insufficient data. Conclusions: Neuromonitoring tools are non-invasive, less expensive, safe, and bedside available tools with a great potential for both diagnosis and monitoring of patients with COVID-19 at risk of brain derangements. However, extensive literature searching reveals that they are rarely used outside critical care settings.Systematic Review Registration: www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?RecordID=265617, identifier: CRD42021265617.

4.
Infect Dis Ther ; 11(3): 1149-1160, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1783017

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Candida auris (C. auris) is an emerging nosocomial pathogen, and a sharp rise in cases of colonization and infection has been registered in intensive care units (ICUs) during the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The unfavorable resistance profile of C. auris and the potential high mortality of C. auris infections represent an important challenge for physicians. METHODS: We conducted a single-center retrospective study including all patients admitted to ICUs with isolation of C. auris in any non-sterile body site between February 20, 2020, and May 31, 2021. The primary aim of the study was to assess the cumulative incidence of C. auris candidemia in colonized patients. The secondary aim was to identify predictors of C. auris candidemia in the study population. RESULTS: During the study period, 157 patients admitted to ICUs in our hospital became colonized with C. auris; 59% of them were affected by COVID-19. Overall, 27 patients (17%) developed C. auris candidemia. The cumulative risk of developing C. auris candidemia was > 25% at 60 days after first detection of C. auris colonization. Seven patients with C. auris candidemia (26%) also developed a late recurrent episode. All C. auris blood isolates during the first occurring episode were resistant to fluconazole and susceptible to echinocandins, while 15 (56%) were resistant to amphotericin B. During late recurrent episodes, emergent resistance to caspofungin and amphotericin B occurred in one case each. In the final multivariable model, only multisite colonization retained an independent association with the development of C. auris candidemia. CONCLUSION: Candida auris candidemia may occur in up to one fourth of colonized critically ill patients, and multisite colonization is an independent risk factor for the development of candidemia. Implementing adequate infection control measures remains crucial to prevent colonization with C. auris and indirectly the subsequent development of infection.

5.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-332147

ABSTRACT

Background The neurological manifestations of COVID-19 have not been well characterized. Our goals were to determine the prevalence of neurological diagnoses among COVID-19 patients hospitalized in intensive care unit (ICU) and non-ICU settings and ascertain differences between adults and children. Methods We analysed the International Severe Acute Respiratory and emerging Infection Consortium (ISARIC) database, which collects data from 61 countries and 1507 sites. Analyses of neurological manifestations and neurological complications considered unadjusted prevalence estimates for predefined patient subgroups, and adjusted estimates as a function of patient age and time of hospitalisation using generalised linear models. Findings Overall, 161 239 patients (158 267 adults;2972 children) hospitalized with COVID-19 were included. In adults and children, the most frequent neurological manifestations at admission were fatigue (adults: 37·4%;children: 20·4%), altered consciousness (20·9%;6·8%), myalgia (16·9%;7·6%), dysgeusia (7·4%;1·9%), anosmia (6·0%;2·2%), and seizure (1·1%;5·2%). Among adults, rates were significantly higher in the ICU cohort than in the non-ICU cohort for myalgia (19·9% vs. 16·1%, p<0·001) and anosmia (6·3% vs. 5·9%, p=0·01) but lower in the ICU cohort for altered consciousness (10·8% vs. 24%, p<0·001) and seizure (0·8% vs. 1·2%, p<0·001). In children, rates were significantly higher in the ICU cohort than in the non-ICU cohort for fatigue (30·4% vs. 18·7%, p<0·001), myalgia (12·8% vs. 6·7%, p<0·001), and altered consciousness (12% vs. 5·7%, p<0·001). In adults, the most frequent in-hospital neurological complications were stroke (1·5%), seizure (1%), and central nervous system (CNS) infection (0·2%). Each occurred more frequently in ICU than in non-ICU patients. In children, seizure was the only neurological complication to occur more frequently in ICU than in non-ICU patients (7·1 vs. 2·3, p<0·001). Hypertension, chronic neurological disease, and the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation were associated with increased risk of stroke. Altered consciousness was associated with CNS infection, seizure, and stroke. All neurological complications reported during hospitalisation were associated with increased odds of death. Interpretation Adults and children have different neurological manifestations and in-hospital complications associated with COVID-19. Hypertension and previous neurological disease are risk factors for in-hospital neurological complications, which are associated with an increased probability of death in both adults and children.

6.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 9: 823837, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775695

ABSTRACT

Background: Several cases of adverse reactions following vaccination for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with adenoviral vector vaccines or mRNA-based vaccines have been reported to date. The underlying syndrome has been named "vaccine-induced immune thrombotic thrombocytopenia" (VITT) or "thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome (TTS)" with different clinical manifestations. Methods: We report the clinical course of five patients who had severe adverse reactions to COVID-19 vaccines, either with VITT/TTS, abdominal or pulmonary thrombosis after adenoviral vaccines, or Stevens' Johnson syndrome because of mRNA vaccination, all of whom required admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). Conclusions: All patients with severe or life-threatening suspected reaction to different types of COVID-19 vaccination required ICU admission. A prompt evaluation of early symptoms and individualized clinical management is needed to improve outcomes.

7.
Respir Physiol Neurobiol ; 301: 103889, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1747608

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe the effects of timing of intubation in COVID-19 patients that fail helmet continuous positive airway pressure (h-CPAP) on progression and severity of disease. METHODS: COVID-19 patients that failed h-CPAP, required intubation, and underwent chest computed tomography (CT) at two levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP, 8 and 16 cmH2O) were included in this retrospective study. Patients were divided in two groups (early versus late) based on the duration of h-CPAP before intubation. Endpoints included percentage of non-aerated lung tissue at PEEP of 8 cmH2O, respiratory system compliance and oxygenation. RESULTS: Fifty-two patients were included and classified in early (h-CPAP for ≤2 days, N = 26) and late groups (h-CPAP for >2 days, N = 26). Patients in the late compared to early intubation group presented: 1) lower respiratory system compliance (median difference, MD -7 mL/cmH2O, p = 0.044) and PaO2/FiO2 (MD -29 mmHg, p = 0.047), 2) higher percentage of non-aerated lung tissue (MD 7.2%, p = 0.023) and 3) similar lung recruitment increasing PEEP from 8 to 16 cmH2O (MD 0.1%, p = 0.964). CONCLUSIONS: In COVID-19 patients receiving h-CPAP, late intubation was associated with worse clinical presentation at ICU admission and more advanced disease. The possible detrimental effects of delaying intubation should be carefully considered in these patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Continuous Positive Airway Pressure , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
8.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-306491

ABSTRACT

Background: The incidence and clinical presentation of neurological manifestations of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remain unclear. No data regarding the use of neuromonitoring tools in this group of patients are available. Methods: : This is a retrospective study of prospectively collected data. The primary aim was to assess the incidence and type of neurological complications in critically ill COVID-19 patients and their effect on survival, as well as on hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) length-of-stay. The secondary aim was to describe cerebral hemodynamic changes detected by noninvasive neuromonitoring modalities such as transcranial doppler (TCD), optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD), and pupillometry. Results: : Ninety-four patients with COVID-19 receiving mechanical ventilation and admitted to an ICU from February 28 to June 30, 2020, were included in this study. Fifty-three patients underwent noninvasive neuromonitoring. Neurological complications were detected in 47/94 patients (50%), with delirium as the most common manifestation. Patients with neurological complications, compared to those without, had longer hospital (36.8±25.1 vs. 19.4±16.9 days, p <0.001) and ICU (31.5±22.6 vs. 11.5±10.1 days, p <0.001) stay. The duration of mechanical ventilation was independently associated with risk of developing neurological complications (OR 1.100, 95%CI 1.046-1.175, p=0.001). Patients with increased intracranial pressure (ICP) measured by ONSD (19% of the overall population) had longer ICU stays. Conclusions: : In conclusion, neurological complications are common in critically ill patients with COVID-19 receiving invasive mechanical ventilation and are associated with prolonged ICU length-of-stay. Multimodal noninvasive neuromonitoring systems are useful tools for early detection of cerebrovascular changes in COVID-19. Registration number: 163/2020

9.
Microorganisms ; 10(2)2022 Feb 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674731

ABSTRACT

Reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has been described in critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia. In the present two-center retrospective experience, we primarily aimed to assess the cumulative risk of HSV-1 reactivation detected on bronchoalveolar fluid (BALF) samples in invasively ventilated COVID-19 patients with worsening respiratory function. The secondary objectives were the identification of predictors for HSV-1 reactivation and the assessment of its possible prognostic impact. Overall, 41 patients met the study inclusion criteria, and 12/41 patients developed HSV-1 reactivation (29%). No independent predictors of HSV-1 reactivation were identified in the present study. No association was found between HSV-1 reactivation and mortality. Eleven out of 12 patients with HSV-1 reactivation received antiviral therapy with intravenous acyclovir. In conclusion, HSV-1 reactivation is frequently detected in intubated patients with COVID-19. An antiviral treatment in COVID-19 patients with HSV-1 reactivation and worsening respiratory function might be considered.

10.
J Neurol Sci ; 434: 120162, 2022 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1654797

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: Neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms that persist or develop three months after the onset of COVID-19 pose a significant threat to the global healthcare system. These symptoms are yet to be synthesized and quantified via meta-analysis. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms reported 12 weeks (3 months) or more after acute COVID-19 onset in adults. DATA SOURCES: A systematic search of PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Google Scholar and Scopus was conducted for studies published between January 1st, 2020 and August 1st, 2021. The systematic review was guided by Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses. STUDY SELECTION: Studies were included if the length of follow-up satisfied the National Institute for Healthcare Excellence (NICE) definition of post-COVID-19 syndrome (symptoms that develop or persist ≥3 months after the onset of COVID-19). Additional criteria included the reporting of neurological or neuropsychiatric symptoms in individuals with COVID-19. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Two authors independently extracted data on patient characteristics, hospital and/or ICU admission, acute-phase COVID-19 symptoms, length of follow-up, and neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms. MAIN OUTCOME(S) AND MEASURE(S): The primary outcome was the prevalence of neurological and neuropsychiatric symptoms reported ≥3 months post onset of COVID-19. We also compared post-COVID-19 syndrome in hospitalised vs. non-hospitalised patients, with vs. without ICU admission during the acute phase of infection, and with mid-term (3 to 6 months) and long-term (>6 months) follow-up. RESULTS: Of 1458 articles, 19 studies, encompassing a total of 11,324 patients, were analysed. Overall prevalence for neurological post-COVID-19 symptoms were: fatigue (37%, 95% CI: 24%-50%), brain fog (32%, 9%-55%), memory issues (27%, 18%-36%), attention disorder (22%, 10%-34%), myalgia (18%, 4%-32%), anosmia (12%, 7%-17%), dysgeusia (11%, 4%-17%) and headache (10%, 1%-21%). Neuropsychiatric conditions included sleep disturbances (31%, 18%-43%), anxiety (23%, 13%-33%) and depression (12%, 7%-21%). Neuropsychiatric symptoms substantially increased in prevalence between mid- and long-term follow-up. Compared to non-hospitalised patients, patients hospitalised for acute COVID-19 had reduced frequency of anosmia, anxiety, depression, dysgeusia, fatigue, headache, myalgia, and sleep disturbance at three (or more) months post-infection. Conversely, hospital admission was associated with higher frequency of memory issues (OR: 1.9, 95% CI: 1.4-2.3). Cohorts with >20% of patients admitted to the ICU during acute COVID-19 experienced higher prevalence of fatigue, anxiety, depression, and sleep disturbances than cohorts with <20% of ICU admission. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Fatigue, cognitive dysfunction (brain fog, memory issues, attention disorder) and sleep disturbances appear to be key features of post-COVID-19 syndrome. Psychiatric manifestations (sleep disturbances, anxiety, and depression) are common and increase significantly in prevalence over time. Randomised controlled trials are necessary to develop intervention strategy to reduce disease burden.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fatigue/diagnosis , Headache/epidemiology , Humans
11.
Front Neurol ; 12: 735469, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607501

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The role of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for the evaluation of cerebral haemodynamics is gaining increasing popularity because of its noninvasive nature. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of the integral components of regional cerebral oxygenation (rSO2) measured by NIRS [i.e., arterial-oxyhemoglobin (O2Hbi) and venous-deoxyhemoglobin (HHbi)-components], as indirect surrogates of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in a cohort of critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We compared these findings to the gold standard technique for noninvasive CBF assessment, Transcranial Doppler (TCD). Methods: Mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19 admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Policlinico San Martino Hospital, Genova, Italy, who underwent multimodal neuromonitoring (including NIRS and TCD), were included. rSO2 and its components [relative changes in O2Hbi, HHbi, and total haemoglobin (cHbi)] were compared with TCD (cerebral blood flow velocity, CBFV). Changes (Δ) in CBFV and rSO2, ΔO2Hbi, ΔHHbi, and ΔcHbi after systemic arterial blood pressure (MAP) modifications induced by different manoeuvres (e.g., rescue therapies and haemodynamic manipulation) were assessed using mixed-effect linear regression analysis and repeated measures correlation coefficients. All values were normalised as percentage changes from the baseline (Δ%). Results: One hundred and four measurements from 25 patients were included. Significant effects of Δ%MAP on Δ%CBF were observed after rescue manoeuvres for CBFV, ΔcHbi, and ΔO2Hbi. The highest correlation was found between ΔCBFV and ΔΔO2Hbi (R = 0.88, p < 0.0001), and the poorest between ΔCBFV and ΔΔHHbi (R = 0.34, p = 0.002). Conclusions: ΔO2Hbi had the highest accuracy to assess CBF changes, reflecting its role as the main component for vasomotor response after changes in MAP. The use of indexes derived from the different components of rSO2 can be useful for the bedside evaluation of cerebral haemodynamics in mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19.

12.
Critical Care Medicine ; 50:54-54, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1597110

ABSTRACT

Thus, in this meta-analysis we report the characteristics of patients who experience neurological or neuropsychiatric symptoms at least 12 weeks after COVID-19 infection. The symptoms of post COVID-19 syndrome were not similarly distributed, post exertional malaise (73.3%), fatigue (43.5%), brain fog (35.1%), memory issues (31.4%), headache (20.2%) and anosmia (11.4%) were most frequent. B Introduction: b Despite the prevalence of COVID-19 globally, the post-viral syndrome it precipitates remains poorly described. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Critical Care Medicine is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

13.
Crit Care Med ; 49(12): e1223-e1233, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526199

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Stroke has been reported in observational series as a frequent complication of coronavirus disease 2019, but more information is needed regarding stroke prevalence and outcomes. We explored the prevalence and outcomes of acute stroke in an international cohort of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 who required ICU admission. DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected database. SETTING: A registry of coronavirus disease 2019 patients admitted to ICUs at over 370 international sites was reviewed for patients diagnosed with acute stroke during their stay. PATIENTS: Patients older than 18 years old with acute coronavirus disease 2019 infection in ICU. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Of 2,699 patients identified (median age 59 yr; male 65%), 59 (2.2%) experienced acute stroke: 0.7% ischemic, 1.0% hemorrhagic, and 0.5% unspecified type. Systemic anticoagulant use was not associated with any stroke type. The frequency of diabetes, hypertension, and smoking was higher in patients with ischemic stroke than in stroke-free and hemorrhagic stroke patients. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support was more common among patients with hemorrhagic (56%) and ischemic stroke (16%) than in those without stroke (10%). Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients had higher cumulative 90-day probabilities of hemorrhagic (relative risk = 10.5) and ischemic stroke (relative risk = 1.7) versus nonextracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients. Hemorrhagic stroke increased the hazard of death (hazard ratio = 2.74), but ischemic stroke did not-similar to the effects of these stroke types seen in noncoronavirus disease 2019 ICU patients. CONCLUSIONS: In an international registry of ICU patients with coronavirus disease 2019, stroke was infrequent. Hemorrhagic stroke, but not ischemic stroke, was associated with increased mortality. Further, both hemorrhagic stroke and ischemic stroke were associated with traditional vascular risk factors. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use was strongly associated with both stroke and death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Stroke/epidemiology , Aged , Comorbidity , Critical Illness , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
14.
BMJ Neurology Open ; 3(Suppl 1):A13-A14, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1476584

ABSTRACT

ObjectiveCOVID-19 has been identified as a risk factor for severe cerebrovascular complications, albeit mostly in small patient populations, limited to specific regions, and including all severities of disease. Utilising the largest database of critically-ill COVID-19 patients, we investigated risk factors for stroke in intensive care unit (ICU) COVID-19 patients.MethodsData for this matched case-control study were extracted from a large international registry of adult COVID-19 patients requiring ICU admission. Patients with imaging-confirmed cerebrovascular events identified following ICU admission were compared against five controls per case, matched for demographics, morphometrics, illness severity, and ICU days. Expert consensus determined key clinical and laboratory variables for risk assessment.ResultsFrom January 1-December 21 2020, 2,715 ICU patients were registered across >370 sites spanning 52 countries;acute stroke was identified during the ICU stay in 59(2.2%);27(46%) haemorrhagic, 19(32%) ischaemic, 13(22%) unspecified. Stroke patients had higher SOFA and APACHE scores, more frequent hypertension and cardiovascular disease, and more often required mechanical ventilation, vasopressors, and ECMO. Diabetes, hypertension, smoking, and Caucasian ethnicity were identified as risk factors for ischaemic versus haemorrhagic stroke and being stroke-free. Ethnicity (Hispanic or black), higher PaO2, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) were significant risk factors for haemorrhagic stroke.Anticoagulation had no association with either stroke subtype.ConclusionsSevere illness and more aggressive management were major risk factors for acute stroke. Traditional vascular risk factors and Caucasian ethnicity were risk factors for ischaemic stroke, while Hispanic or black ethnicity, higher PaO2, and ECMO were significant risk factors for haemorrhagic stroke.

15.
J Clin Med ; 10(20)2021 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470899

ABSTRACT

Monoclonal antibodies, such as bamlanivimab and etesevimab combination (BEC), have been proposed for patients with mild or moderate coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, few studies have assessed the factors associated with the early administration of BEC or the impact of early BEC treatment on the clinical evolution of the patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all adults with COVID-19 who received BEC at three institutions in the Liguria region. The primary endpoint was to investigate the clinical variables associated with early BEC infusion. Secondary endpoints were 30-day overall mortality and the composite endpoint of requirement of hospital admission or need for supplemental oxygen during the 30-day follow-up period. A total of 127 patients (median age 70 years; 56.7% males) received BEC. Of those, 93 (73.2%) received BEC within 5 days from symptoms onset (early BEC). Patients with a higher Charlson comorbidity index were more likely to receive early treatment (odds ratio (OR) 1.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-2.45; p = 0.03) in contrast to those reporting fever at presentation (OR 0.26, 0.08-0.82; p = 0.02). Early BEC was associated with lower likelihood of hospital admission or need for supplemental oxygen (OR 0.19, 0.06-0.65; p = 0.008). Five patients who received early BEC died during the follow-up period, but only one of them due to COVID-19-related causes. Early bamlanivimab and etesevimab combination was more frequently administered to patients with a high Charlson comorbidity index. Despite this, early BEC was associated with a lower rate of hospital admission or need for any supplementary oxygen compared to late administration. These results suggest that efforts should focus on encouraging early BEC use in patients with mild-moderate COVID-19 at risk for complications.

16.
Ann Med ; 53(1): 1779-1786, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462157

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: An unexpected high prevalence of enterococcal bloodstream infection (BSI) has been observed in critically ill patients with COVID-19 in the intensive care unit (ICU). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The primary objective was to describe the characteristics of ICU-acquired enterococcal BSI in critically ill patients with COVID-19. A secondary objective was to exploratorily assess the predictors of 30-day mortality in critically ill COVID-19 patients with ICU-acquired enterococcal BSI. RESULTS: During the study period, 223 patients with COVID-19 were admitted to COVID-19-dedicated ICUs in our centre. Overall, 51 episodes of enterococcal BSI, occurring in 43 patients, were registered. 29 (56.9%) and 22 (43.1%) BSI were caused by Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium, respectively. The cumulative incidence of ICU-acquired enterococcal BSI was of 229 episodes per 1000 ICU admissions (95% mid-p confidence interval [CI] 172-298). Most patients received an empirical therapy with at least one agent showing in vitro activity against the blood isolate (38/43, 88%). The crude 30-day mortality was 42% (18/43) and 57% (4/7) in the entire series and in patients with vancomycin-resistant E. faecium BSI, respectively. The sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score showed an independent association with increased mortality (odds ratio 1.32 per one-point increase, with 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.66, p = .021). CONCLUSIONS: The cumulative incidence of enterococcal BSI is high in critically ill patients with COVID-19. Our results suggest a crucial role of the severity of the acute clinical conditions, to which both the underlying viral pneumonia and the enterococcal BSI may contribute, in majorly influencing the outcome.KEY MESSAGESThe cumulative incidence of enterococcal BSI is high in critically ill patients with COVID-19.The crude 30-day mortality of enterococcal BSI in critically ill patients with COVID-19 may be higher than 40%.There could be a crucial role of the severity of the acute clinical conditions, to which both the underlying viral pneumonia and the enterococcal BSI may contribute, in majorly influencing the outcome.


Subject(s)
Bacteremia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Enterococcus faecalis , Enterococcus faecium , Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/epidemiology , Mortality , Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci , Aged , Bacteremia/microbiology , Critical Illness , Female , Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Middle Aged , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 738086, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441122

ABSTRACT

Background: In a disease that has only existed for 18 months, it is difficult to be fully informed of the long-term sequelae of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Evidence is growing that most organ systems can be affected by the virus, causing severe disabilities in survivors. The extent of the aftermath will declare itself over the next 5-10 years, but it is likely to be substantial with profound socio-economic impact on society. Methods: This is an international multi-center, prospective long-term follow-up study of patients who developed severe coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) and were admitted to Intensive Care Units (ICUs). The study will be conducted at international tertiary hospitals. Patients will be monitored from time of ICU discharge up to 24 months. Information will be collected on demographics, co-existing illnesses before ICU admission, severity of illness during ICU admission and post-ICU quality of life as well as organ dysfunction and recovery. Statistical analysis will consist of patient trajectories over time for the key variables of quality of life and organ function. Using latent class analysis, we will determine if there are distinct patterns of patients in terms of recovery. Multivariable regression analyses will be used to examine associations between baseline characteristics and severity variables upon admission and discharge in the ICU, and how these impact outcomes at all follow-up time points up to 2 years. Ethics and Dissemination: The core study team and local principal investigators will ensure that the study adheres to all relevant national and local regulations, and that the necessary approvals are in place before a site may enroll patients. Clinical Trial Registration:anzctr.org.au: ACTRN12620000799954.

19.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 214, 2021 06 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440944

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Critically ill COVID-19 patients have pathophysiological lung features characterized by perfusion abnormalities. However, to date no study has evaluated whether the changes in the distribution of pulmonary gas and blood volume are associated with the severity of gas-exchange impairment and the type of respiratory support (non-invasive versus invasive) in patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: This was a single-center, retrospective cohort study conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Northern Italy during the first pandemic wave. Pulmonary gas and blood distribution was assessed using a technique for quantitative analysis of dual-energy computed tomography. Lung aeration loss (reflected by percentage of normally aerated lung tissue) and the extent of gas:blood volume mismatch (percentage of non-aerated, perfused lung tissue-shunt; aerated, non-perfused dead space; and non-aerated/non-perfused regions) were evaluated in critically ill COVID-19 patients with different clinical severity as reflected by the need for non-invasive or invasive respiratory support. RESULTS: Thirty-five patients admitted to the intensive care unit between February 29th and May 30th, 2020 were included. Patients requiring invasive versus non-invasive mechanical ventilation had both a lower percentage of normally aerated lung tissue (median [interquartile range] 33% [24-49%] vs. 63% [44-68%], p < 0.001); and a larger extent of gas:blood volume mismatch (43% [30-49%] vs. 25% [14-28%], p = 0.001), due to higher shunt (23% [15-32%] vs. 5% [2-16%], p = 0.001) and non-aerated/non perfused regions (5% [3-10%] vs. 1% [0-2%], p = 0.001). The PaO2/FiO2 ratio correlated positively with normally aerated tissue (ρ = 0.730, p < 0.001) and negatively with the extent of gas-blood volume mismatch (ρ = - 0.633, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In critically ill patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia, the need for invasive mechanical ventilation and oxygenation impairment were associated with loss of aeration and the extent of gas:blood volume mismatch.


Subject(s)
Blood Volume/physiology , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/metabolism , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/metabolism , Pulmonary Gas Exchange/physiology , Aged , Blood Gas Analysis/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
20.
Ultrasound Med Biol ; 47(12): 3323-3332, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433868

ABSTRACT

Chest computed tomography (CT) may provide insights into the pathophysiology of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), although it is not suitable for a timely bedside dynamic assessment of patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU); therefore, lung ultrasound (LUS) has been proposed as a complementary diagnostic tool. The aims of this study were to investigate different lungs phenotypes in patients with COVID-19 and to assess the differences in CT and LUS scores between ICU survivors and non-survivors. We also explored the association between CT and LUS, and oxygenation (arterial partial pressure of oxygen [PaO2]/fraction of inspired oxygen [FiO2]) and clinical parameters. The study included 39 patients with COVID-19. CT scans revealed types 1, 2 and 3 phenotypes in 62%, 28% and 10% of patients, respectively. Among survivors, pattern 1 was prevalent (p < 0.005). Chest CT and LUS scores differed between survivors and non-survivors both at ICU admission and 10 days after and were associated with ICU mortality. Chest CT score was positively correlated with LUS findings at ICU admission (r = 0.953, p < 0.0001) and was inversely correlated with PaO2/FiO2 (r = -0.375, p = 0.019) and C-reactive protein (r = 0.329, p = 0.041). LUS score was inversely correlated with PaO2/FiO2 (r = -0.345, p = 0.031). COVID-19 presents distinct phenotypes with differences between survivors and non-survivors. LUS is a valuable monitoring tool in an ICU setting because it may correlate with CT findings and mortality, although it cannot predict oxygenation changes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/therapy , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Respiration, Artificial , Aged , COVID-19/blood , Critical Care , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/blood , Phenotype , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Ultrasonography
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