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2.
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology ; 228(1):S76-S76, 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2310629
3.
Journal of International Economic Law ; 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2310628

ABSTRACT

In the last few years, many states around the world have faced a series of shocks to their economies-from the seizing up of global supply chains to the weaponization of trade and finance-that have catapulted concerns about how to strike a balance between risk, reward, and resilience into the center of public discussions and policy-making. This Article provides a new Risk, Reward, and Resilience Framework, which synthesizes and integrates insights from diverse disciplines and domains. I set out the drivers of each element, how they are connected, and resulting policy choices. To illustrate its practical application, I apply Risk, Reward, and Resilience Framework to two case studies involving economic interdependence: the COVID-19 supply chain shock and China's economic coercion of Australia. In doing so, I provide policymakers with a new mental model for thinking about and working through complex policy challenges.

4.
Behaviour Change ; 40(1):30-50, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2292742

ABSTRACT

When followed, there is evidence that social distancing measures play a major role in reducing the transmission of viruses such as COVID-19. However, not all individuals follow the guidance. We explored barriers and facilitators to compliance with UK social distancing guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic through semi-structured interviews with 116 adults. Data were analysed using reflexive thematic analysis and themes mapped to the Capability, Opportunity and Motivation Model of Behaviour (COM-B). Barriers to compliance included inconsistent rules, caring responsibilities, fatigue, unintended consequences of control measures, and the need for emotional support. Facilitators were informational support and social responsibility. Six themes were both a barrier and a facilitator: lived environment, beliefs about consequences of non-compliance, influence of others, practical support, and trust in government. Reflective motivation, psychological capability, and social opportunity were important drivers for compliance. Measures that enable social support alongside strategies to maintain motivation to comply, provide clear guidance and optimise social cohesion should be promoted. Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Australian Association for Cognitive and Behaviour Therapy.

5.
European journal of public health ; 32(Suppl 3), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2102059

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused unprecedented challenges for populations, health systems and governments worldwide, which have resulted in lasting economic, social and health impacts. The results of such have been felt disproportionately throughout society and existing vulnerabilities have been highlighted and heightened. A clear understanding of the extent of these vulnerabilities is needed in order to fully address the problem. The World Health Organization Collaborating Centre on Investment for Health and Well-being (WHOCC), Public Health Wales has developed a summary report focusing on the existing and emerging inequalities resulting from the pandemic, as identified through international evidence and learning from the International Horizon Scanning Reports. These reports, undertaken between May 2020 - August 2021, are based upon rapid evidence synthesis reviews of international literature. The summary report focuses on global learning and best practices in order to better understand and address the unequal impacts of the pandemic. The information has been categorised according to the five essential conditions required to enable a healthy life as presented within the WHO health equity conditions framework. The report provides evidence on groups most vulnerable to both direct and indirect impacts of the pandemic as well as promising practice to address the resulting inequity. Inequalities and related factors explored within the report include but are not limited to, level of deprivation and education. Taking a global perspective, this report summarises international evidence to support inclusive, sustainable, and equitable solutions, such as protecting economic well-being and taking an intergenerational lens in both response and recovery. To address and mitigate the impact of the pandemic upon vulnerable groups, collating and sharing international evidence and best practice has proven to support equitable long-term socio-economic and environmental recovery. Key messages • International learning provides vital insights to support recovery in Wales and beyond. • Responses to the pandemic should address the needs of the vulnerable to reduce existing health gaps.

6.
Digital Government: Research and Practice ; 2(1), 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1772333

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 public health emergency caused widespread economic shutdown and unemployment. The resulting surge in Unemployment Insurance claims threatened to overwhelm the legacy systems state workforce agencies rely on to collect, process, and pay claims. In Rhode Island, we developed a scalable cloud solution to collect Pandemic Unemployment Assistance claims as part of a new program created under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act to extend unemployment benefits to independent contractors and gig-economy workers not covered by traditional Unemployment Insurance. Our new system was developed, tested, and deployed within 10 days following the passage of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act, making Rhode Island the first state in the nation to collect, validate, and pay Pandemic Unemployment Assistance claims. A cloud-enhanced interactive voice response system was deployed a week later to handle the corresponding surge in weekly certifications for continuing unemployment benefits. Cloud solutions can augment legacy systems by offloading processes that are more efficiently handled in modern scalable systems, reserving the limited resources of legacy systems for what they were originally designed. This agile use of combined technologies allowed Rhode Island to deliver timely Pandemic Unemployment Assistance benefits with an estimated cost savings of $502,000 (representing a 411% return on investment). © 2020 Owner/Author.

7.
Behaviour Change ; : 21, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1768710

ABSTRACT

When followed, there is evidence that social distancing measures play a major role in reducing the transmission of viruses such as COVID-19. However, not all individuals follow the guidance. We explored barriers and facilitators to compliance with UK social distancing guidelines during the COVID-19 pandemic through semi-structured interviews with 116 adults. Data were analysed using reflexive thematic analysis and themes mapped to the Capability, Opportunity and Motivation Model of Behaviour (COM-B). Barriers to compliance included inconsistent rules, caring responsibilities, fatigue, unintended consequences of control measures, and the need for emotional support. Facilitators were informational support and social responsibility. Six themes were both a barrier and a facilitator: lived environment, beliefs about consequences of non-compliance, influence of others, practical support, and trust in government. Reflective motivation, psychological capability, and social opportunity were important drivers for compliance. Measures that enable social support alongside strategies to maintain motivation to comply, provide clear guidance and optimise social cohesion should be promoted.

8.
Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics ; 111:S79-S79, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1695365
10.
European Journal of Public Health ; 31:441-441, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1610471
11.
European Journal of Public Health ; 31:2, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1609721
12.
Pediatric Diabetes ; 22(SUPPL 30):35-36, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1571032

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Health insurance coverage type differs significantly by socio-economic status and racial groups in the United States. There is limited data on the association between insurance and the risk of adverse outcomes for patients with pre-existing T1D and COVID19. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine if publicly insured pediatric and adolescent patients with Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) were more likely to experience adverse outcomes compared to privately insured patients with acute COVID-19 infections. Methods: Data from 575 patients with previously established T1D aged <24 years with acute COVID-19 infections was analyzed from the T1DX-COVID-19 Surveillance Registry. Data for the registry was collected from 52 endocrinology clinics across the U.S, using an online survey tool. Each site completed the survey using electronic medical record (EMR) data between April 2020 and May 2021. Results: Privately insured patients were more likely to identify as Non-Hispanic White than publicly insured patients (63% vs 18%, p<0.001). T1D patients with COVID-19 that were on public insurance reported higher A1c (9.5% vs 7.9%, p<0.001), lower insulin pump use (29% vs 62%, p<0.001), as well as lower continuous glucose monitor (CGM) use (51% vs 77%, p<0.001) compared to privately insurance patients. Publicly insured patients with T1D and COVID-19 were three times more likely to be hospitalized than privately insured patients (Odds Ratio 3.4, 95% Confidence Interval: 2.1-5.4). Conclusions: Our data reveals a high rate of hospitalization and DKA among children and adolescents with T1D and COVID19 with public health insurance despite controlling for other potential confounders. This underscores that those on public health insurance are more vulnerable to adverse health outcomes during the COVID19 pandemic. (Table Presented).

15.
International Journal of Gynecological Cancer ; 31(Suppl 3):A325-A326, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1476730

ABSTRACT

Introduction/Background*The Living Well Cancer Programme is an Irish Cancer Society funded pilot programme aimed at developing a survivorship service for women survivors of cancer.A key element of this programme is public and patient involvement (PPI) in our efforts. With this in mind, we established a digital advisory board through a company called medCrowd to ascertain the opinions and experiences of our patients to guide development of this pilot service.Methodology16 patient representatives were selected from those attending the follow-up and surveillance programme at both clinical sites in Dublin. Participants were selected based on cancer site and treatment modalities experienced. Participants were given access to a secure site on the medCrowd platform, and 5 questions were posed to them over the course of 6 weeks in early 2021. The 5 questions focused on (1)what a survivorship service should offer, (2)what resources would participants recommend, (3)what advice would participants give to a newly diagnosed person, (4)what would a successful service look like and (5)what were the participants views on virtual follow up post COVID-19. Responses were text-based.Result(s)*Of the 16 participants selected, 14 engaged in the process. The overall response rate for all questions was 71% with 94 individual messages sent over the conversations.Participants identified that patient needs for survivorship depend on disease site, stage and treatment modalities and do change over time. Nevertheless, they identified areas such as sexual dysfunction, fertility, peer support groups, career and financial advice as essential for any survivorship service to address. All participants spoke of the need for a designated contact person on their medical team whom they can contact with ‘minor’ queries. The need for psychological support both formal and informal was also highlighted. Participants also spoke about their own unmet needs and a need to increase supports around the issues of menopause, exercise, nutrition and fatigue management.Participants also felt there were aspects of a survivorship service which could be offered virtually, however, all would prefer some face-to-face contact with their treating team.Conclusion*The information provided through this digital advisory board will now inform the work of the Living Well Cancer Programme.

16.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1801, 2021 10 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455955

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and associated restrictions caused major global disruption. Individuals with long-term physical health conditions (LTCs) are at higher risk of severe illness and often subject to the strictest pandemic guidance, so may be disproportionally affected. The aim of this study was to qualitatively explore how living with a LTC during the COVID-19 pandemic affected people's mental health and wellbeing. METHODS: Participants were people living with LTCs who participated in telephone/video call interviews based on a semi-structured topic guide. Key themes and subthemes were determined using deductive and inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: The sample included 32 participants with LTCs (most commonly cancer, respiratory conditions or cardiovascular diseases), mean age 57 (SD 13) years, 66% female and 72% white British. There were four overarching themes specific to living with a LTC. These were 1) high levels of fear and anxiety related to perceived consequences of catching COVID-19, 2) impact of shielding/isolation on mental health and wellbeing, 3) experience of healthcare during the pandemic and 4) anxiety created by uncertainty about the future. Fourteen subthemes were identified, including concerns about accessing essential supplies and the importance of social support. Individuals who lived alone and were advised to shield could be profoundly negatively affected. CONCLUSIONS: This study found that there were a number of aspects of living with a LTC during the pandemic that had a significant impact on mental health and well-being. There should be focus on how best to provide practical and social support to people with LTCs during a pandemic, particularly if they have to shield or isolate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Progress in Palliative Care ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1366899

ABSTRACT

This article charts the learning from an online, artmaking programme supporting individuals with a life-limiting illness. The programme sought to fill a gap caused by the temporary closure of face-to-face UK hospice-based day therapy programmes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants’ comments on this arts-based programme illustrated the sense of disrupted and diminished identity, linked to a deceased sense of agency, which terminal illness can bring. Responding to this need for increased agency led to the development of the PATCH (Palliative care patient-led change) programme. Individuals with a terminal illness will be invited to join an online collaborative group, to identify a specific issue they wish to address and to lead the change they wish to see. The PATCH group will be supported by a facilitator and a team of volunteers, whose roles will include supporting participants in planning and executing their change strategy. This article presents the conceptual underpinning for the PATCH programme, offering a tentative theory of the relationship between identity, moral purpose, agency, illness and the leadership of change for those living with a life-limiting illness. Challenging stereotypical views of palliative care patients, it explores a new community and asset-based approach to end-of-life care which supports individuals at the end of life in developing a positive self-view. © 2021 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

19.
Skin Health Dis ; 1(4): e59, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287402

ABSTRACT

Background: Eczema can have a considerable impact on quality of life. Treatments can improve this, but management is complex. Barriers to eczema self-management may be impacted upon by environmental context, such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Objectives: To explore experiences of eczema, self-management, and accessing healthcare and advice during the COVID-19 pandemic among young people with eczema and parents/carers of children with eczema. Methods: Qualitative semi-structured interviews were carried out with 36 participants recruited from general practices as part of randomised controlled trials of online eczema resources. Results: Changes to everyday life-Periods of staying at home due to the pandemic alter the burden of eczema, with reports of an improved routine and application of topical treatments for many, but difficulties with handwashing for others. Parents/carers reported improved eczema control due to closures of educational settings. Young people reported higher stress that may have triggered eczema flare-ups. Changes to access to advice and treatment-There was a reluctance to seek medical appointments in a non-emergency situation. Participants reported a lack of trust in the outcome of telephone consultations because health professionals were unable to see or feel the skin. Delays or difficulties when obtaining appointments and treatments caused frustration. Access to an online eczema resource was reported to have extra value in the context of the pandemic. Conclusion: Changes to lifestyle and access to healthcare during the pandemic have affected eczema and self-management. Healthcare settings may want to consider providing extra reassurance around remote consultations.

20.
Palliative Care and Social Practice ; 15:16, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1255889

ABSTRACT

Aims/goal of the work: The COVID-19 pandemic has challenged how we address bereavement and grieving in Ireland. Understanding how grief impacts in the intermediate and longterm is an issue of national importance. Planning will be required to meet emergent needs and to support communities. This project aimed to develop a national public health framework for Bereavement Care Design, methods, and approach taken: The framework was based on literature and developed through a national collaborative process with organisations and people at all levels of bereavement care, including state and voluntary sectors across Ireland. A working group of 16 representatives of organisations drafted the framework and supporting materials. The 4-level public health framework sets out needs and responses for All, Some & Few bereaved people. A national consultation was held. Results: The national consultation received 56 responses from a wide range of professionals working in bereavement care in Ireland. An overwhelmingly positive response was received;96% to 100% of respondents reported that they understood the framework and 94% could place their service within the tiered framework. Conclusion/lessons learned: This national framework provides a structure for planning short-term and more long-term responses and services to meet bereaved people's needs in a COVID and post-COVID-19 Ireland. However, we need a whole of government response to coordinate, progress, and embed innovative, evidencebased solutions to issues which arise. Specific to the COVID experience there are opportunities for public grief education and first-line services (Level 1). Based on predictions for difficulties in grief through lack of social support and other complexity there is also a requirement for investment in skills training and services at Levels 2, 3, and 4 of the bereavement model. The IHF has set out 7 policy pillars to shape an approach to policy on end of life and bereavement issues in Ireland. They advocate for the development of a new robust strategy taking into consideration the views of the public, the State, and those dealing professionally with end of life in all care settings, in palliative and bereavement care.

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