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1.
Non-conventional in English | [Unspecified Source], Grey literature | ID: grc-750512

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus -2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in late 2019 and has spread worldwide resulting in the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Although animal models have been evaluated for SARS-CoV-2 infection, none have recapitulated the severe lung disease phenotypes seen in hospitalized human cases. Here, we evaluate heterozygous transgenic mice expressing the human ACE2 receptor driven by the epithelial cell cytokeratin-18 gene promoter (K18-hACE2) as a model of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Intranasal inoculation of SARS-CoV-2 in K18-hACE2 mice results in high levels of viral infection in lung tissues with additional spread to other organs. Remarkably, a decline in pulmonary function, as measured by static and dynamic tests of respiratory capacity, occurs 4 days after peak viral titer and correlates with an inflammatory response marked by infiltration into the lung of monocytes, neutrophils, and activated T cells resulting in pneumonia. Cytokine profiling and RNA sequencing analysis of SARS-CoV-2-infected lung tissues show a massively upregulated innate immune response with prominent signatures of NF-kB-dependent, type I and II interferon signaling, and leukocyte activation pathways. Thus, the K18-hACE2 model of SARS-CoV-2 infection recapitulates many features of severe COVID-19 infection in humans and can be used to define the mechanistic basis of lung disease and test immune and antiviral-based countermeasures.

3.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 7777, 2021 04 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174704

ABSTRACT

Due to frequent and often severe lung affections caused by COVID-19, murine models of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) are increasingly used in experimental lung research. The one induced by a single lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure is practical. However, whether it is preferable to administer LPS intranasally or intratracheally remains an open question. Herein, female C57Bl/6 J mice were exposed intranasally or intratracheally to one dose of either saline or 3 mg/kg of LPS. They were studied 24 h later. The groups treated with LPS, either intranasally or intratracheally, exhibited a pronounced neutrophilic inflammation, signs of lung tissue damage and protein extravasation into the alveoli, and mild lung dysfunction. The magnitude of the response was generally not different between groups exposed intranasally versus intratracheally. However, the variability of some the responses was smaller in the LPS-treated groups exposed intranasally versus intratracheally. Notably, the saline-treated mice exposed intratracheally demonstrated a mild neutrophilic inflammation and alterations of the airway epithelium. We conclude that an intranasal exposure is as effective as an intratracheal exposure in a murine model of ARDS induced by LPS. Additionally, the groups exposed intranasally demonstrated less variability in the responses to LPS and less complications associated with the sham procedure.


Subject(s)
Inflammation/chemically induced , Lipopolysaccharides/adverse effects , Lung/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Administration, Intranasal , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Inflammation/pathology , Lipopolysaccharides/administration & dosage , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Proteins/analysis , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology
4.
Nat Immunol ; 21(11): 1327-1335, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-728991

ABSTRACT

Although animal models have been evaluated for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, none have fully recapitulated the lung disease phenotypes seen in humans who have been hospitalized. Here, we evaluate transgenic mice expressing the human angiotensin I-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor driven by the cytokeratin-18 (K18) gene promoter (K18-hACE2) as a model of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Intranasal inoculation of SARS-CoV-2 in K18-hACE2 mice results in high levels of viral infection in lungs, with spread to other organs. A decline in pulmonary function occurs 4 days after peak viral titer and correlates with infiltration of monocytes, neutrophils and activated T cells. SARS-CoV-2-infected lung tissues show a massively upregulated innate immune response with signatures of nuclear factor-κB-dependent, type I and II interferon signaling, and leukocyte activation pathways. Thus, the K18-hACE2 model of SARS-CoV-2 infection shares many features of severe COVID-19 infection and can be used to define the basis of lung disease and test immune and antiviral-based countermeasures.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pneumonia/pathology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Animals , COVID-19 , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Interferon Type I/immunology , Interferon-gamma/immunology , Keratin-18/genetics , Leukocytes/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation/immunology , Male , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Monocytes/immunology , NF-kappa B/immunology , Neutrophil Infiltration/immunology , Neutrophils/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia/genetics , Pneumonia/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Promoter Regions, Genetic/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Vero Cells , Virus Replication/immunology
5.
bioRxiv ; 2020 Jul 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-665969

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus -2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in late 2019 and has spread worldwide resulting in the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Although animal models have been evaluated for SARS-CoV-2 infection, none have recapitulated the severe lung disease phenotypes seen in hospitalized human cases. Here, we evaluate heterozygous transgenic mice expressing the human ACE2 receptor driven by the epithelial cell cytokeratin-18 gene promoter (K18-hACE2) as a model of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Intranasal inoculation of SARS-CoV-2 in K18-hACE2 mice results in high levels of viral infection in lung tissues with additional spread to other organs. Remarkably, a decline in pulmonary function, as measured by static and dynamic tests of respiratory capacity, occurs 4 days after peak viral titer and correlates with an inflammatory response marked by infiltration into the lung of monocytes, neutrophils, and activated T cells resulting in pneumonia. Cytokine profiling and RNA sequencing analysis of SARS-CoV-2-infected lung tissues show a massively upregulated innate immune response with prominent signatures of NF-kB-dependent, type I and II interferon signaling, and leukocyte activation pathways. Thus, the K18-hACE2 model of SARS-CoV-2 infection recapitulates many features of severe COVID-19 infection in humans and can be used to define the mechanistic basis of lung disease and test immune and antiviral-based countermeasures.

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