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1.
European Journal of Integrative Medicine ; 57 (no pagination), 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2158802
2.
Tourism Destination Management in a Post-Pandemic Context: Global Issues and Destination Management Solutions ; : 85-97, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1891274

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The COVID-19 pandemic has fundamentally impacted upon the travel supply chain and influenced tourist behaviours. This is further evidenced in corporate and travel firm concerns surrounding future sales and profitability. Instilling confidence amongst tourists is therefore imperative to ensure consumers continue purchasing the holiday product. However, the management of an intangible and relatively unknown virus has compounded the already difficult management of the tourist experience. Design/Methodology/Approach: The chapter reviews the impact of COVID-19 in the context of the tourism supply chain and the safety and security measures implemented in destinations. The financial implications of safety and security measures are acknowledged with management challenges and solutions discussed. The chapter underpins its analysis with the use of regional, national and international examples. Findings: Contingency strategies ranging from quarantine to health and safety certification have been deployed by national governments and regional authorities. However, the complexity of the tourism product and the range of stakeholders involved in its make-up and distribution compounds the ability to ensure safety from the virus. Practical Implications: The review acknowledges limitations of health and safety measures in the field and forwards alternative suggestions that can be adopted by tourism destinations and enterprises. Originality/Value: The chapter is novel in that it reviews health and safety and financial security practices in the field as they relate to the COVID-19 pandemic. © 2021 Emerald Publishing Limited.

4.
Frontiers in Environmental Science ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1793030

ABSTRACT

Quantifying the resilience of ecological communities to increasingly frequent and severe environmental disturbance, such as natural disasters, requires long-term and continuous observations and a research community that is itself resilient. Investigators must have reliable access to data, a variety of resources to facilitate response to perturbation, and mechanisms for rapid and efficient return to function and/or adaptation to post-disaster conditions. There are always challenges to meeting these requirements, which may be compounded by multiple, co-occurring incidents. For example, travel restrictions resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic hindered preparations for, and responses to, environmental disasters that are the hallmarks of resilient research communities. During its initial years of data collection, a diversity of disturbances—earthquakes, wildfires, droughts, hurricanes and floods—have impacted sites at which the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) intends to measure organisms and environment for at least 30 years. These events strain both the natural and human communities associated with the Observatory, and additional stressors like public health crises only add to the burden. Here, we provide a case-study of how NEON has demonstrated not only internal resilience in the face of the public health crisis of COVID-19, but has also enhanced the resilience of ecological research communities associated with the network and provided crucial information for quantifying the impacts of and responses to disturbance events on natural systems—their ecological resilience. The key components discussed are: 1) NEON’s infrastructure and resources to support its core internal community, to adapt to rapidly changing situations, and to quickly resume operations following disruption, thus enabling the recovery of information flow crucial for data continuity;2) how NEON data, tools, and materials are foundational in supporting the continuation of research programs in the face of challenges like those of COVID-19, thus enhancing the resilience of the greater ecological research community;and 3) the importance of diverse and consistent data for defining baseline and post-disaster conditions that are required to quantify the effects of natural disasters on ecosystem patterns and processes. Copyright © 2022 Robinson, Barnett, Jones, Stanish and Parker.

5.
Letters in Biomathematics ; 8(1):179-189, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1787354

ABSTRACT

In this paper we use a data driven SIR model to capture the dynamics of the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in the state of Michigan, USA before vaccines were available. The model is then used to formulate an optimal control problem in which we perform sensitivity analysis involving vaccine efficacy, capacity, and hesitancy. We obtain numerical approximations for best strategies for vaccination, treatment, and social distancing measures and their effect on the spread of the virus. © 2021, Intercollegiate Biomathematics Alliance. All rights reserved.

6.
European Journal of Integrative Medicine ; 48, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1587783

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Chinese patent medicine (CPM) is an indispensable part of traditional Chinese medicine. Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) manifests is an acute respiratory infectious disease. This systematic review aimed to evaluate the therapeutic effects and safety of oral CPM for COVID-19. Methods: We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that tested oral CPM for the treatment of COVID-19 identified from publications in CNKI, Wanfang, VIP, Web of Science, SinoMed, PubMed, Embase, BioRxiv, MedRxiv and arXiv before November 2nd, 2020. The risk of bias for each trial was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool 2.0. RevMan 5.4 software was used for data analyses. The certainty of the evidence was assessed using the online GRADEpro tool. Results: Seven RCTs including 1079 participants were identified. The overall bias was assessed as “some concerns” for all included trials. Oral CPM investigated were: Lianhua Qingwen capsule/granules (连花清瘟胶囊/颗粒, LHQW), Jinhua Qinggan granules (金花清感颗粒, JHQG), Huoxiang Zhengqidripping pills (藿香正气滴丸, HXZQ), Toujie Quwen granules (透解祛瘟颗粒, TJQW) and Lianhua Qingke granules (连花清咳颗粒, LHQK). Compared with conventional western therapy alone for people with COVID-19: regarding the main outcomes, the results showed that oral CPM combined with conventional western therapy improved cure rate (RR = 1.20, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.38, involving LHQW and TJQW), reduced aggravation rate (RR = 0.50, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.85, involving LHQW, JHQG, LHQK and TJQW);with regard to additional outcomes, the results showed that add-on oral CPM shortened the duration of fever, cough and fatigue, improved the recovery rate of cough and fatigue, and increased the improvement and recovery rate of chest CT manifestations. There were some differences in therapeutic effects among various CPMs for the same COVID-19 outcome. The use of TJQW and LHQG appeared not to increase the risk of adverse events, but JHQG may cause mild diarrhea. Conclusions: Low-certainty or very low-certainty evidence demonstrated that oral CPM may have add-on potential therapeutic effects for patients with non-serious COVID-19. There are some differences in therapeutic effects between different oral CPMs for the same outcome of COVID-19. The use of TJQW and LHQG probably does not increase the risk of adverse events, but JHQG may cause mild diarrhea in patients. The conclusion of this review needs to be further confirmed by well-designed clinical trials with adequate sample sizes. Keywords: Coronavirus Disease 2019;COVID-19;Chinese patent medicine;Chinese herbal medicine;Systematic review;Meta-analysis

7.
European Journal of Integrative Medicine ; 48, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1587782

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an acute respiratory infectious disease. At present, there is no specific and effective therapy for the treatment and prevention of this disease. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has accumulated thousands of years of experience on the use of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) to prevent and treat infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to present the evidence on the therapeutic effects and safety of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) used with or without conventional western therapy for COVID-19. Methods: Clinical studies on the therapeutic effects and safety of CHM for COVID-19 were included. We summarized the general characteristics of included studies, evaluated methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) using the Cochrane risk of bias tool, analyzed the use of CHM, used Revman 5.4 software to present the risk ratio (RR) or mean difference (MD) and their 95% confidence interval (CI) to estimate the therapeutic effects and safety of CHM. Results: A total of 58 clinical studies were identified including RCTs (17.24%, 10), non-randomized controlled trials (1.72%, 1), retrospective studies with a control group (18.97%, 11), case-series (20.69%, 12) and case-reports (41.38%, 24). Fig.1 shows the flow diagram for the searching and screening of published articles. No RCTs of high methodological quality were identified. The most frequently tested oral Chinese patent medicine, Chinese herbal medicine injection or prescribed herbal decoction were: Lianhua Qingwen granule/capsule, Xuebijing injection and Maxing Shigan Tang. Table 1 lists the CHM used at least twice. In terms of aggravation rate, pooled analyses showed that there were statistical differences between the intervention group and the comparator group (RR 0.42, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.82, six RCTs;RR 0.38, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.64, five retrospective studies with a control group), that is, CHM plus conventional western therapy appeared better than conventional western therapy alone in reducing aggravation rate. In addition, compared with conventional western therapy, CHM plus conventional western therapy had potential advantages in increasing the recovery rate and shortening the duration of fever, cough and fatigue, improving the negative conversion rate of nucleic acid test, and increasing the improvement rate of chest CT manifestations and shortening the time from receiving the treatment to the beginning of chest CT manifestations improvement. For adverse events, pooled data showed that there were no statistical differences between the CHM and the control groups. Conclusion: Current low certainty evidence suggests that there may be a tendency that CHM plus conventional western therapy is superior to conventional western therapy alone. The use of CHM did not increase the risk of adverse events. Keywords: traditional Chinese medicine, Chinese herbal medicine, novel coronavirus pneumonia, coronavirus disease 2019, COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, review, clinical study

8.
Fulfilling the Sustainable Development Goals: On a Quest for a Sustainable World ; : 1-555, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1534414

ABSTRACT

This book contains assessment of the progress, or the lack of it, in implementing the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Through review of the assessments and of case studies, readers can draw lessons from the actions that could work to positively address the goals. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is designed to catalyze action in critical areas of importance to humanity and the planet. The effort to implement the SDGs, however, demands a sense of urgency in the face of environmental degradation, climate change, emerging conflicts, and growing inequality, among a number of other socio-economic problems. Five years after the launch of the 2030 Agenda, this book takes stock of how far the world has come and how we can position ourselves to achieve the global targets. The book is one of the first to assess how the implementation is impeded by the onset of COVID-19. It contains a special chapter on COVID-19 and the SDGs, while many thematic chapters on different SDGs also assess how COVID-19 adversely affects implementation, and what measures could be taken to minimize the adverse effects. This publication thus provides a fresh look at implementation of the SDGs highlighting impactful and creative actions that go beyond the business-as-usual development efforts. The volume reinforces this analysis with expert recommendations on how to support implementation efforts and achieve the SDGs through international and national strategies and the involvement of both the public and private sectors. The result is an indispensable textual tool for policy makers, academia, intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), as well as the public, as we march toward the 2030 deadline. © 2022 selection and editorial matter, Narinder Kakar, Vesselin Popovski, and Nicholas A. Robinson. All rights reserved.

9.
Global Advances in Health and Medicine ; 10:25-26, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1234518

ABSTRACT

Objective: We aimed to synthesize the current qualitative research evidence on health-care workers' perspective and experiences on the frontline, so as to listen to their need and to provide the support, and also to indicate a better management and policy for COVID-19 control and other similar outbreak. Methods: We conducted searching systematically in 6 English and Chinese databases including Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, SinoMed, Chinese Academic Conference Papers Database and Chinese Dissertation Database (Wan fang), Chinese Scientific Journal Database, MEDLINE, and EMBASE from December 20th 2019 to 29th May 2020. Data were extracted by two authors independently, and narrative reported the general characteristics and processed by thematic analysis and meta-ethnography. CASP (Critical Appraisal Skills Program) was used to assess the methodology quality. Results: 25 qualitative studies by in-depth interview with 882 health-care workers found out the perspective, experience, and mental condition of the health-care workers. The mental condition of health-care workers was very terrible and even influence their physical condition. Lack of clinical experience with infectious diseases is one of the main reasons to make health-care workers have negative feelings such as stress, anxiety, fear. Family's support would give a tremendous impact on health-care workers. The results demonstrated that sufficient training about infectious disease outbreak and psychological counseling for health-care workers were very important for further health service management. And for public health, government should pay more attention to disseminate knowledge of infectious diseases to the public. Conclusion: Health-care workers suffered from intense pressure in mental and physical level on the frontline during pandemic and support from family and government will be helpful.

10.
Global Advances in Health and Medicine ; 10:24-25, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1234517

ABSTRACT

Objective: To present the evidence of the effectiveness and safety of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) used with or without conventional western therapy on COVID-19. Methods: Clinical studies on effectiveness and safety of CHM for COVID-19 were included. We summarized general characteristics of included studies, evaluated methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), analyzed the use of CHM, estimated the effectiveness and safety of CHM. Results: A total of 58 clinical studies were identified including RCTs (17.24%, 10), non-randomized controlled trials (1.72%, 1), retrospective studies with a control group (18.97%, 11), case-series (20.69%, 12) and case-reports (41.38%, 24). No high methodological quality RCTs were identified. The most frequently tested Chinese patent medicine, Chinese herbal medicine injection or prescribed herbal decoction were: Lianhua Qingwen granule/capsule, Xuebijing injection and Maxing Shigan Tang. In terms of aggravation rate, pooled analyses showed that there had statistical differences between the intervention group and the comparator group (RR 0.42, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.82, 6 RCTs;RR 0.37, 95% CI 0.22 to 0.64, 4 retrospective studies with control group), that is, CHM plus conventional western therapy appeared better than conventional western therapy in reducing aggravation rate. In addition, compared with conventional western therapy, CHM plus conventional western therapy had potential advantages in increasing the resolution rate and shortening the duration of fever, cough and fatigue, improving the negative conversion rate of nucleic acid test, and increasing the number of patients with inflammatory disappearance or shortening the time from receiving treatment to beginning of inflammation disappearance. For adverse events, pooled data showed that there was no statistical difference between the CHM and the control groups. Conclusion: Current low certainty evidence suggests that there may be a tendency that CHM plus conventional western therapy is superior to conventional western therapy alone. The use of CHM did not increase the risk of adverse events.

11.
JTCVS Tech ; 5: 10-11, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1108803
12.
J Card Surg ; 36(5): 1668-1671, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1075864

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: First reported in December of 2019, the COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 has had a profound impact on the implementation of care. Here, we describe our institutional experience with a rapid influx of patients at the epicenter of the pandemic. METHODS: We retrospectively review our experience with the departments of cardiology, cardiothoracic surgery, anesthesia, and critical care medicine and summarize protocols developed in the midst of the pandemic. RESULTS: The rapid influx of patients requiring an intensive level of care required a complete restructuring of units, including the establishment of a new COVID-19 negative unit for the care of patients requiring urgent or emergent non-COVID-19 related care including open-heart surgery. This unique unit allowed for the delivery of safe and effective care in the epicenter of the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Here, we demonstrate the response of a large tertiary academic medical center to the COVID-19 pandemic. Specifically, we demonstrate how rapid structural changes can allow for the continued delivery of cardiac surgical care with similar outcomes as those reported before the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Humans , New York , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 34(1): 182-188, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1019911

ABSTRACT

As New York State quickly became the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic, innovative strategies to provide care for the COVID-19 negative patients with urgent or immediately life threatening cardiovascular conditions became imperative. To date, there has not been a focused analysis of patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, we seek to summarize the selection, screening, exposure/conversion, and recovery of patients undergoing cardiac surgery during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. We retrospectively reviewed a prospectively maintained institutional database for patients undergoing urgent or emergency cardiac surgery from March 16, 2020 to May 15, 2020, encompassing the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. All patients were operated on in a single institution in New York City. Preoperative demographics, imaging studies, intraoperative findings, and postoperative outcomes were reviewed. Between March 16, 2020 and May 15, 2020, a total of 54 adult patients underwent cardiac surgery. Five patients required reoperative sternotomy and cardiopulmonary bypass was utilized in 81% of cases. Median age was 64.3 (56.0; 75.3) years. Two patients converted to COVID-19 positive during the admission. There was one operative mortality (1.9%) associated with an acute perioperative COVID-19 infection. Median length of hospital stay was 5 days (4.0; 8.0) and 46 patients were discharged to home. There was 100% postoperative follow up and no patient had COVID-19 conversion following discharge. The delivery of cardiac surgical care was safely maintained in the midst of a global pandemic. The outcomes demonstrated herein suggest that with proper infection control, isolation, and patient selection, results similar to those observed in non-COVID series can be replicated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Adult , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/methods , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , United States
14.
The Annals of Thoracic Surgery ; 2020.
Article | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-277167

ABSTRACT

Recommendations for the safe and optimized resumption of cardiac surgery care, research and education during the SARS-CoV-2 era were developed by a cardiovascular research consortium, based in 19 countries and representing a wide spectrum of experience with COVID-19. This guidance document provides a framework for restarting cardiac surgery in the outpatient and inpatient settings, in accordance with the current understanding of SARS-CoV-2, the risks posed by interrupted cardiovascular care, and the available recommendations from major societies.

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