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1.
Thromb Haemost ; 2021 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592074

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is still unclear if patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have different rate, typology, and impact of thrombosis on survival. METHODS: In this multicentre observational cohort study 1.138 patients, hospitalized for CAP (n=559) or COVID-19 (n=579) from 7 clinical centres in Italy, were included in the study. Consecutive adult patients (age ≥18 years) with confirmed COVID-19 related pneumonia, with or without mechanical ventilation, hospitalized from 1st March 2020 to 30 April 2020, were enrolled. Covid-19 was diagnosed based on the WHO interim guidance. Patients were followed-up until discharge or in-hospital death, registering the occurrence of thrombotic events including ischemic/embolic events. RESULTS: During the in-hospital stay, 11.4% of CAP and 15.5% of COVID-19 patients experienced thrombotic events (p=0.046). In CAP patients all the events were arterial thromboses, while in COVID-19 patients 8.3% were venous and 7.2% arterial thromboses. During the in-hospital follow-up, 3% of CAP patients and 17% of COVID-19 patients died (p<0.001). The highest mortality rate was found among COVID-19 patients with thrombotic events (47.6% vs 13.4% in thrombotic-event free patients; p<0.001). In CAP, 13.8% of patients experiencing thrombotic events died vs. 1.8% of thrombotic event-free ones (p<0.001). A multivariable COX-regression analysis confirmed a higher risk of death in COVID-19 patients with thrombotic events (HR 2.1; 95% CI: 1.4-3.3; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with CAP, COVID-19 is characterized by a higher burden of thrombotic events, different thrombosis typology and higher risk of thrombosis-related in-hospital mortality.

2.
Diagnostics (Basel) ; 11(12)2021 Dec 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580956

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread worldwide causing a global pandemic. In this context, lung ultrasound (LUS) has played an important role due to its high diagnostic sensitivity, low costs, simplicity of execution and radiation safeness. Despite computed tomography (CT) being the imaging gold standard, lung ultrasound point of care exam is essential in every situation where CT is not readily available nor applicable. The aim of our review is to highlight the considerable versatility of LUS in diagnosis, framing the therapeutic route and follow-up for SARS-CoV-2 interstitial syndrome.

3.
J Transl Med ; 19(1): 491, 2021 12 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1551213

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nonthyroidal Illness Syndrome (NTIS) can be detected in many critical illnesses. Recently, we demonstrated that this condition is frequently observed in COVID-19 patients too and it is correlated with the severity the disease. However, the exact mechanism through which thyroid hormones influence the course of COVID-19, as well as that of many other critical illnesses, is not clear yet and treatment with T4, T3 or a combination of both is still controversial. Aim of this study was to analyze body composition in COVID-19 patients in search of possible correlation with the thyroid function. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We report here our experience performed in 74 critically ill COVID-19 patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) of our University Hospital in Rome. In these patients, we evaluated the thyroid hormone function and body composition by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) during the acute phase of the disease at admission in the ICU. To examine the effects of thyroid function on BIA parameters we analyzed also 96 outpatients, affected by thyroid diseases in different functional conditions. We demonstrated that COVID-19 patients with low FT3 serum values exhibited increased values of the Total Body Water/Free Fat Mass (TBW/FFM) ratio. Patients with the lowest FT3 serum values had also the highest level of TBW/FFM ratio. This ratio is an indicator of the fraction of FFM as water and represents one of the best-known body-composition constants in mammals. We found an inverse correlation between FT3 serum values and this constant. Reduced FT3 serum values in COVID-19 patients were correlated with the increase in the total body water (TBW), the extracellular water (ECW) and the sodium/potassium exchangeable ratio (Nae:Ke), and with the reduction of the intracellular water (ICW). No specific correlation was observed in thyroid patients at different functional conditions between any BIA parameters and FT3 serum values, except for the patient with myxedema, that showed a picture similar to that seen in COVID-19 patients with NTIS. Since the Na+/K+ pump is a well-known T3 target, we measured the mRNA expression levels of the two genes coding for the two major isoforms of this pump. We demonstrated that COVID-19 patients with NTIS had lower levels of mRNA of both genes in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC)s obtained from our patients during the acute phase of the disease. In addition, we retrieved data from transcriptome analysis, performed on human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM)s treated with T3 and we demonstrated that in these cells T3 is able to stimulate the expression of these two genes in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, we demonstrated that measurement of BIA parameters is a useful method to analyze water and salt retention in COVID-19 patients hospitalized in ICU and, in particular, in those that develop NTIS. Our results indicate that NTIS has peculiar similarities with myxedema seen in severe hypothyroid patients, albeit it occurs more rapidly. The Na+/K+ pump is a possible target of T3 action, involved in the pathogenesis of the anasarcatic condition observed in our COVID-19 patients with NTIS. Finally, measurement of BIA parameters may represent good endpoints to evaluate the benefit of future clinical interventional trials, based on the administration of T3 in patients with NTIS.

4.
Heart Lung ; 50(6): 926-932, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347620

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The family members of a patient admitted to a COVID Intensive Care Unit (COVID-ICU) could not communicate with and stay close to their loved one, which resulted in them becoming dependent on hospital staff for remote updates. OBJECTIVE: To describe the lived experiences of families with a member admitted to a COVID-ICU. METHODS: A phenomenological study was conducted. The subjects were interviewed with open-ended questions to allow them full freedom of expression. The researchers involved in the analysis immersed themselves in the data, independently reading and rereading the transcripts to gain a sense of the entire dataset. RESULTS: Fourteen first-degree family members were recruited. Five main themes emerged: fear, detachment, life on standby, family-related loneliness in the COVID-ICU, and an unexpected event. CONCLUSIONS: Knowing the experience of families who have a relative in the COVID-ICU is essential for recognizing and reducing the risk of developing symptoms of post-intensive care syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Family , Critical Illness , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Professional-Family Relations
5.
Cell Death Discov ; 7(1): 158, 2021 Jun 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297298

ABSTRACT

Ras gene family members play a relevant role in cancer, especially when they are mutated. However, they may play additional roles in other conditions beside cancer. We performed gene expression analysis using the NanoString PanCancer IO 360 panel in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) of six COVID-19 patients and we found that H-Ras gene was significantly upregulated, while both K-Ras and N-Ras genes were downregulated. In particular, H-Ras gene upregulation was more evident in COVID-19 patients with a more severe disease. We compared our results with those obtained by analyzing two different and independent datasets, including a total of 53 COVID-19 patients, in which the gene expression analysis was performed using the Immunology_V2 panel. Comparative analysis of the H-Ras gene expression in these patients confirmed our preliminary results. In both of them, in fact, we were able to confirm the upregulation of the expression of the H-Ras gene. The exact role of this specific upregulation of the H-Ras gene in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection and its possible role in cancer still remains to be elucidated. In conclusion, H-Ras gene participates to the host immune response to SARS-CoV-2 virus infection, especially in patients affected by the most severe form of the COVID-19.

6.
Intern Emerg Med ; 16(5): 1231-1237, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293431

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) may experience venous thrombosis while data regarding arterial thrombosis are sparse. METHODS: Prospective multicenter study in 5 hospitals including 373 patients with Covid-19-related pneumonia. Demographic data, laboratory findings including coagulation tests and comorbidities were reported. During the follow-up any arterial or venous thrombotic events and death were registered. RESULTS: Among 373 patients, 75 (20%) had a thrombotic event and 75 (20%) died. Thrombotic events included 41 venous thromboembolism and 34 arterial thrombosis. Age, cardiovascular disease, intensive care unit treatment, white blood cells, D-dimer, albumin and troponin blood levels were associated with thrombotic events. In a multivariable regression logistic model, intensive care unit treatment (Odds Ratio [OR]: 6.0; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 2.8-12.6; p < 0.001); coronary artery disease (OR: 2.4; 95% CI 1.4-5.0; p = 0.022); and albumin levels (OR: 0.49; 95% CI 0.28-0.87; p = 0.014) were associated with ischemic events. Age, sex, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, heart failure, coronary heart disease, intensive care unit treatment, in-hospital thrombotic events, D-dimer, C-reactive protein, troponin, and albumin levels were associated with mortality. A multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that in-hospital thrombotic events (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.72; 95% CI 1.59-4.65; p < 0.001), age (HR: 1.035; 95% CI 1.014-1.057; p = 0.001), and albumin (HR: 0.447; 95% CI 0.277-0.723; p = 0.001) predicted morality. CONCLUSIONS: Covid-19 patients experience an equipollent rate of venous and arterial thrombotic events, that are associated with poor survival. Early identification and appropriate treatment of Covid-19 patients at risk of thrombosis may improve prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Coronary Artery Disease/etiology , Mortality/trends , Thromboembolism/etiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Proportional Hazards Models , Prospective Studies , Thromboembolism/epidemiology
7.
JCI Insight ; 6(4)2021 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150281

ABSTRACT

BackgroundMitochondrial DNA (MT-DNA) are intrinsically inflammatory nucleic acids released by damaged solid organs. Whether circulating cell-free MT-DNA quantitation could be used to predict the risk of poor COVID-19 outcomes remains undetermined.MethodsWe measured circulating MT-DNA levels in prospectively collected, cell-free plasma samples from 97 subjects with COVID-19 at hospital presentation. Our primary outcome was mortality. Intensive care unit (ICU) admission, intubation, vasopressor, and renal replacement therapy requirements were secondary outcomes. Multivariate regression analysis determined whether MT-DNA levels were independent of other reported COVID-19 risk factors. Receiver operating characteristic and area under the curve assessments were used to compare MT-DNA levels with established and emerging inflammatory markers of COVID-19.ResultsCirculating MT-DNA levels were highly elevated in patients who eventually died or required ICU admission, intubation, vasopressor use, or renal replacement therapy. Multivariate regression revealed that high circulating MT-DNA was an independent risk factor for these outcomes after adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities. We also found that circulating MT-DNA levels had a similar or superior area under the curve when compared against clinically established measures of inflammation and emerging markers currently of interest as investigational targets for COVID-19 therapy.ConclusionThese results show that high circulating MT-DNA levels are a potential early indicator for poor COVID-19 outcomes.FundingWashington University Institute of Clinical Translational Sciences COVID-19 Research Program and Washington University Institute of Clinical Translational Sciences (ICTS) NIH grant UL1TR002345.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Cell-Free Nucleic Acids/blood , DNA, Mitochondrial/blood , Severity of Illness Index , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , ROC Curve , Renal Replacement Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use
8.
J Med Virol ; 93(7): 4319-4325, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118173

ABSTRACT

Teicoplanin has a potential antiviral activity expressed against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and was suggested as a complementary option to treat coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. In this multicentric, retrospective, observational research the aim was to evaluate the impact of teicoplanin on the course of COVID-19 in critically ill patients. Fifty-five patients with severe COVID-19, hospitalized in the intensive care units (ICUs) and treated with best available therapy were retrospectively analysed. Among them 34 patients were also treated with teicoplanin (Tei-COVID group), while 21 without teicoplanin (control group). Crude in-hospital Day-30 mortality was lower in Tei-COVID group (35.2%) than in control group (42.8%), however not reaching statistical significance (p = .654). No statistically significant differences in length of stay in the ICU were observed between Tei-COVID group and control group (p = .248). On Day 14 from the ICU hospitalization, viral clearance was achieved in 64.7% patients of Tei-COVID group and 57.1% of control group, without statistical difference. Serum C-reactive protein level was significantly reduced in Tei-COVID group compared to control group, but not other biochemical parameters. Finally, Gram-positive were the causative pathogens for 25% of BSIs in Tei-COVID group and for 70.6% in controls. No side effects related to teicoplanin use were observed. Despite several limitations require further research, in this study the use of teicoplanin is not associated with a significant improvement in outcomes analysed. The antiviral activity of teicoplanin against SARS-CoV-2, previously documented, is probably more effective at early clinical stages.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Hospital Mortality , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Teicoplanin/therapeutic use , Aged , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
9.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 110(4): e333-e334, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023473

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic pointed out that the need to ensure emergent surgery in patients positive for infection is no longer hypothetical. Among emergency procedures, thoracic surgical operations are frequent. A standardized surgical pathway is mandatory to achieve effective and safe management of this subset of patients. We briefly present the protocol adopted by our thoracic surgery division.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Guidelines as Topic , Health Facilities/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Thoracic Surgical Procedures/standards , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Front Chem ; 8: 590263, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1021883

ABSTRACT

The rapidly developing pandemic, known as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has recently spread across 213 countries and territories. This pandemic is a dire public health threat-particularly for those suffering from hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, pulmonary diseases, or diabetes; without approved treatments, it is likely to persist or recur. To facilitate the rapid discovery of inhibitors with clinical potential, we have applied ligand- and structure-based computational approaches to develop a virtual screening methodology that allows us to predict potential inhibitors. In this work, virtual screening was performed against two natural products databases, Super Natural II and Traditional Chinese Medicine. Additionally, we have used an integrated drug repurposing approach to computationally identify potential inhibitors of the main protease of SARS-CoV-2 in databases of drugs (both approved and withdrawn). Roughly 360,000 compounds were screened using various molecular fingerprints and molecular docking methods; of these, 80 docked compounds were evaluated in detail, and the 12 best hits from four datasets were further inspected via molecular dynamics simulations. Finally, toxicity and cytochrome inhibition profiles were computationally analyzed for the selected candidate compounds.

11.
Biochim Biophys Acta Mol Basis Dis ; 1867(3): 166042, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-978222

ABSTRACT

Immune dysregulation is a hallmark of patients infected by SARS-CoV2 and the balance between immune reactivity and tolerance is a key determinant of all stages of infection, including the excessive inflammatory state causing the acute respiratory distress syndrome. The kynurenine pathway (KP) of tryptophan (Trp) metabolism is activated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and drives mechanisms of immune tolerance. We examined the state of activation of the KP by measuring the Kyn:Trp ratio in the serum of healthy subjects (n = 239), and SARS-CoV2-negative (n = 305) and -positive patients (n = 89). Patients were recruited at the Emergency Room of St. Andrea Hospital (Rome, Italy). Kyn and Trp serum levels were assessed by HPLC/MS-MS. Compared to healthy controls, both SARS-CoV2-negative and -positive patients showed an increase in the Kyn:Trp ratio. The increase was larger in SARS-CoV2-positive patients, with a significant difference between SARS-CoV2-positive and -negative patients. In addition, the increase was more prominent in males, and positively correlated with age and severity of SARS-CoV2 infection, categorized as follows: 1 = no need for intensive care unit (ICU); 2 ≤ 3 weeks spent in ICU; 3 ≥ 3 weeks spent in ICU; and 4 = death. The highest Kyn:Trp values were found in SARS-CoV2-positive patients with severe lymphopenia. These findings suggest that the Kyn:Trp ratio reflects the level of inflammation associated with SARS-CoV2 infection, and, therefore, might represent a valuable biomarker for therapeutic intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Kynurenine/blood , Tryptophan/blood , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
13.
Cardiovasc Diabetol ; 19(1): 164, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-810407

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiometabolic disorders may worsen Covid-19 outcomes. We investigated features and Covid-19 outcomes for patients with or without diabetes, and with or without cardiometabolic multimorbidity. METHODS: We collected and compared data retrospectively from patients hospitalized for Covid-19 with and without diabetes, and with and without cardiometabolic multimorbidity (defined as ≥ two of three risk factors of diabetes, hypertension or dyslipidaemia). Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the risk of the primary composite outcome (any of mechanical ventilation, admission to an intensive care unit [ICU] or death) in patients with diabetes and in those with cardiometabolic multimorbidity, adjusting for confounders. RESULTS: Of 354 patients enrolled, those with diabetes (n = 81), compared with those without diabetes (n = 273), had characteristics associated with the primary composite outcome that included older age, higher prevalence of hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), higher levels of inflammatory markers and a lower PaO2/FIO2 ratio. The risk of the primary composite outcome in the 277 patients who completed the study as of May 15th, 2020, was higher in those with diabetes (Adjusted Odds Ratio (adjOR) 2.04, 95%CI 1.12-3.73, p = 0.020), hypertension (adjOR 2.31, 95%CI: 1.37-3.92, p = 0.002) and COPD (adjOR 2.67, 95%CI 1.23-5.80, p = 0.013). Patients with cardiometabolic multimorbidity were at higher risk compared to patients with no cardiometabolic conditions (adjOR 3.19 95%CI 1.61-6.34, p = 0.001). The risk for patients with a single cardiometabolic risk factor did not differ with that for patients with no cardiometabolic risk factors (adjOR 1.66, 0.90-3.06, adjp = 0.10). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with diabetes hospitalized for Covid-19 present with high-risk features. They are at increased risk of adverse outcomes, likely because diabetes clusters with other cardiometabolic conditions.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Metabolic Diseases/diagnosis , Metabolic Diseases/epidemiology , Metabolic Diseases/metabolism , Middle Aged , Multimorbidity/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract ; 169: 108454, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-778739

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To evaluate whether subjects with diabetes hospitalized for Coronavirus disease-19 (Covid-19) represent a subgroup of patients with high-risk clinical features compared to patients with diabetes without Covid-19. METHODS: In this case-control study 79 patients with type 2 diabetes out of 354 adults hospitalized for Covid-19 and 158 controls with type 2 diabetes but without Covid-19, matched for age and gender, were enrolled. Medical history and concomitant therapies were retrieved from medical charts and compared between cases and controls, controlling for confounders. RESULTS: Fully-adjusted multivariate logistic regression model showed that previous CVD history did not differ between patients with and without Covid-19 (odds ratio 1.40, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.59-3.32, p = 0.45). A higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR 3.72, 95%CI: 1.42-9.72, p = 0.007) and of chronic kidney disease (CKD) (OR 3.08, 95%CI: 1.18-8.06, p = 0.022) and a lower prevalence of ever smokers (OR 0.30, 95%CI: 0.13-0.67, p = 0.003), of users of lipid lowering agents (OR 0.26, 95%CI: 0.12-0.54, p < 0.001), and of anti-hypertensive drugs (OR 0.39, 95%CI: 0.16-0.93, p = 0.033) were found among cases. CONCLUSIONS: CVD prevalence does not differ between people with diabetes with and without Covid-19 requiring hospitalization. An increased prevalence of COPD and of CKD in Covid-19 patients with type 2 diabetes is suggested. These findings aid to clarify the relationship between underlying conditions and SARS-CoV-2 infection in the high-risk group of patients with diabetes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/pathology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/pathology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Incidence , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/virology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/virology
15.
Eur J Cardiothorac Surg ; 58(4): 676-681, 2020 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-732032

ABSTRACT

Early in 2020, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) quickly spread globally, giving rise to a pandemic. In this critical scenario, patients with lung cancer need to continue to receive optimal care and at the same be shielded from infection with the potentially severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Upgrades to the prevention and control of infection have become paramount in order to lower the risk of hospital contagion. Aerosol-generating procedures such as endotracheal intubation or endoscopic procedures may expose health care workers to a high risk of infection. Moreover, thoracic anaesthesia usually requires highly complex airway management procedures because of the need for one-lung isolation and one-lung ventilation. Therefore, in the current pandemic, providing a fast-track algorithm for scientifically standardized diagnostic criteria and treatment recommendations for patients with lung cancer is urgent. Suggestions for improving existing contagion control guidelines are needed, even in the case of non-symptomatic patients who possibly are responsible for virus spread. A COVID-19-specific intraoperative management strategy designed to reduce risk of infection in both health care workers and patients is also required.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/methods , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Infection Control/methods , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonectomy/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Airway Management/methods , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Italy , Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis , Patient Selection , Perioperative Care/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 34(12): 3203-3210, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-548491

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has quickly spread globally, causing a real pandemic. In this critical scenario, lung cancer patients scheduled for surgical treatment need to continue to receive optimal care while protecting them from an eventual severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. Adequate use of personal protective equipment (PPE) during aerosol-generating procedures (AGPs) and a COVID-19 specific intraoperative management are paramount in order to prevent cross infections. New suggestions or improvement of existing contagion control guidance are needed, even in case of non-symptomatic patients, possibly responsible for virus spread.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, Cardiac Procedures/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Anesthesia, Cardiac Procedures/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Humans , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Occupational Exposure/standards
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