Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480748

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between COVID-19 preventive behaviors, as the dependent variable, with risk perception, coping style and sense of coherence, as independent variables, in older people living in the community. METHODS: An observational design for predictive model development. This study was reported following the STROBE statement. The subjects were people over 65 years of age living in the community. Data collection included sociodemographic variables related to COVID-19, risk perception and types, coping styles in the face of contagion, sense of coherence, and preventive behaviors in the face of COVID-19. The data collection period was from November 2020 to January 2021. RESULTS: A total of 305 people participated in this study (71.5% women, mean age 71.34 years; 6.9% suffered from COVID-19 and 44.3% knew someone close to them who suffered from the virus). The coping style variables problem-focused, emotion-focused, and sense of coherence subscales Significance and manageability explained 17% of the variable preventive behaviors against COVID-19. There were statistically significant differences by gender in all subscales, with women scoring higher in all of them; Conclusions: Men with low risk perception, extrinsic risk perception, and low sense of coherence presented worse COVID-19 preventive behaviors. It would be interesting to develop specific prevention and health education campaigns for this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Behavior , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 25(2): 151-156, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190123

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many hazardous drugs (HDs) are excreted in urine and feces, and evidence has shown that bathrooms of patients receiving chemotherapy at home are contaminated with HDs. However, little information exists on bathroom contamination in ambulatory clinics where HDs are administered. OBJECTIVES: This project aimed to determine the presence of HD residue in the patient and staff bathrooms of an ambulatory cancer center. METHODS: A quality improvement project was initiated to examine potential contamination by the HDs 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in a patient bathroom and a secured badge-access staff bathroom in the infusion department of an ambulatory comprehensive cancer center. Twice-daily wipe testing was conducted on the floor in front of the toilet and the flush handle for five consecutive days. FINDINGS: Sixty-five percent of the samples from the floor of the patient bathroom were positive for at least one of the HDs. In the staff bathroom, 35% of the floor samples were positive for at least one HD. None of the flush handle samples were above the level of detection.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents , Neoplasms , Antineoplastic Agents/toxicity , Drug Contamination , Fluorouracil/toxicity , Humans , Neoplasms/drug therapy , Oxaliplatin/toxicity , Toilet Facilities
3.
Eur J Trauma Emerg Surg ; 47(3): 683-692, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1141395

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To analyse acute cholecystitis (AC) management during the first pandemic outbreak after the recommendations given by the surgical societies estimating: morbidity, length of hospital stay, mortality and hospital-acquired SARS-CoV-2 infection rate. METHODS: Multicentre-combined (retrospective-prospective) cohort study with AC patients in the Community of Madrid between 1st March and 30th May 2020. 257 AC patients were involved in 16 public hospital. Multivariant binomial logistic regression (MBLR) was applied to mortality. RESULTS: Of COVID-19 patients, 30 were diagnosed at admission and 12 patients were diagnosed during de admission or 30 days after discharge. In non-COVID-19 patients, antibiotic therapy was received in 61.3% of grade I AC and 40.6% of grade II AC. 52.4% of grade III AC were treated with percutaneous drainage (PD). Median hospital stay was 5 [3-8] days, which was higher in the non-surgical treatment group with 7.51 days (p < 0.001) and a 3.25% of mortality rate (p < 0.21). 93.3% of patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection at admission were treated with non-surgical treatment (p = 0.03), median hospital stay was 11.0 [7.5-27.5] days (p < 0.001) with a 7.5% of mortality rate (p > 0.05). In patients with hospital-acquired SARS-CoV-2 infection, 91.7% of grade I-II AC were treated with non-surgical treatment (p = 0.037), with a median hospital stay of 16 [4-21] days and a 18.2% mortality rate (p > 0.05). Hospital-acquired infection risk when hospital stay is > 7 days is OR 4.7, CI 95% (1.3-16.6), p = 0.009. COVID-19 mortality rate was 11.9%, AC severity adjusted OR 5.64 (CI 95% 1.417-22.64). In MBLR analysis, age (OR 1.15, CI 95% 1.02-1.31), SARS-CoV-2 infection (OR 14.49, CI 95% 1.33-157.81), conservative treatment failure (OR 8.2, CI 95% 1.34-50.49) and AC severity were associated with an increased odd of mortality. CONCLUSION: In our population, during COVID-19 pandemic, there was an increase of non-surgical treatment which was accompanied by an increase of conservative treatment failure, morbidity and hospital stay length which may have led to an increased risk hospital-acquired SARS-CoV-2 infection. Age, SARS-CoV-2 infection, AC severity and conservative treatment failure were mortality risk factors.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Cholecystectomy/statistics & numerical data , Cholecystitis, Acute , Conservative Treatment , Cross Infection , Infection Control , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cholecystitis, Acute/diagnosis , Cholecystitis, Acute/epidemiology , Cholecystitis, Acute/therapy , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Conservative Treatment/methods , Conservative Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/virology , Drainage/methods , Drainage/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infection Control/standards , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology
4.
J Adv Nurs ; 77(2): 869-878, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-910375

ABSTRACT

AIM: To explore the emotional impact and experiences of geriatric nurses working in nursing homes and caring for patients with coronavirus 2019 disease (COVID-19). DESIGN: This is a qualitative study with phenomenological method and data were gathered through in-depth interview. METHODS: The experiences and expectations that nurses are facing during their care duties were explored via video conference, using a semi-structured interview guide. We have followed the Consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research COREQ. RESULTS: Interviews (N=24) were conducted with nurses from four countries (Spain, Italy, Peru, and Mexico) during April 2020. Three main categories were extracted: fear of the pandemic situation, the sense of duty and professional commitment, and emotional exhaustion. CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of the country and situation, in the face of the pandemic, dramatic situations have been experienced in nursing homes worldwide, with nursing staff feeling exhausted and overwhelmed, and reflection is urged on a global level to consider the most appropriate model of care in nursing homes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/psychology , Geriatric Nursing , Nursing Care/psychology , Nursing Homes , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Mexico/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Peru/epidemiology , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology
5.
Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences ; 7(2):123-131, 2020.
Article | Sage | ID: covidwho-814540

ABSTRACT

Pregnant women and new mothers experience numerous biases: they are inappropriately touched, less likely to be hired or promoted, paid less, and subjected to a host of stereotypes. Pregnant women and mothers are perceived as warm and maternal, but also incompetent and uncommitted. If they return to work, they are perceived as cold, but still incompetent, and uncommitted. These stigmas worsen when pregnant women are heavier, as weight-based stigmas add additional biases. This article explores the overlapping stigmas of pregnancy, motherhood, and weight in the workplace and higher education. Each has implications for policies. Addressing the stigmas for pregnant women and mothers will increase diversity in the workforce and higher education. The COVID-19 pandemic brings additional pressures on pregnant women and mothers.

6.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 7: 462, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-769222

ABSTRACT

The University Hospital of Salamanca, in Spain, had its first COVID-19 case on March 1st and as of May 11th, we had 1,100 positive cases. Based on the vulnerability of patients with blood cancers, on March 9th, the Hematology Department developed a protocol, amended as the new information was available, to maintain the Hematology Unit as a "free COVID-19 island." The protocol included symptom-based surveys and screening tests to patients, caregivers, and healthcare personnel to identify early potential positive cases and prevent its spread. Between March 9 and April 28, 32 asymptomatic patients and caregivers were tested and 68 rT-PCR diagnostic assays have been performed with two positive results. A 106 healthcare workers have been tested (208 rT-PCR) and seven of them were positive. In summary, the implementation of preemptive measures after the first case appeared allowed us to be able to provide treatment to our patients.

7.
Cir Esp (Engl Ed) ; 98(9): 525-532, 2020 Nov.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-271517

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The spread of the SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19) has required adaptation by hospitals affected by the pandemic, which has caused a reduction in elective surgical activity. METHODS: Retrospective study of patients operated on in the previous month and during the peak of the pandemic. We analysed the COVID-19 infection rate, the severity of respiratory infection according to the Brescia respiratory COVID-19 severity scale, the adopted therapeutic measures and the overall postoperative complications. RESULTS: From 17th February to 31st March 2020, there was a progressive decrease in surgical activity, with only 213 patients operated on. This comprised 59 (27.8%) elective operations for oncological diseases, 97 (45.5%) elective operations for benign diseases and 57 (26.7%) as urgent procedures.There was a progressive increase in the rate of infection by COVID-19, with a total of 15 cases (7%). This included 10 patients (16.9%) in the elective group for oncological disease, 1 (1%) in the elective surgery group for benign disease and 4 (7%) in the urgent surgery group (p < 0.001). Five patients presented with a severe respiratory infection, of which 4 were affected by oncological disease. There were 3 deaths (1.4%), which were all due to the worsening of a respiratory infection. CONCLUSIONS: The patients undergoing the surgical procedures showed high rates of COVID-19 infection and postoperative complications, especially the patients with oncological diseases. Local resumption of surgical activity must be based on the prioritisation of the cases to be operated on, respecting certain premises of security and optimisation of the available resources.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Selection , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Analysis
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL