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1.
J Arthroplasty ; 37(3): 431-437.e3, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1682921

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We conducted a randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) delivered via a mobile phone messaging robot to patients who had their total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty procedures postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Ninety patients scheduled for total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty who experienced surgical delay due to the COVID-19 pandemic were randomized to the ACT group, receiving 14 days of twice daily automated mobile phone messages, or the control group, who received no messages. Minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs) in preintervention and postintervention patient-reported outcome measures were utilized to evaluate the intervention. RESULTS: Thirty-eight percent of ACT group participants improved and achieved MCID on the Patient-Reported Outcome Measure Information System Physical Health compared to 17.5% in the control group (P = .038; number needed to treat [NNT] 5). For the joint-specific Hip Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score Joint Replacement and Knee Disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score Joint Replacement (KOOS JR), 24% of the ACT group achieved MCID compared to 2.5% in the control group (P = .004; NNT 5). An improvement in the KOOS JR was found in 29% of the ACT group compared to 4.2% in the control group (P = .028; NNT 5). Fourteen percent of the ACT group participants experienced a clinical important decline in the KOOS JR compared to 41.7% in the control group (P = .027; NNT 4). CONCLUSION: A psychological intervention delivered via a text messaging robot improved physical function and prevented decline in patient-reported outcome measures in patients who experienced an unexpected surgical delay during the COVID-19 pandemic. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 1.


Subject(s)
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , COVID-19 , Cell Phone , Osteoarthritis, Knee , Humans , Osteoarthritis, Knee/surgery , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Foot Ankle Orthop ; 6(2): 24730114211013788, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496122

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the development of the COVID-19 pandemic, elective foot and ankle surgeries were delayed throughout the United States to divert health care resources and limit exposure. Little is known about the impact of COVID-19 on patient's willingness to proceed with elective procedures once restrictions are lifted and factors contributing to such decision. METHODS: Patients across 6 US orthopedic institutions who had their elective foot and ankle surgeries cancelled secondary to the pandemic were given a questionnaire. Specifically, patients were asked about their willingness to move forward with surgery once restrictions were lifted and if not why. Pain-level and pain medication use were also assessed. Univariate analysis was used to identify factors that contribute to patient's decisions. RESULTS: A total of 150 patients participated in this study. Twenty-one (14%) opted not to proceed with surgery once restrictions were lifted. Forty-three percent (n = 9) listed concern for COVID infection as the reason; however, 14% of them would proceed if procedures were performed in surgery center. Twenty-nine (19% of the total cohort) patients had increased pain and 11% of patients were taking more pain meds because of the delay to their procedure. Patients who decided not to proceed with surgery reported pain reduction (3% vs 14%) and lower increase in pain medication used (5% vs 12%). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 has made a significant impact on the health care system. Delay of elective foot and ankle procedures impact patient quality of life and outcomes. Access to surgery centers may provide a partial solution during the pandemic. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III.

3.
Crit Care Explor ; 3(10): e547, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470172

ABSTRACT

To assess 30-day mortality in coronavirus disease 2019 acute respiratory distress syndrome patients transferred from rural Appalachian hospitals. DESIGN: Retrospective case controlled, based on consecutive patients transferred and admitted from rural hospitals to a tertiary-care ICU. The primary outcome was all-cause 30-day mortality. Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test were used in the survival data analysis. SETTING: Medical ICU, West Virginia University Hospital, Morgantown, WV. PATIENTS: All adult patients admitted to the ICU for coronavirus disease 2019 disease between September 30, 2020, and December 2, 2020. INTERVENTION: Not applicable. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Seventy-nine consecutive coronavirus disease 2019 patients were admitted to the ICU during the defined period. Overall mortality of the cohort was 54%. Of the 79 patients, 50 were transferred from critical access hospitals/rural facilities with coronavirus disease 2019-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome. A control group consisted of 39 patients admitted to the ICU with noncoronavirus disease 2019 acute respiratory distress syndrome who were intubated and mechanically ventilated. Thirty-day mortality in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 admitted to the ICU was significantly higher than the control group (68% vs 42%) (p = 0.034). Mean Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores were similar in both coronavirus disease 2019 acute respiratory distress syndrome group and controls. Intubation in patients 70 years or older and mechanical ventilation for over 5 days was associated with significantly higher mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Our data on critically ill and mechanically ventilated coronavirus disease 2019 acute respiratory distress syndrome patients transferred from critical access hospitals/rural facilities have increased mortality compared with noncoronavirus disease 2019 acute respiratory distress syndrome controls. These data suggest that lack or delay in access to tertiary care may impact coronavirus disease 2019 outcome in rural areas. Intubated patients 70 years old or more and mechanical ventilation for over 5 days may be a risk factor for increased mortality. These data may help physicians and hospital administrators in rural areas for optimal utilization of limited resources.

4.
Arthroplast Today ; 7: 268-272, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1131087

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, elective total hip and knee arthroplasty (THA and TKA) were suspended across the United States in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. We had previously published the results of a survey to the affected patients from 6 institutions. We now present the results of a larger distribution of this survey, through May and June 2020, to electively scheduled patients representing different regions of the United States. METHODS: Fifteen centers identified through the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons Research Committee participated in a survey study of THA and TKA patients. Patients scheduled for primary elective THA or TKA but canceled due to the COVID-19 elective surgery stoppage (3/2020-5/2020) were included in the study. Descriptive statistics along with subgroup analysis with Wilcoxon rank were performed. RESULTS: In total, surveys were distributed to 2135 patients and completed by 848 patients (40%) from 15 institutions. Most patients (728/848, 86%) had their surgery postponed or canceled by the surgeon or hospital. Unknown length of surgical delay remained the highest source of anxiety among survey participants. Male patients were more likely to be willing to proceed with surgery in spite of COVID-19. There were minimal regional differences in responses. Only 61 patients (7%) stated they will continue to delay surgery for fear of contracting COVID-19 while in the hospital. CONCLUSION: Similar to the previous study, the most anxiety-provoking thought was the uncertainty, over if and when the canceled joint replacement surgery could be rescheduled. Patients suffering from the daily pain of hip and knee arthritis who have been scheduled for elective arthroplasty remain eager to have their operation as soon as elective surgery is allowed to resume.

5.
J Arthroplasty ; 35(7S): S49-S55, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-102140

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitals in the United States were recommended to stop performing elective procedures. This stoppage has led to the cancellation of a large number of hip and knee arthroplasties. The effect of this on patients' physical mental and economic health is unknown. METHODS: A survey was developed by the AAHKS Research Committee to assess pain, anxiety, physical function, and economic ability of patients to undergo a delayed operation. Six institutions conducted the survey to 360 patients who had to have elective hip and knee arthroplasty cancelled between March and July of 2020. RESULTS: Patients were most anxious about the uncertainty of when their operation could be rescheduled. Although 85% of patients understood and agreed with the public health measures to curb infections, almost 90% of patients plan to reschedule as soon as possible. Age and geographic region of the patients affected their anxiety. Younger patients were more likely to have financial concerns and concerns about job security. Patients in the Northeast were more concerned about catching COVID-19 during a future hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: Patients suffering from the pain of hip and knee arthritis continue to struggle with pain from their end-stage disease. They have anxiety about the COVID-19 pandemic. Few patients feel they will be limited financially and 90% want to have surgery as soon as possible. Age and physical location of the patients affect their causes for anxiety around their future surgery.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/statistics & numerical data , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
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