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Allergy: European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology ; 76(SUPPL 110):207, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1570352

ABSTRACT

Background: According to current evidence, the lungs are the most affected organ in SARS-CoV-2 infection. Recent data shows impairment of carbon monoxide diffusing capacity, decreased total lung capacity, and restrictive ventilatory defect in COVID-19 adult patients. Data in children are lacking. Our goal was to characterize clinically and demographically the pediatric population with asthma that tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 in our hospital during 2020 and evaluate the pulmonary function after the infection. Method: Cross-sectional study performed in Hospital Dona Estefânia, from March 2nd to December 31st, 2020. All pediatric asthmatic patients (<18 years) who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 (RT-PCR test) were included. Asthma diagnosis was based on a previous physician's diagnosis or parent-reported history. A convenience sample of the asthmatic patients performed spirometry and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO). Results: We were able to identify 20 asthmatic patients [50% male;median age: 10.5 years old (P25- 75: 9- 14.5)]. Atopic comorbidities were present in 75% ( n = 15) (rhinitis the most frequent). According to GINA, 11 (55%) had mild and 9 (45%) moderate asthma. Five patients (25%) needed hospital admission because of COVID-19 infection, 3 had asthma exacerbation, and 3 had COVID-19 pneumonia. Nine of the 20 patients performed spirometry and DLCO after COVID-19 infection. Respiratory function was performed few months after the infection [median=3 months (P25- 75: 2- 6.5)]. In our sample, we found 2 patients with obstructive ventilation impairment and small airway dysfunction. We didn't find any statistically significant difference between de FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC ratio, FEF25- 75, and peak expiratory flow (PEF) before and after COVID-19 infection. There were 2 asthmatics with impaired DLCO (65.1% and 64.7%). Conclusion: Two patients showed obstructive ventilation, but it could be due to the variable airflow limitation of asthma, and 2 had DLCO impairment. We didn't find any statistically significant difference between respiratory function before and after COVID-19 infection. However, this is a small sample, and further evaluations with larger populations are needed.

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