Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Sleep Science ; 15:55, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1935283

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Previous studies have reported that sleep deprivation and sleep disorders may decrease the antibody response after vaccination for H1N1, influenza and hepatitis A. Since the emergence of the current pandemic, the same was wondered for vaccination against COVID-19. This possible effect would be especially relevant among older adults, who are subjected to a high prevalence of sleep disorders (mainly obstructive sleep apnea - OSA) and who are at increased risk for severe COVID-19. Objective: To evaluate the effect of OSA on IgG antibody response after vaccination against COVID-19 among older adults. Methods: This study was based on a convenience sample of older adults who underwent polysomnography at the Sleep Institute (São Paulo, Brazil). It was considered eligible those who were 60 years or older, were undergoing full night type-I polysomnography, and have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19. The following exclusion criteria was applied: previous COVID-19 diagnosis, less than 15 days between last vaccine shot and IgG testing, or CPAP use in the last 3 months. All eligible participants undergone blood sampling for anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG analysis. The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) was used to categorize the participants in the following groups: no/mild OSA (IAH < 15), moderate OSA (AHI ≥ 15 and < 30) and severe OSA (AHI ≥ 30). The association between IgG reactive status (seronegative or seropositive) and OSA was evaluated by a X2 test. Log-transformed IgG levels were compared among OSA severity groups using a 1-way ANOVA with Welch's correction. Statistical analyses were performed using Jamovi 1.6 and the significance level was set as p<0.05. Results: The final sample comprised 122 participants, of which 35 had no/mild OSA, 31 had moderate and 56 had severe OSA. Seronegative anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG results were observed in 9.8% of the sample, and the median IgG levels was 273 AU/ mL (IQR: 744) with no statistically significant differences among OSA severity groups in neither case. Conclusion: OSA does not appear to affect IgG antibody response following vaccination against older adults. This is a positive result from a public health perspective, since even being at increased risk for negative COVID-19 outcomes, vaccination among individuals with OSA seems to be equally effective as among those without OSA.

2.
Acs Applied Nano Materials ; 4(12):8, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1586049

ABSTRACT

The successful development of multifunctional cotton fabrics with antimicrobial and antiviral activities is essential to prevent the proliferation of microorganisms and transmission of coronavirus virions today, especially with the emergence of new variants of SARS-CoV-2. In this work, we developed antimicrobial cotton fabrics with Ag/TiO2 nanoparticles synthesized via sonochemistry. Here, we show that more than 50% of infectious SARS-CoV-2 remain active after prolonged direct contact self-disinfecting materials capable of inhibiting the proliferation of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The findings bring several epidemiologic worries about using silver and TiO2 as self-disinfecting nanostructured agents to prevent coronavirus transmission.

3.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-295452

ABSTRACT

Background CoronaVac is an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine that has been rolled out in several low and middle-income countries including Brazil, where it was the mainstay of the first wave of immunization of health care workers and the elderly population. We aimed to assess the T cell and antibody responses of vaccinees as compared to convalescent subjects. Methods We detected IgG against SARS-CoV-2 antigens, neutralizing antibodies against the original SARS-CoV-2 strain, and used SARS-CoV-2 peptides to detect IFN-g and IL-2 specific T cell responses in a cohort of CoronaVac vaccinees (N=101) and convalescent (N=72) individuals. Findings Among vaccinees, 95% displayed T cell or antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 as compared to 99% convalescent individuals. However, we observed that among vaccinees, males and individuals 55 years or older developed significantly lower anti-RBD, anti-NP and neutralizing antibody responses as well as antigen-induced IL-2 production by T cells. Interpretation Even though some studies indicated Coronavac helped reduce mortality among elderly people, considering the current dominance of the gamma variant of concern (VOC) and potential increase of the delta VOC, in Brazil, our data support that Coronavac vaccinees above 55 years old Coronavac vaccinees above 55 years old could benefit from a heterologous third dose/booster vaccine to improve immune response and protection. Funding Brazilian Ministry for Science, Technology and Innovation, Sao Paulo State Foundation for Scientific research (FAPESP), JBS S.A.

4.
Vaccine ; 38(28): 4464-4475, 2020 06 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-133338

ABSTRACT

The 2013-2016 West Africa EBOV epidemic was the biggest EBOV outbreak to date. An analysis of virus-specific CD8+ T-cell immunity in 30 survivors showed that 26 of those individuals had a CD8+ response to at least one EBOV protein. The dominant response (25/26 subjects) was specific to the EBOV nucleocapsid protein (NP). It has been suggested that epitopes on the EBOV NP could form an important part of an effective T-cell vaccine for Ebola Zaire. We show that a 9-amino-acid peptide NP44-52 (YQVNNLEEI) located in a conserved region of EBOV NP provides protection against morbidity and mortality after mouse adapted EBOV challenge. A single vaccination in a C57BL/6 mouse using an adjuvanted microsphere peptide vaccine formulation containing NP44-52 is enough to confer immunity in mice. Our work suggests that a peptide vaccine based on CD8+ T-cell immunity in EBOV survivors is conceptually sound and feasible. Nucleocapsid proteins within SARS-CoV-2 contain multiple Class I epitopes with predicted HLA restrictions consistent with broad population coverage. A similar approach to a CTL vaccine design may be possible for that virus.


Subject(s)
Drug Design , Ebola Vaccines/immunology , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology , Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/immunology , Vaccines, Subunit/immunology , Viral Vaccines , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Models, Animal , Ebola Vaccines/chemistry , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/chemistry , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/immunology , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/prevention & control , Humans , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Vaccines, Subunit/chemistry , Viral Vaccines/chemistry , Viral Vaccines/immunology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL