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1.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(7): e2220677, 2022 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1919182

ABSTRACT

Importance: Health care workers face serious mental health challenges as a result of ongoing work stress. The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated that stress, resulting in high rates of anxiety, depression, and burnout. To date, few evidence-based programs targeting mental health outcomes in health care workers have been described. Objective: To assess the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes of a skills-based coaching program designed to reduce stress and build resilience. Design, Setting, and Participants: A pilot cohort study was conducted between September 2020 and April 2021 using preprogram and postprogram assessments and a mixed-methods analysis. Duration of follow-up was 7 weeks. The coaching program was delivered via video conferencing. Participants were health care workers and staff from a large urban health system. Intervention: The Promoting Resilience in Stress Management (PRISM) program, a manualized, skills-based coaching program originally developed for adolescents and young adults with serious/chronic illness, was adapted to support health care workers and staff ("PRISM at Work"). It included 6 weekly 1-hour group sessions. Main Outcomes and Measures: Feasibility was defined a priori as 70% completion rates. Acceptability was defined quantitatively (satisfaction scores) and qualitatively (open-ended questions regarding experience with program). Preliminary outcomes were assessed with preprogram and post program assessments of self-reported resilience, stress, anxiety, and burnout using validated instruments. Descriptive statistics summarized demographic variables and feasibility and acceptability. Linear mixed effects regression models examined preliminary outcomes, controlling for relevant covariates. Results: A total of 153 participants (median [SD] age, 40.6 [10.1] years; 142 [92%] were female; 128 [84%] identified as having White race; 81 [53%] were in patient-facing roles) enrolled. Of the 132 health care workers who provided follow-up surveys, 120 (91%) had completed the program, and 116 (88%) reported being satisfied. Answers to open-ended questions suggested that participants wanted more PRISM either with longer or additional sessions. Participant-reported resilience (ß = 1.74; 95% CI, 1.00-2.48), stress (ß = -2.40; 95% CI, -3.28 to -1.51), anxiety (ß = -2.04; 95% CI, -2.74 to -1.34), and burnout-exhaustion (ß = -0.37; 95% CI, -0.56 to -0.18) improved after the program. Conclusions and Relevance: Results of this study suggest that PRISM at Work may have utility for health care workers and staff in that the program was found to be feasible, acceptable, and associated with improved outcomes.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Resilience, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Personnel, Hospital , Pilot Projects , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Young Adult
2.
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs ; 2022 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1878777

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic poses risk for worsened quality of life in patients with adult congenital heart disease. In a qualitative thematic analysis of semi-structured interviews conducted July 2020 to August 2021, we examined the pandemic's impact on participants' (N = 25) experiences with self-perception and coping. All had moderate or complex disease; median age 32 years. The pandemic altered some participants' self-perception, including increased vulnerability beyond heart-attributed risk. Restrictions frequently prevented participants from using their usual coping strategies, forcing use of alternative methods. For an already at-risk population, these findings suggest the need for increased mental health awareness, assessment, and support.

3.
Pediatric e-journal ; 63:26-30, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1623931
4.
JMIR Ment Health ; 8(8): e30098, 2021 Aug 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376667

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Children, adolescents, and young adults with chronic conditions experience difficulties coping with disease-related stressors, comorbid mental health problems, and decreased quality of life. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a global mental health crisis, and telemental health has necessarily displaced in-person care. However, it remains unknown whether such remote interventions are feasible or efficacious. We aimed to fill this research-practice gap. OBJECTIVE: In this systematic review, we present a synthesis of studies examining the feasibility and efficacy of telemental health interventions for youth aged ≤25 years with chronic illnesses. METHODS: PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, PsycInfo, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched from 2008 to 2020. We included experimental, quasiexperimental, and observational studies of telemental health interventions designed for children, adolescents, and young adults aged ≤25 years with chronic illnesses, in which feasibility or efficacy outcomes were measured. Only English-language publications in peer-reviewed journals were included. We excluded studies of interventions for caregivers or health care providers, mental health problems not in the context of a chronic illness, disease and medication management, and prevention programs for healthy individuals. RESULTS: We screened 2154 unique study records and 109 relevant full-text articles. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria, and they represented seven unique telemental health interventions. Five of the studies included feasibility outcomes and seven included efficacy outcomes. All but two studies were pilot studies with relatively small sample sizes. Most interventions were based on cognitive behavioral therapy and problem-solving therapy. The subset of studies examining intervention feasibility concluded that telemental health interventions were appropriate, acceptable, and satisfactory to patients and their parents. Technology did not create barriers in access to care. For the subset of efficacy studies, evidence in support of the efficacy of telemental health was mixed. Significant heterogeneity in treatment type, medical diagnoses, and outcomes precluded a meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS: The state of the science for telemental health interventions designed for youth with chronic illnesses is in a nascent stage. Early evidence supports the feasibility of telehealth-based delivery of traditional in-person interventions. Few studies have assessed efficacy, and current findings are mixed. Future research should continue to evaluate whether telemental health may serve as a sustainable alternative to in-person care after the COVID pandemic.

5.
Palliat Support Care ; 19(2): 129-134, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253858

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Parents of seriously ill children worry about their vulnerable child contracting COVID-19, whether their child's palliative care providers will be able to continue to provide the same quality of care to their child, and who can be with the child to provide comfort. For providers, shifts in healthcare provision, communication formats, and support offerings for families facing distress or loss during the pandemic may promote providers' moral distress. This study aimed to define the ways that the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted end-of-life care and approach to bereavement care in pediatric palliative care (PPC). METHOD: The Palliative Assessment of Needed DEvelopments and Modifications In the Era of Coronavirus (PANDEMIC) survey was developed to learn about the PPC experience during COVID-19 in the United States. The survey was posted with permission on seven nationally focused Listservs. RESULTS: A total of 207 PPC team members from 80 cities within 39 states and the District of Columbia participated. In the majority of hospitals, admitted pediatric patients were only allowed one parent as a visitor with the exception of both parents or nuclear family at end of life. Creative alternatives to grief support and traditional funeral services were described. The high incidence of respondents' depicted moral distress was often focused on an inability to provide a desired level of care due to existing rules and policies and bearing witness to patient and family suffering enhanced by the pandemic. SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound impact on the provision of end-of-life care and bereavement for children, family caregivers, and PPC providers. Our results identify tangible limitations of restricted personal contact and the pain of watching families stumble through a stunted grieving process. It is imperative that we find solutions for future global challenges and to foster solidarity in PPC.


Subject(s)
Bereavement , COVID-19/psychology , Family/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Social Support , Terminal Care/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , Child , Female , Hospice Care , Humans , Male , Palliative Care/psychology , United States
6.
Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book ; 41: e13-e19, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249567

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and the simultaneous increased focus on structural racism and racial/ethnic disparities across the United States have shed light on glaring inequities in U.S. health care, both in oncology and more generally. In this article, we describe how, through the lens of fundamental ethical principles, an ethical imperative exists for the oncology community to overcome these inequities in cancer care, research, and the oncology workforce. We first explain why this is an ethical imperative, centering the discussion on lessons learned during 2020. We continue by describing ongoing equity-focused efforts by ASCO and other related professional medical organizations. We end with a call to action-all members of the oncology community have an ethical responsibility to take steps to address inequities in their clinical and academic work-and with guidance to practicing oncologists looking to optimize equity in their research and clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Health Equity/statistics & numerical data , Health Status Disparities , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Medical Oncology/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , Racism/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Health Equity/ethics , Healthcare Disparities/ethics , Humans , Medical Oncology/ethics , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pandemics , Public Health/ethics , Public Health/methods , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , Racism/ethics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , United States
7.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 62(3): e91-e99, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157541

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: The coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has profoundly impacted the provision of pediatric palliative care (PPC) interventions including goals of care discussions, symptom management, and end-of-life care. OBJECTIVE: Gaining understanding of the professional and personal experiences of PPC providers on a global scale during COVID-19 is essential to improve clinical practices in an ongoing pandemic. METHODS: The Palliative Assessment of Needed DEvelopments & Modifications In the Era of Coronavirus Survey-Global survey was designed and distributed to assess changes in PPC practices resulting from COVID-19. Quantitative and qualitative data were captured through the survey. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty-six providers were included in the final analysis with 59 countries and six continents represented (31% from lower- or lower middle-income countries). Nearly half of PPC providers (40%) reported programmatic economic insecurity or employment loss. Use of technology influenced communication processes for nearly all participants (91%), yet most PPC providers (72%) reported receiving no formal training in use of technological interfaces. Respondents described distress around challenges in provision of comfort at the end of life and witnessing patients' pain, fear, and isolation. CONCLUSIONS: PPC clinicians from around the world experienced challenges related to COVID-19. Technology was perceived as both helpful and a hinderance to high quality communication. The pandemic's financial impact translated into concerns about programmatic sustainability and job insecurity. Opportunities exist to apply these important experiential lessons learned to improve and sustain care for future patients, families, and interdisciplinary teams. ARTICLE SUMMARY: This original article describes the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on pediatric palliative care clinicians from 59 countries including financial losses, use of virtual communication modalities, and the respondents' distress in provision of comfort at the end of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospice Care , Child , Humans , Palliative Care , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
J Clin Oncol ; 39(2): 155-169, 2021 01 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013168

ABSTRACT

This report presents the American Society of Clinical Oncology's (ASCO's) evaluation of the adaptations in care delivery, research operations, and regulatory oversight made in response to the coronavirus pandemic and presents recommendations for moving forward as the pandemic recedes. ASCO organized its recommendations for clinical research around five goals to ensure lessons learned from the COVID-19 experience are used to craft a more equitable, accessible, and efficient clinical research system that protects patient safety, ensures scientific integrity, and maintains data quality. The specific goals are: (1) ensure that clinical research is accessible, affordable, and equitable; (2) design more pragmatic and efficient clinical trials; (3) minimize administrative and regulatory burdens on research sites; (4) recruit, retain, and support a well-trained clinical research workforce; and (5) promote appropriate oversight and review of clinical trial conduct and results. Similarly, ASCO also organized its recommendations regarding cancer care delivery around five goals: (1) promote and protect equitable access to high-quality cancer care; (2) support safe delivery of high-quality cancer care; (3) advance policies to ensure oncology providers have sufficient resources to provide high-quality patient care; (4) recognize and address threats to clinician, provider, and patient well-being; and (5) improve patient access to high-quality cancer care via telemedicine. ASCO will work at all levels to advance the recommendations made in this report.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19/therapy , Medical Oncology , Neoplasms/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Clinical Trials as Topic , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Research Design , Societies, Medical
10.
J Palliat Med ; 24(8): 1213-1220, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-990535

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Define the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on pediatric palliative care team structures, communication, and workflow; and describe the roles, responsibilities, and reflections of interdisciplinary team members. Methods: Cross-sectional online surveys were posted on seven professional Listservs from May 2020 to June 2020. Data were summarized descriptively and with semantic content analyses. Results: N = 207 surveys were completed by pediatric palliative program representatives from 80 cities, inclusive of physicians, nurses, child life, social workers, chaplains, and psychologists. Teams consulted on <20% of potential or presumed COVID-19 cases in their centers. Sixty percent of personnel were deemed "essential" during the pandemic. One-third of personnel remained in their usual work locale, with some shifting to support adult palliative services and others working remotely. Over 60% reported a sense of team "distance" compared with "close" team cohesion, associated with physical location of team members (p < 0.01) and frequency of team counseling, education, or support meetings (p < 0.02). All programs adopted a form of telehealth for patient care, although 41% did not receive telehealth training and 73% perceived unequal care quality with virtual care. Absence of pediatric patients' family members due to visitation policies, missing human presence and physical touch, concern for personal and colleague health, and fear of financial sustainability for programs were notable stressors. Conclusions: While the number of children diagnosed with COVID-19 receiving hands-on care from pediatric palliative care teams was reportedly low, the coronavirus pandemic vastly impacted pediatric palliative care team structure, daily services, and communication models warranting attentiveness to lessons learned and future direction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Palliative Care , Adult , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 61(4): 805-811, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807897

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a dramatic impact on palliative care delivery and patient experiences. Less is known about the experiences and responses of palliative care clinicians. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to describe the pandemic's impact on pediatric palliative care clinicians' personal and professional well-being. METHODS: The Palliative Assessment of Needed DEvelopments & Modifications In the Era of Coronavirus (PANDEMIC) cross-sectional online survey was posted on 7 professional listservs between May and June 2020. We conducted a conventional content analysis of written responses to three open-ended questions regarding the lasting impact of COVID-19. RESULTS: Of 207 multidisciplinary respondents from 80 US cities, 148 (71%) provided written responses to open-ended questions, and 62 responses (42%) were related to personal, professional, or existential well-being. These responses were sorted into 4 major categories: personal burdens, professional burdens, personal benefits, and professional benefits. Respondents described burdens more commonly than they did benefits (67% vs. 33% of comments, respectively). Personal burdens related to increased fear and uncertainty, fear of bringing the virus home, and a sense of collective grief. Professional burdens included a sense of exhaustion, a challenge with work-life balance, personal experiences with colleagues infected with the virus, and considerations of leaving health care altogether. Personal benefits included lessons learned, an evolving sense of what matters, and improved work-life balance. Professional benefits included opportunities for professional development and a sense of professional purpose. CONCLUSION: Pediatric palliative care clinicians perceive a breadth of impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic. Ongoing clinician assessment is important as the pandemic continues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Fear/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Palliative Care , Pediatrics , COVID-19/therapy , Cross-Sectional Studies , Grief , Humans , Professional Role/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Uncertainty , United States
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