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1.
Curr Protoc ; 2(6): e453, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1877580

ABSTRACT

A diverse collection of viral pathogens target airway epithelial cells for infection, with effects ranging from mild upper respiratory tract symptoms to death of the infected individual. Among these pathogens are recently discovered and/or emergent viruses that sometimes fail to infect commonly used, immortalized cell lines and for which infection phenotypes in the respiratory tract remain unknown. Human airway epithelial cultures have been developed over the past several decades and have proven to be a useful model system in culturing hard-to-grow viruses and assaying various features of infection in a physiologically relevant setting. This article includes methods for the generation of well-differentiated human airway epithelial cell cultures at air-liquid interface that recapitulate the mucosal epithelium of the trachea/bronchus in vivo. We further detail inoculation of these cultures with respiratory viruses-specifically rhinovirus, influenza virus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-and provide a protocol for the detection of double-stranded RNA or viral antigen-positive cells by immunofluorescence microscopy. These techniques, together with a post-imaging analysis, can be applied to characterize the efficiency of infection and kinetics of spread within the airway epithelium. Furthermore, these methods can be utilized in conjunction with antibodies against cellular targets to determine cell tropism and colocalization with specific host factors during infection. © 2022 The Authors. Current Protocols published by Wiley Periodicals LLC. Basic Protocol 1: Generation of human airway epithelial cultures at air-liquid interface (HAE-ALI) Basic Protocol 2: Viral inoculation of HAE-ALI Basic Protocol 3: Immunofluorescence (IF)-based detection of infected cells in HAE-ALI.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Epithelial Cells , Fluorescent Antibody Technique , Humans , Respiratory System
2.
PLoS Pathog ; 18(4): e1010464, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789197

ABSTRACT

Interferons establish an antiviral state through the induction of hundreds of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). The mechanisms and viral specificities for most ISGs remain incompletely understood. To enable high-throughput interrogation of ISG antiviral functions in pooled genetic screens while mitigating potentially confounding effects of endogenous interferon and antiproliferative/proapoptotic ISG activities, we adapted a CRISPR-activation (CRISPRa) system for inducible ISG expression in isogenic cell lines with and without the capacity to respond to interferons. We used this platform to screen for ISGs that restrict SARS-CoV-2. Results included ISGs previously described to restrict SARS-CoV-2 and novel candidate antiviral factors. We validated a subset of these by complementary CRISPRa and cDNA expression experiments. OAS1, a top-ranked hit across multiple screens, exhibited strong antiviral effects against SARS-CoV-2, which required OAS1 catalytic activity. These studies demonstrate a high-throughput approach to assess antiviral functions within the ISG repertoire, exemplified by identification of multiple SARS-CoV-2 restriction factors.


Subject(s)
2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase , COVID-19 , Interferons , 2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase/genetics , 2',5'-Oligoadenylate Synthetase/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , COVID-19/genetics , Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats , Humans , Interferons/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
3.
Cell Rep ; 38(11): 110508, 2022 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700144

ABSTRACT

Concerns that infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the etiological agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), may cause new-onset diabetes persist in an evolving research landscape, and precise risk assessment is hampered by, at times, conflicting evidence. Here, leveraging comprehensive single-cell analyses of in vitro SARS-CoV-2-infected human pancreatic islets, we demonstrate that productive infection is strictly dependent on the SARS-CoV-2 entry receptor ACE2 and targets practically all pancreatic cell types. Importantly, the infection remains highly circumscribed and largely non-cytopathic and, despite a high viral burden in infected subsets, promotes only modest cellular perturbations and inflammatory responses. Similar experimental outcomes are also observed after islet infection with endemic coronaviruses. Thus, the limits of pancreatic SARS-CoV-2 infection, even under in vitro conditions of enhanced virus exposure, challenge the proposition that in vivo targeting of ß cells by SARS-CoV-2 precipitates new-onset diabetes. Whether restricted pancreatic damage and immunological alterations accrued by COVID-19 increase cumulative diabetes risk, however, remains to be evaluated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Insulin-Secreting Cells , Humans , Pancreas , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Virol ; 95(23): e0125721, 2021 11 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410202

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, the etiological agent of COVID-19, is characterized by a delay in type I interferon (IFN-I)-mediated antiviral defenses alongside robust cytokine production. Here, we investigate the underlying molecular basis for this imbalance and implicate virus-mediated activation of NF-κB in the absence of other canonical IFN-I-related transcription factors. Epigenetic and single-cell transcriptomic analyses show a selective NF-κB signature that was most prominent in infected cells. Disruption of NF-κB signaling through the silencing of the NF-κB transcription factor p65 or p50 resulted in loss of virus replication that was rescued upon reconstitution. These findings could be further corroborated with the use of NF-κB inhibitors, which reduced SARS-CoV-2 replication in vitro. These data suggest that the robust cytokine production in response to SARS-CoV-2, despite a diminished IFN-I response, is the product of a dependency on NF-κB for viral replication. IMPORTANCE The COVID-19 pandemic has caused significant mortality and morbidity around the world. Although effective vaccines have been developed, large parts of the world remain unvaccinated while new SARS-CoV-2 variants keep emerging. Furthermore, despite extensive efforts and large-scale drug screenings, no fully effective antiviral treatment options have been discovered yet. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance to gain a better understanding of essential factors driving SARS-CoV-2 replication to be able to develop novel approaches to target SARS-CoV-2 biology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Interferon Type I/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcription Factor RelA/metabolism , Transcriptome , Virus Replication , A549 Cells , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Epigenomics , Gene Expression Regulation , HEK293 Cells , HeLa Cells , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Signal Transduction , Single-Cell Analysis , Transcription Factor RelA/antagonists & inhibitors , Transcription Factor RelA/genetics , Transcription Factors/metabolism , Vero Cells
5.
Cell ; 184(1): 92-105.e16, 2021 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064907

ABSTRACT

To better understand host-virus genetic dependencies and find potential therapeutic targets for COVID-19, we performed a genome-scale CRISPR loss-of-function screen to identify host factors required for SARS-CoV-2 viral infection of human alveolar epithelial cells. Top-ranked genes cluster into distinct pathways, including the vacuolar ATPase proton pump, Retromer, and Commander complexes. We validate these gene targets using several orthogonal methods such as CRISPR knockout, RNA interference knockdown, and small-molecule inhibitors. Using single-cell RNA-sequencing, we identify shared transcriptional changes in cholesterol biosynthesis upon loss of top-ranked genes. In addition, given the key role of the ACE2 receptor in the early stages of viral entry, we show that loss of RAB7A reduces viral entry by sequestering the ACE2 receptor inside cells. Overall, this work provides a genome-scale, quantitative resource of the impact of the loss of each host gene on fitness/response to viral infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , A549 Cells , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Biosynthetic Pathways , COVID-19/metabolism , Cholesterol/biosynthesis , Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats , Endosomes/metabolism , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Knockdown Techniques , Gene Knockout Techniques/methods , Genome-Wide Association Study , Host-Pathogen Interactions/drug effects , Humans , RNA Interference , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , Single-Cell Analysis , Viral Load/drug effects , rab GTP-Binding Proteins/genetics
6.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 117(45): 28344-28354, 2020 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-887237

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent of the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic that is a serious global health problem. Evasion of IFN-mediated antiviral signaling is a common defense strategy that pathogenic viruses use to replicate and propagate in their host. In this study, we show that SARS-CoV-2 is able to efficiently block STAT1 and STAT2 nuclear translocation in order to impair transcriptional induction of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). Our results demonstrate that the viral accessory protein Orf6 exerts this anti-IFN activity. We found that SARS-CoV-2 Orf6 localizes at the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and directly interacts with Nup98-Rae1 via its C-terminal domain to impair docking of cargo-receptor (karyopherin/importin) complex and disrupt nuclear import. In addition, we show that a methionine-to-arginine substitution at residue 58 impairs Orf6 binding to the Nup98-Rae1 complex and abolishes its IFN antagonistic function. All together our data unravel a mechanism of viral antagonism in which a virus hijacks the Nup98-Rae1 complex to overcome the antiviral action of IFN.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Interferons/metabolism , Nuclear Pore Complex Proteins/metabolism , Nuclear Pore/metabolism , STAT1 Transcription Factor/metabolism , STAT2 Transcription Factor/metabolism , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Active Transport, Cell Nucleus , Animals , Binding Sites , Chlorocebus aethiops , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Nuclear Matrix-Associated Proteins/chemistry , Nuclear Matrix-Associated Proteins/metabolism , Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins/chemistry , Nucleocytoplasmic Transport Proteins/metabolism , Protein Binding , Signal Transduction , Vero Cells
7.
Immunity ; 53(3): 672-684.e11, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-797268

ABSTRACT

Autoinflammatory disease can result from monogenic errors of immunity. We describe a patient with early-onset multi-organ immune dysregulation resulting from a mosaic, gain-of-function mutation (S703I) in JAK1, encoding a kinase essential for signaling downstream of >25 cytokines. By custom single-cell RNA sequencing, we examine mosaicism with single-cell resolution. We find that JAK1 transcription was predominantly restricted to a single allele across different cells, introducing the concept of a mutational "transcriptotype" that differs from the genotype. Functionally, the mutation increases JAK1 activity and transactivates partnering JAKs, independent of its catalytic domain. S703I JAK1 is not only hypermorphic for cytokine signaling but also neomorphic, as it enables signaling cascades not canonically mediated by JAK1. Given these results, the patient was treated with tofacitinib, a JAK inhibitor, leading to the rapid resolution of clinical disease. These findings offer a platform for personalized medicine with the concurrent discovery of fundamental biological principles.


Subject(s)
Hereditary Autoinflammatory Diseases/genetics , Hereditary Autoinflammatory Diseases/pathology , Janus Kinase 1/genetics , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/genetics , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology , Adolescent , COVID-19/mortality , Catalytic Domain/genetics , Cell Line , Cytokines/metabolism , Female , Gain of Function Mutation/genetics , Genotype , HEK293 Cells , Hereditary Autoinflammatory Diseases/drug therapy , Humans , Janus Kinase 1/antagonists & inhibitors , Mosaicism , Piperidines/therapeutic use , Precision Medicine/methods , Pyrimidines/therapeutic use , Signal Transduction/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy
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