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1.
Adv Clin Chem ; 108: 155-209, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432691

ABSTRACT

Free light chain (FLC) kappa (k) and lambda (λ) consist of low molecular weight proteins produced in excess during immunoglobulin synthesis and secreted into the circulation. In patients with normal renal function, over 99% of FLCs are filtered and reabsorbed. Thus, the presence of FLCs in the serum is directly related to plasma cell activity and the balance between production and renal clearance. FLCs are bioactive molecules that may exist as monoclonal (m) and polyclonal (p) FLCs. These have been detected in several body fluids and may be key indicators of ongoing damage and/or illness. International guidelines now recommend mFLC for screening, diagnosis and monitoring multiple myeloma and other plasma cell dyscrasias. In current clinical practice, FLCs in urine indicate cast nephropathy and other renal injury, whereas their presence in cerebrospinal fluid is important for identifying central nervous system inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Increased pFLCs have also been detected in various conditions characterized by B cell activation, i.e., chronic inflammation, autoimmune disease and HCV infection. Monitoring the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic by analysis of salivary FLCs presents a significant opportunity in clinical immunology worthy of scientific pursuit.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Immunoglobulin lambda-Chains , Biomarkers , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Immunoglobulin Light Chains/urine , Immunoglobulin kappa-Chains/urine , Immunoglobulin lambda-Chains/urine
4.
J Drugs Dermatol ; 20(4): 374-378, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1184134

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent reports have surfaced from the United States Food and Drug Administration hearings in December 2020 regarding the COVID-19 vaccines and study participants who developed facial and/or lip swelling after receiving the newly developed drug. Despite an incidence rate of 0.02% in the vaccine arm of the Moderna mRNA-1273 trial, concerns have been expressed about the association of adverse reactions following soft tissue filler injections and the COVID-19 vaccines. The International Society for Dermatologic and Aesthetic Surgery (ISDS) understands these concerns and has designed the following study. METHODS: A global survey was designed to capture the incidence of adverse events related to: (1) previous soft tissue filler injections, (2) soft tissue filler injections during positive testing for COVID-19, and (3) soft tissue filler injections during and after receiving any of the COVID-19 vaccines globally available. RESULTS: The information of 106 survey participants from 18 different countries was analyzed. 80.2% (n=85) never experienced any adverse reaction following their soft tissue filler injection whereas 15.1% (n=16) experienced swelling and 4.7% (n=5) experienced pain that lasted longer than two days. Of those who received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine (n=78), 94.9% reported not to have experienced any adverse reaction related to their previous soft tissue filler injection, whereas 5.1% (n=4) reported to have perceived pain that lasted longer than two days. CONCLUSION: The data collected does not support the concern for an increased risk of developing adverse reactions following soft tissue filler injections associated with the COVID-19 vaccines compared to that risk associated with other previously described triggers or the default risk following soft tissue filler injections. J Drugs Dermatol. 20(4):374-378. doi:10.36849/JDD.2021.6041.


Subject(s)
Biocompatible Materials/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Dermatology/standards , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Edema/epidemiology , Edema/etiology , Face , Female , Humans , Incidence , Lip/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Surgery, Plastic , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
5.
J Math Ind ; 10(1): 22, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-704864

ABSTRACT

We present an epidemic model capable of describing key features of the Covid-19 pandemic. While capturing several qualitative properties of the virus spreading, it allows to compute the basic reproduction number, the number of deaths due to the virus and various other statistics. Numerical integrations are used to illustrate the adherence of the evolutions described by the model to specific well known real features of the present pandemic. In particular, this model is consistent with the well known relevance of quarantine, shows the dramatic role of care houses and accounts for the increase in the death toll when spatial movements are not constrained. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (10.1186/s13362-020-00090-4) contains supplementary material.

6.
J Drugs Dermatol ; 19(7): e1-e9, 2020 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690249

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic, originating in Wuhan, China, has become a major public health and economic challenge for countries around the world. As of May 08, 2020, there are over 3 million COVID-19 cases, and 250,000 COVID-19- associated deaths in 215 countries. As more data is collected, updated infection control measures are continuously released and published by government, public health authorities, and physician specialty associations. Across the globe, dermatological practices have had to limit their operations to varying degrees to facilitate disease control, but as the pandemic subsides, they will broaden their operations. In light of the uncertainty surrounding safe and effective practice of medical and aesthetic dermatology in the era of COVID-19, fourteen international experts in the field contributed to recommendations for effective infection control protocols and practice management modifications. While guidance from the World Health Organization and local public health officials comes first, these recommendations are crafted as a starting point for dermatologists worldwide to commence either reopening their doors to patients or expanding available service offerings. This can help ensure that patients receive needed care in the short term and improve long term practice viability. J Drugs Dermatol. 2020;19(7):e-1-e-9. doi:10.36849/JDD.2020.5293.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Dermatology , Pandemics , Physicians' Offices/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Humans , Infection Control , Personal Protective Equipment , Physicians , Skin Diseases/therapy , Telemedicine
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